After regaining her Triforce of Wisdom from Cia, Zelda decides to go to the Temple of the Sacred Sword in order to have Link retrieve the Master Sword in order to defeat the Dark Forces and Cia. Impa reminds Zelda that the sword is required to remain in its pedestal to keep the evil one's soul under seal, but Lana reveals that the temple's barrier should keep it contained without the sword. Link manages to obtain the Master Sword and the Hyrulean Forces then confront Cia at the Temple of Souls, however the partially revived Ganondorf appears and after Cia flees, targets Princess Zelda though fortunately he is defeated by Link wielding the Master Sword. Following Cia's defeat, Link does not return the Master Sword to its pedestal and as a result the barrier containing the final piece of Ganondorf's soul breaks, fully restoring the Demon King who revives Zant and Ghirahim to serve as generals in his army, in order to claim the complete Triforce. After Ganondorf obtains the complete Triforce, Zelda leads the remaining Hyrulean Forces into Gerudo Desert to take out Ganondorf's generals. They successfully defeat the pair and after learning from Impa that Ganondorf has taken Hyrule Castle and transformed it into his tower, Zelda leads the Hyrulean Forces to the final showdown with Ganondorf and his army.
Mario Kart Wii had a successful launch and sold 300,000 copies on the launch day in Japan alone, compared to Mario Kart DS which sold 160,000 copies on its first day and Mario Kart: Double Dash which sold 180,000 on its first day.[33] In the week ending May 4, 2008, Mario Kart Wii had sold over a million copies in Japan alone, less than a month since its release in the region.[34] In the UK, Mario Kart Wii was the best-selling video game in the week ending April 12, 2008, having "the eighth biggest opening sales week in UK software history," according to Chart-Track/ELSPA.[35][36] The game dwarfed all other five Mario Wii games released up until then for the Wii combined when comparing first week sales.[35] In the United States, Mario Kart Wii was the second-best-selling video game in April 2008, selling 1.12 million copies, according to the NPD Group; putting it behind the Xbox 360 version of Grand Theft Auto IV and ahead of the PlayStation 3 version, both released in the same week.[37] It ranked the fourth-best-selling game of December 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 979,000 copies.[38] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 2.409 million copies in the United States, 687,000 in the United Kingdom, and 1.601 million in Japan, respectively, for a total of 4.697 million copies sold by August 1, 2008.[39] As of March 2009, Nintendo has sold 15.4 million copies of Mario Kart Wii worldwide.[40] As of January 4, 2009, it has sold 2,133,000 copies in Japan.[41] It is also the fourth-best-selling game of Japan in 2008.[42] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 856,000 copies in the United States, 394,000 in the United Kingdom, and 218,000 in Japan, respectively, for a total of 1.468 million copies sold in the third quarter of 2008 (July–September).[43] It was the second-best-selling game of 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 5 million copies.[38] In France, it sold 4.8 million units, which is more than it sold in Japan (3.7 million).[44]

Because of the limitations of the LCD screen, there is no elaborate ending sequence. When the eighth dragon has been defeated, Princess Zelda walks out of her prison and right up to Link (just as she does in The Adventure of Link) as if to embrace him, but the animation ends just before they meet, leaving the end result up to the player's imagination.
The central protagonist of The Legend of Zelda series, Link is the name of various young men who characteristically wear a green tunic and a pointed cap, and are the bearers of the Triforce of Courage. In most games, the player can give Link a different name before the start of the adventure, and he will be referred by that given name throughout by the non-player characters (NPCs). The various Links each have a special title, such as "Hero of Time", "Hero of the Winds" or "Hero chosen by the gods". Like many silent protagonists in video games, Link does not speak, only producing grunts, yells, or similar sounds. Despite the player not seeing the dialogue, it is referenced second-hand by in-game characters, showing that he is not, in fact, mute. Link is shown as a silent protagonist so that the audience is able to have their own thoughts as to how their Link would answer the characters instead of him having scripted responses.
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[158][159][160][161][162][163] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[164] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[142][165] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[166]
The Mega Man X series has been positively received. The first Mega Man X game was widely acclaimed by critics since its release. Gaming magazines in the United States and Europe including Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), GamePro, Game Players, Nintendo Power, Super Play, and the German version of Total! consistently lauded the game's visuals, audio, control, and overall gameplay.[19][20][21][22][23][24][25] Game Players summarized Mega Man X as "a near-perfect cart with classic gameplay, excellent graphics and sound and tons of hidden items and power-ups".[24] Nintendo Power stated that the game had "great control and fun" along with "challenging play".[20]
During Linkle's Tale, Princess Zelda learns the magic of the Twilight Realm threatens Hyrule and leads a small group of Hyrulean Forces to stop it while her allies prepare to defeat Hyrule's enemies. Midna however follows her and meets Linkie who shows her a mysterious crystal that restores Midna's true form. Together they team up to help Zelda who is imprisoned by dark constructs of Twili Midna and Zant created by the out of control Twilight magic. Linkie and Twili Midna free Zelda and Twili Midna shatters the crystal to seal the Twilight magic at the cost of becoming cursed once more reverting to her Imp form though she is fine with it as Hyrule and Zelda are safe. Linkie inspired by Midna and Princess Zelda's selflessness decides to continue on her journey to Hyrule Castle instead of simply joining them.

