Nintendo 64	Mario Kart 64, launched in 1996/1997 for the Nintendo 64, was a vast improvement from the SNES original. It moved the series to polygon-based true 3D computer graphics for track design, allowing for track features that were not possible with Mode 7, such as bridges, walls, pits, and elevation changes; however, the characters and items remain 2D pre-rendered sprites. Other new additions include digital voice acting, 4-player support, the modern character weight classification system, Mirror mode, ghost data for Time Trial courses, and a new item called the Spiny Shell which targets and attacks the player in the lead. The game features 16 normal race courses, as well as four battle courses. Though there are still eight playable characters, two new characters are introduced: Wario (replacing Koopa Troopa) and Donkey Kong (replacing Donkey Kong Jr.), both of whom have reappeared throughout the series.

Final Fantasy has spawned numerous spin-offs and metaseries. Several are, in fact, not Final Fantasy games, but were rebranded for North American release. Examples include the SaGa series, rebranded The Final Fantasy Legend, and its two sequels, Final Fantasy Legend II and Final Fantasy Legend III.[38] Final Fantasy Mystic Quest was specifically developed for a United States audience, and Final Fantasy Tactics is a tactical RPG that features many references and themes found in the series.[39][40] The spin-off Chocobo series, Crystal Chronicles series, and Kingdom Hearts series also include multiple Final Fantasy elements.[38][41] In 2003, the Final Fantasy series' first direct sequel, Final Fantasy X-2, was released.[42] Final Fantasy XIII was originally intended to stand on its own, but the team wanted to explore the world, characters and mythos more, resulting in the development and release of two sequels in 2011 and 2013 respectively, creating the series' first official trilogy.[28] Dissidia Final Fantasy was released in 2009, a fighting game that features heroes and villains from the first ten games of the main series.[43] It was followed by a prequel in 2011.[44] Other spin-offs have taken the form of subseries—Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Ivalice Alliance, and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy.
In the end, Mega Man defeated the remaining Robot Masters and infiltrated Wily's fortress. Along the way, Bass challenges him to a duel, having used Evil Energy to increase his power, but Mega Man emerges triumphant once more. When he finally reaches Dr. Wily, he is caught in an energy trap and is almost destroyed by Wily's machine's cannon, but is saved when Duo appears and takes the blast for him. Duo, now immobilized, is in turn saved by Proto Man. Mega Man thanks Proto Man for helping Duo recover and takes on Wily's newest machine.
I beat Mega Man 11 on Normal in about eight hours. I’m no speed runner, but Mega Man 11 provides a lot of options for Mega Masochists looking for timed challenges, including remixes of levels with leaderboards, most of which unlock when you beat the campaign for the first time: Jump Saver challenges you not to jump, Buster Breakdown challenges you not to shoot, and Balloon Rush adds balloons that you have to destroy or avoid based on their color. I had spent enough time with Mega Man 8’s levels by this point so I didn’t have much drive to put up my times. The best bonus mode, though, is the mysterious Dr. Light’s Trial, which is an ultra-hard, one-life-only set of unique levels similar to Breath of the Wild’s Trial of the Sword DLC -- and even better, it unlocks another mystery trial mode (whose trial could that be?). Finally, you can pump up the difficulty to Superhero and play through the campaign again, if you dare.

Despite the many years since the last new release in the series, various characters from the Legends series consistently appear in Capcom cross-over games such as Marvel vs. Capcom, and the Servbot characters have become iconic within the Capcom community, making many cameo appearances in non-Mega Man games, including Dead Rising and as part of the outfit obtained via achievements in Lost Planet 2.


Despite being a popular favorite with videogamers, Megaman hasn't had a new entry in years... until now. MEGA MAN 11 is a glorious love letter to past MM adventures. To a fault, it doesn't do anything majorly revolutionary, but considering the variable output of its sequels, it's at least gratifying to know that this turned out very well and easily better than the disappointing MIGHTY NO. 9. The game introduces a new "Double Gear" system, which provides opportunities for powering up or slowing down. Both of these are great additions. The gameplay remains as fun and glorious as it did for previous Mega Man entries. The graphic style is rendered in a clean, gorgeous hand-drawn style that feels very much at home with what you'd expect from classic MEGA MAN. There are cutscenes in the game, thankfully skippable, and yes, there's voice acting. Thankfully, the voice acting is for the most part pretty good and easily better than that of MEGA MAN 8 (Dr. Light's embarrassingly awful Elmer Fudd syndrome is thankfully gone in this one). The music has yet to catch me as truly memorable. It's passable stuff, although not quite as good as in previous MEGA MAN entries. All told, though, Capcom has done a fine job of producing a game that lives up to its predecessor, and it plays exceedingly smooth on Nintendo Switch with no noticeable hiccups. Fans of classic platforming, rejoice.


