So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
After regaining her Triforce of Wisdom from Cia, Zelda decides to go to the Temple of the Sacred Sword in order to have Link retrieve the Master Sword in order to defeat the Dark Forces and Cia. Impa reminds Zelda that the sword is required to remain in its pedestal to keep the evil one's soul under seal, but Lana reveals that the temple's barrier should keep it contained without the sword. Link manages to obtain the Master Sword and the Hyrulean Forces then confront Cia at the Temple of Souls, however the partially revived Ganondorf appears and after Cia flees, targets Princess Zelda though fortunately he is defeated by Link wielding the Master Sword. Following Cia's defeat, Link does not return the Master Sword to its pedestal and as a result the barrier containing the final piece of Ganondorf's soul breaks, fully restoring the Demon King who revives Zant and Ghirahim to serve as generals in his army, in order to claim the complete Triforce. After Ganondorf obtains the complete Triforce, Zelda leads the remaining Hyrulean Forces into Gerudo Desert to take out Ganondorf's generals. They successfully defeat the pair and after learning from Impa that Ganondorf has taken Hyrule Castle and transformed it into his tower, Zelda leads the Hyrulean Forces to the final showdown with Ganondorf and his army.
One of the features of the series is the use of various power-up items obtained by driving into item boxes laid out on the course. These power-ups include mushrooms to give players a speed boost, Koopa Shells to be thrown at opponents, banana peels, and fake item boxes that can be laid on the course as hazards. The type of weapon received from an item box is influenced by the player's current position in the race.[3] For example, players lagging far behind may receive more powerful items while the leader may only receive small defensive items. Called rubber banding, this gameplay mechanism allows other players or computers a realistic chance to catch up to the leading player.
A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.

“The Blue Bomber is Back!”. I’ve been playing MM games since I was a child. I grew up in the 80’s and had most of the NES and SNES MM games. This one is easily in my top 3 favorites in the series! The game is a ton of fun, you can upgrade MM, buy items, and the graphics are gorgeous! I’m so hapoy they finally made a modern looking game. I love the older 8-bit visuals, but an growing a bit tired of them. This is a must buy!


There is so. much. waiting. in this game. Loading times are poorly optimized and take FOREVER if you aren't teleporting to somewhere close by where you just were. I'd say I'm spoiled by PC load times, except my old PC is a hunk of junk compared to the PS4's hardware. Driving is entirely uninteresting (save when you're doing the story driving missions, at least people talk then), and you have nothing at all to do in the up to 10 minute driving time except get suckered into nostalgia by the older FF soundtracks you can play, or look at the scenery. I should never have to pull out my cellphone and mess around on it out of boredom while I'm doing something that's supposed to be fun. It might also help to note that while you can "drive," it's pretty much an on-the-rails experience. If you try to veer too far to the right or left, Noctis will automatically correct it for you. So after trying it out once or twice, you're probably going to let your nanny/butler Ignis do the driving for you.

Mario Kart 7 features stereoscopic 3D graphics, introduces hang gliding and submersible karts, and features an alternate first-person perspective and kart customization.[3] Introduces Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen as new playable characters. It is also the first Mario Kart game after Mario Kart: Double Dash!! not to feature Waluigi as a playable character.