In order to prevent the ambitions of Dr. Wily, Dr. Light had modified him into the combat robot "Rockman". With Rockman's success, world peace arrived, and a Robot Alliance was organized. Thanks to robotics progress was rapidly made... But the betrayal of Mr. X! The one controlling Dr. Wily from the shadows, can the ambitions of Mr. X for world domination be stopped? The greatest battle of all time begins!!
Complex ranked him as having the tenth best fighting game cameos for his guest appearances in Street Fighter X Tekken in 2012.[56] Joystick Division cited his rivalry with Dr. Wily as seventh of the ten greatest in video games, adding giving "great credit to this rivalry for its open-endedness"[57] and GamesRadar listed him and Proto Man as having one of the best brotherly rivalries in gaming.[58] UGO Networks have placed Mega Man as the eighth character who most deserves his own movie.[59]
A set of Legend of Zelda cartoons aired on Fridays from 1989 to 1990 as a part of DiC's The Super Mario Bros. Super Show. The series loosely follows the NES Zelda games, mixing settings and characters from them with original creations. Zelda is depicted as a warrior princess who wears more comfortable and practical garb as opposed to her appearances in the games. In addition to running the kingdom part-time for her father, King Harkinian, she often accompanies Link on his adventures and is quite skilled in archery (interestingly archery is a skill that Zelda would later demonstrate in various video games).
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Once upon a time, eight bosses and a handful of increasingly vicious Dr. Wily stages were all that a player might have needed to wile away day after day, scribbling down passwords and carefully memorizing the position of each precious E Tank. (Filed mentally right next to their grid map of Hyrule, or the locations of all the hidden 1-UP mushrooms in Super Mario Bros. 1.) But with modern conveniences like between-level saving and the ability to toss plentiful in-game currency at your supply of extra lives and mid-level recharges, those replayable, compulsive elements have been steadily whittled down. And even with its not-infrequent highs, Mega Man 11 doesn’t have anything more substantial to offer in their place, instead relying on a basic skeleton that can’t help but creak as its 30th anniversary arrives. Mega Man 9 (and, to a lesser extent, 10) overcame these pitfalls with a combination of laser-guided nostalgia and rock-solid platforming precision, but 10 years (and any number of more ambitious retro platformers—cough, Shovel Knight, cough) later, and even 11’s biggest swings for the unorthodox leave it feeling like little more than a trifle. In a medium that evolves by the day, 11 is content just to be a pretty good Mega Man game—for better and for worse.
Nearly all of the classic series Mega Man titles have been two-dimensional side-scrollers involving horizontal movement through various levels. This mechanic persists even on titles developed for high performance platforms, such as the Sony PSP release of Mega Man Powered Up, which features 3D graphics, yet movement to both the background and foreground is restricted. The main series on both the NES and Nintendo Game Boy would follow this formulaic approach in the design of every game developed on those systems, and set the standard for all platformer Mega Man games to come. Mega Man himself has evolved very little cosmetically since his initial release, but has often been given new techniques in each game. The New Mega Buster, for instance, which was introduced in Mega Man 4, allowed him to charge up a shot. The slide was introduced in Mega Man 3. It was these which were used in order to help him exceed any new challenges added by the programmers.
Final Fantasy[a] is a science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The series has also branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching out in other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.
In our newest Youtube series, Mases takes on The Legend of Zelda’s second quest while I accompany him on commentary. It has been quite some time since Mases has played through the second quest, and I’ve never seen any of it, so this ought to be a heck of a challenge. If you’d like to follow along with this series, I’d recommend heading over to our Youtube channel and subscribing so that you can watch the next episode as soon…
In the game's story mode, "The Subspace Emissary", Zelda is watching a match between Mario and Kirby alongside Princess Peach. When the flying battleship Halberd appears over the stadium, both princesses join Mario and Kirby in fighting off the enemies that emerge from it. After the fight, Mario is blown out of the stadium, and Zelda and Peach are captured by Petey Piranha, one of Mario's enemies. Kirby fights Petey to rescue the princesses, but can only save one of them (the player can choose which one). The other princess is turned into a trophy by Wario, and Kirby escapes with the rescued princess as the entire stadium is pulled into Subspace by a Subspace Bomb.