Because they had a good relationship with Tetra, they also quickly warmed up to her granddaughter Zelda when she asked for their help. They could also for some unexplained reason, see her even in her spirit form. They have stated Zelda's resemblance to Tetra whom they thought was an intelligent person. Even Byrne was moved by Zelda's words as he sacrificed himself to save New Hyrule despite his earlier intentions. Both Link and Zelda in turn were relieved to hear that Byrne was not truly dead. The Lokomos asked the duo to watch the land in there place, showing that they trust their Hylian allies.
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.

Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Mario Kart 64 is the first 3D mario game, Nintendo tried before this to make a Mario Kart for SNES. Because it is 3D it gets a lot better and easier to control. With new "Time Trials" and characters it will be very exciting when you win the Grand Prix like 100 times and  keep doing it again for the entertainment. Because of the fact that there is not many bugs I think that it makes it even greater. If you are a Mario Kart fan or just a Mario fan then I think that you should get it. I rated it ........5/5

However, Wily's frequent false repentances have become a constant frustration to Mega Man who appears to developing less patience with him, something that came to a head in the course of Mega Man 7 where he contemplated killing him, though ultimately decided against it. He further pointed out Wily's previous false repentances at the end of Mega Man 9, showing his diminishing patience, however he nonetheless assists him when he becomes ill in Mega Man 10.


As the last free descendant, Zelda uses telepathy to contact the descendant of the Knights of Hyrule, Link, to save her.[32] Despite his efforts in evacuating her from Hyrule Castle, Agahnim manages to capture Zelda and sacrifice her to the Dark World, breaking the seal between Hyrule and the Dark World.[80][81] While in the Dark World, Princess Zelda is held inside a crystal prison within Turtle Rock.[82] When Link frees her, she, along with the other maidens, breaks the seal surrounding Ganon's lair.[83]
Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[124] Initially released for the PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving six months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its original release in Japan.[125] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and uses only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X, in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[126][127] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XIV both make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix.[128][129]
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][94] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][116] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[100][117] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][116][120] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[206]
The game is maybe 10-15% story missions, and the rest mostly filler sidequests. The story missions are fairly enjoyable, and the dungeons especially are probably the high points for the game in general (actual plot happening, interesting/funny chatter, unique enemies, often very beautiful scenery - the one in the Vesperwood is my favorite so far). It's a shame that there aren't more important sidequests. Previous entries in the FF series had more benefits from sidequests than just extra gil/consumables or a decent new weapon. There was more lore, more character-building.. but the majority of these sidequests just feel like busywork.

In some games, lines of coins are found on the courses, which if run over and collected, will increase a kart's top speed and can be used to unlock kart parts. Having coins also helps players when their kart is hit by another: instead of spinning and losing control, they lose a coin. Coins are also lost when karts are struck by power-ups or fall off the tracks. The series also features advanced maneuvers such as drifting (also called power sliding), which allows a kart to rapidly turn in a direction preventing the need to brake; and hopping, which helps a kart to avoid obstacles or off-road parts and sometimes can be used to execute tighter turns (the kart makes a short hop and turns in the air, speeding off in the new direction when it lands).


I hereby pledge to you, kind internet strangers, to play OoT, TO COMPLETION, no matter how long it takes me. By "completion," I mean "defeat Ganon" (ain't got the staying power or skillz for 100%). I'm allowed to consult walkthroughs, but only when I'm on the verge of rage quitting, as this is more about willpower than it is intellect. I do have the original from when I was a child, but I've just bought the 3D version as it's portable, meaning I'll have less excuse to put it off (also it's an early Christmas treat to myself and only 16 quid on the Nintendo eShop). I'm hesistant to call this a New Year's resolution, as it might take me more than a year and I've started early, but hey ho. If I can do this, I can do anything!
"Get ready to be at the centre of the ultimate fantasy adventure. Enter the world of FINAL FANTASY XV, and experience epic action-packed battles along your journey of discovery. You are Noctis, the Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Lucis, and your quest is to reclaim your homeland from the clutches of the imperial army. Joined by your closest friends, you will take the wheel and experience a voyage like no other, travelling through the breath-taking world of Eos encountering larger-than-life beasts and unforgiving enemies. You will learn to master the skills of weaponry and magic, channelling the power of your ancestors allowing you to effortlessly warp through the air in thrilling combat. Fresh faces and long-time fans, fulfil your destiny and experience a brand new kind of fantasy. Pre-order the Day One Edition to receive the exclusive FINAL FANTASY series weapon - the Masamune!"
Dr. Wily having finally managed to modify the time machine, discovers that the time machine could now only travel into the future and back, not into the past. Dr. Wily modified his plan and decided instead to spy on Mega Man’s future. Travelling approximately 37.426 years into the future (as stated in the American manual), Wily found that the future was peaceful, as his future self had reformed and Mega Man no longer needing weapons, had been reset back into a peaceful household robot. Recognizing this chance, Wily convinces his future self to abduct the now defenseless Mega Man. Dr. Wily then proceeds to capture Mega Man, and modifies him into the fighting robot Quint, reprogramming him to make him fight against the Mega Man of the present.[11][12]