Recently a series of artbooks called the Official Complete Works has been published for individual Mega Man series, showcasing a large collection of artwork and background information. To date, books for the Zero, Classic and X (released together as R20), Star Force, and Battle Network series have been produced. Although these books have for many years been exclusive to Japan, UDON Entertainment Corporation has finished translating the Official Complete Works series for the North American market, called "R25".
Mega Man then went to Dr. Wily's castle and defeated Dr. Wily again. Dr. Wily, as usual, begged Mega Man for forgiveness. Mega Man responded to this by having Rush play clips of all the times Wily had done the same routine (the clips being scenes from previous games). Although Wily seemed contrite and apologetic, he tricked Mega Man into thinking that Dr. Light was, in fact, imprisoned in a jail cell in the next room. Although Proto Man appeared and warned him that it was a trap, Mega Man went to investigate the cell and was electrocuted by the fake Light robot and Wily set his hideout to self-destruct. Proto Man saved Mega Man, but Wily escaped yet again.
Mega man returns! the newest entry in this iconic series blends classic, challenging 2D platforming action with a fresh new visual style. The new double Gear system boosts Mega Man's speed and power for a new twist to the satisfying gameplay the series is known for. Long-await sequel evil genius Dr. Wily is back to his mischievous ways and invest in an ambitious idea from his time at robot university. The benevolent Dr. Light decides to upgrade Mega man with wily's powerful prototype known as the double Gear system, expanding his abilities for the greatest fight yet for everlasting peace. A visual leap taking a leap forward in visual presentation, the new game features a 2.5D design direction which blends beautiful, hand-drawn environments with lively characters. New to the classic series, Mega man now also takes on characteristics of defeated robot masters when wielding their weapons. Powerful new gameplay Options the double Gear system adds a unique new twist on the satisfying platforming action, offering Options to enhance Mega Man's speed and power on the fly. For vets and first-timers a wealth of difficulty Options are available for a player of any platformer skill level. Controls for an on-screen.
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
Whether racing around an obstacle-filled track or battling in an arena, drifting and tossing items are the keys to Mario Kart success. Players can shake the Wii Remote while launching off a ramp to pull off a trick that will temporarily boost their speed. When riding a bike, players can gain additional speed by flicking the Wii Remote up and popping a wheelie
The traditional Mega Man boss design is another knock against the Power Gear as a useful ability. Because bosses already have vulnerabilities to certain weapons, there’s no point in amping up the weapons that already easily cut them down, and increasing the damage of weapons that barely do any is like upgrading your Nerf gun to Super Soaker. However, I found two pretty cool uses for the Power Gear. One is that Tundra Man’s T. Storm can be amplified to wipe out all enemies on screen like a more efficient Infinite Gauntlet. People watching me play in the office got a kick out of me hitting what amounted to the “nuke’em from orbit” button when frustration set in. The second is Impact Man’s P. Driver ability, which is a mid-air dash attack which is more useful for getting around because its charged form lets you zoom across the whole screen. See ya, disappearing block puzzle!
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
In his early appearances in Twilight Princess, Zant inspires terrifying dread. His monstrous steel helm is grotesque with a thick, elongated tongue strewn across the lower mouth. Add in the enormous bulging bug eyes, and you have some excellent nightmare fuel fit for your worst enemies. It’s the perfect set up for an imposing villain. Later in the game, Zant’s villainous mystique grows as he creepily whispers into Midna’s ear, revealing a mouth that drips with saliva and split oddly…
Up special Default Rush Coil 0% Mega Man briefly summons his robotic dog companion Rush. A second bounce will make Mega Man jump even higher than the first bounce. Other players will also be able to bounce on Rush, even if he is in the air. Mega Man is unable to summon Rush again until he lands, or is hit by an attack after using it. The move is based on the Rush Coil from Mega Man 3.
9 clothing items hidden in treasure chests: Items honoring the legacy of The Legend of Zelda series will be hidden in 9 treasure chests scattered across Hyrule, including the Island Lobster Shirt, Ravio's Hood, Zant's Helmet, Phantom Ganon Skull, Phantom Ganon Armor, Phantom Ganon Greaves, and a Royal Guard outfit (complete with Royal Guard Cap, Royal Guard Uniform, and Royal Guard Boots).
"The Legend of Zelda Theme" is a recurring piece of music that was created for the first game of the franchise. The composer and sound director of the series, Koji Kondo, initially planned to use Maurice Ravel's Boléro as the game's title theme, but was forced to change it when he learned, late in the game's development cycle, that the copyright for the orchestral piece had not yet expired. As a result, Kondo wrote a new arrangement of the overworld theme within one day.[7] The "Zelda Theme" has topped ScrewAttack's "Top Ten Videogame Themes Ever" list.[8]
×