Though the Gerudo people had originally been against Urbosa becoming a Champion, after her death and Zelda's sealing of Ganon, they chose to remain loyal to Hyrule and as a result Riju and her bodyguard Buliara aided Link a century later out of respect for Lady Urbosa and Princess Zelda whom through Impa had tasked Link in freeing Vah Naboris. Though Riju had only heard of Zelda through legends, she respected her and the two even share similar backgrounds as Riju lost her mother forcing her to bear the burden of becoming Gerudo Chieftain. Riju even recognized the Sheikah Slate Link carried had belonged to Zelda previously showing she is well informed. Riju however like Zelda ultimately proves herself a capable leader despite her own doubts with Link's help. Presumably after Ganon's defeat, Zelda and Riju would work together to rebuild Hyrule and might even bond over their similar backgrounds.

In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]


Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
More details have been released regarding the new Mega Man TV show that is being produced. I am a little surprised to read that apparently they aren’t even going to try to stick to the plot of the games at all, but are simply taking the “Mega Man” name and a few miscellaneous inspirations from the series and going off on their own. The character design looks like a mix between X and Star Force—which, speaking of Star Force, that’s probably a good comparison regarding the chosen plot direction. There’s nothing inherently wrong with this, of course, and it means the plots will be new and not quite as predictable. And it’s not like we don’t already have enough different Mega Men to completely befuddle any newcomers to the series as it is...just look at the selector image above.
I somehow missed their board game, but there is a Mega Man card game in the works that as far as I can tell is authorized by Capcom even though it’s a Kickstarter. The project is a go and it looks like it will ship in July. This reminds me of how horribly out-of-date my original Toys section has become. Which is actually a good thing—it’s due to the fact that there is such a large amount of Mega Man merchandise available to us now!
According to Zelda's card in the official Twilight Princess trading card deck, she was going to become Queen of Hyrule. Zant's invasion came a few days before her scheduled coronation, thus preventing it from taking place. The game manual for the non-canonical Super Smash Bros. Brawl, which uses Zelda in her Twilight Princess form, does refer to her as the Queen of Hyrule—implying that once Link lifted the Twilight, the coronation took place as planned.
The Minish Cap is a special Nintendo game. The only new Zelda game on the Game Boy Advance console, the game felt like having a grand SNES adventure in the palm of your hands. The Minish Cap was a rare example of a Nintendo sharing its series with other developers, as the game was developed by Capcom and Flagship. This remix of the Hyrule Town and Picori Festival themes was posted on OverClocked Remix by Lemonectric. The remix, called “A Bag Full…
Wii U Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U in 2014, introduces anti-gravity sections that allow players to drive on walls and ceilings, allowing for more alternate paths in courses. In these sections, a player can bump into other racers or special bumpers to trigger a Spin Boost, which gives them an extra speed boost. The game also introduces all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), allows the player to view replay data from others and upload highlights to YouTube via "Mario Kart TV", introduces the Koopalings as new playable characters, and allows up to four people to play in Grand Prix races. Baby Rosalina and Pink Gold Peach are also introduced as new characters to the Mario franchise. Additional characters, vehicles, and tracks have been released as downloadable content, including actual Mercedes-Benz vehicles. Characters that have been released as add-on content include Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, the returning Dry Bowser, Link from The Legend of Zelda, and the Villager and Isabelle from Animal Crossing; tracks themed after various non-Mario game series have also been made available as add-on content. Additionally, Mario Kart 8 is notable for being the first game in the series to boast HD graphics and live-orchestrated music, as well as the first to receive post-release updates adding new features and enhancements, including rearranged post-race options, 200cc, and support for Nintendo's amiibo line of figurines.
Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
Up aerial Air Shooter 3% (early hits), 2% (middle hits), 1% (later hits), 2% (latest hits) Mega Man fires a small tornado straight above him. It travels a fair distance, drawing in opponents who touch the tornado. It is based on Air Man's weapon from Mega Man 2. It can easily Star KO opponents even at low percentages, especially if the opponent tries to jump out of it. However, it will meteor smash Mega Man himself if it is reflected.
Games can deviate from the standard format. Final Fantasy VI features relics as accessories, while Final Fantasy VIII has neither accessories nor armor, all effects typically associated with gear being abilities instead. Many games feature specific types of armor, such as head armor, body armor, arm armor or leg armor, while other games only have a single set of armor based on the character, such as Final Fantasy VII or Final Fantasy X. Armor can provide bonus abilities, such as resistances to status effects or elements, and in some games, such as Final Fantasy IX, are integral to the character growth system where characters learn new skills by equipping gear.
While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.
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