The series is Square Enix's flagship franchise and their best selling video game series with 130 million units sold[2](as well as revenue earned through mobile releases and MMO subscriptions), and has made an impact in popular culture, particularly for popularizing the console RPG genre outside of Japan. Its critically acclaimed orchestral musical scores, memorable and likable characters, realistic and detailed graphics and innovative mechanics have made the franchise notable in the industry.


Because of graphical limitations, the first games on the NES feature small sprite representations of the leading party members on the main world screen. Battle screens use more detailed, full versions of characters in a side-view perspective. This practice was used until Final Fantasy VI, which uses detailed versions for both screens. The NES sprites are 26 pixels high and use a color palette of 4 colors. 6 frames of animation are used to depict different character statuses like "healthy" and "fatigued". The SNES installments use updated graphics and effects, as well as higher quality audio than in previous games, but are otherwise similar to their predecessors in basic design. The SNES sprites are 2 pixels shorter, but have larger palettes and feature more animation frames: 11 colors and 40 frames respectively. The upgrade allowed designers to have characters be more detailed in appearance and express more emotions. The first game includes non-player characters (NPCs) the player could interact with, but they are mostly static in-game objects. Beginning with the second game, Square used predetermined pathways for NPCs to create more dynamic scenes that include comedy and drama.[114]


Princess Zelda,(TLoZ | TAoL | ALttP | OoT | OoS | OoA | TWW | FS | FSA | TMC | TP | ST | ALBW | BotW)[13][14] sometimes shortened to just Zelda,(SS | BotW | HW | SSBU)[15] is the eponymous name commonly given to the women born into the Royal Family of Hyrule in The Legend of Zelda series.[16] With the exception of Link's Awakening, Majora's Mask, and Tri Force Heroes, an incarnation of Zelda or one of her alter egos has always been one of the central characters in the series.

Like most RPGs, the Final Fantasy installments use an experience level system for character advancement, in which experience points are accumulated by killing enemies.[88][89][90][91] Character classes, specific jobs that enable unique abilities for characters, are another recurring theme. Introduced in the first game, character classes have been used differently in each game. Some restrict a character to a single job to integrate it into the story, while other games feature dynamic job systems that allow the player to choose from multiple classes and switch throughout the game. Though used heavily in many games, such systems have become less prevalent in favor of characters that are more versatile; characters still match an archetype, but are able to learn skills outside their class.[23][73][74]
The title theme of The Wind Waker is an absolutely magical piece of music. Inspired by traditional Irish music, the theme makes excellent use of strings and harps to capture the freedom and whimsy of Link’s seafaring adventure. Admittedly, as great as it is, I never thought this tune was versatile enough to exist beyond its original genre. But count me proven wrong, because musician Ace Waters has released an amazing synth cover of The Wind Waker‘s title theme that…
Learned by Impa and Kass, the Zelda that lived ten thousand years prior to the events of Breath of the Wild assisted Link and the four Champions in defending Hyrule from Calamity Ganon. Successfully defeating the Calamity, Zelda sealed Ganon away for ten thousand years, leading to his release one hundred years before the events of Breath of the Wild.
Don’t be too afraid, however: While tough stretches in previous Mega Man games forced you to learn patterns and hone your skills, in Mega Man 11 you can stock up on powerups to take the edge off. For every challenge, there’s a consumable item to snatch you out of a pit, refill your energy, or protect you from spikes. You just have to grind a bit to collect bolts and purchase your way to success. Of course, grinding is not fun, so it’s only when I got really annoyed with replaying a lengthy level that I went shopping.
Non-playable cameo appearances by Mega Man occur most often in other Capcom licensed games, and he is often seen as a background character. Such appearances include Mega Man Legends 2 (as a TV character), The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (TV character), Mega Man Star Force 2 (Brother), Adventure Quiz: Capcom World 2 (enemy), Street Fighter Alpha 3 (in a billboard), Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (in a banner and one of Norimano's attacks), Super Gem Fighter: Mini Mix (Felicia's attacks), Mighty Final Fight (in a billboard from the ending scene), and Power Stone 2.

As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.

×