Near the beginning of The Wind Waker, Link saves a young pirate girl named Tetra after the Helmaroc King drops her into the nearby forest on Outset Island. After the bird kidnaps Link's sister Aryll, Tetra and her pirates bring Link to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue her. During the race for Nayru's Pearl, Link runs into Tetra at Windfall Island, where he steals the bombs from her pirate ship. Tetra allows Link until morning before she comes after him and Jabun. Link meets Tetra one last time, at the Forsaken Fortress, where she saves his sister and warns him of the Helmaroc King. She then attempts to save Link during his confrontation with Ganondorf. Her blows are easily deflected and Ganondorf strikes back, grabbing Tetra by the neck. Before he can do anything to her, his Triforce resonates, showing him that he has finally found Princess Zelda, with Tetra confused by Ganondorf's words.
Ganon, also known as Ganondorf in his humanoid form, is the main antagonist and the final boss in the majority of The Legend of Zelda games. In the series, Ganondorf is the leader of a race of desert brigands called the Gerudo, which consists entirely of female warriors save for one man born every one hundred years. He is significantly taller than other human NPCs, but his looks vary between games, often taking the form of a monstrous anthropomorphic boar. His specific motives vary from game to game, but most often his plans include him kidnapping Princess Zelda and planning to achieve domination of Hyrule and presumably the world beyond it. To this end, he seeks the Triforce, a powerful magical relic. He often possesses a portion of the Triforce called the Triforce of Power, which gives him great strength. However, it is often not enough to accomplish his ends, leading him to hunt the remaining Triforce pieces. Unlike Link, Zelda, and most other recurring characters, he is actually the same person in every game, with the exception of Four Swords Adventures, where he is a reincarnation of the original. In each game the battles with him are different and he fights using different styles. The game Skyward Sword indicates that Ganon is a reincarnation of an evil deity known as Demise.
Jump up ↑ "I had a dream... In the dream, dark storm clouds were billowing over the land of Hyrule... But suddenly, a ray of light shot out of the forest, parted the clouds and lit up the ground... The light turned into a figure holding a green and shining stone, followed by a fairy... I know this is a prophecy that someone would come from the forest..." — Princess Zelda (Ocarina of Time)
The Legend of Zelda games feature a mixture of puzzles, action, adventure/battle gameplay, and exploration. These elements have remained constant throughout the series, but with refinements and additions featured in each new game. Later games in the series also include stealth gameplay, where the player must avoid enemies while proceeding through a level, as well as racing elements. Although the games can be beaten with a minimal amount of exploration and side quests, the player is frequently rewarded with helpful items or increased abilities for solving puzzles or exploring hidden areas. Some items are consistent and appear many times throughout the series (such as bombs and bomb flowers, which can be used both as weapons and to open blocked or hidden doorways; boomerangs, which can kill or paralyze enemies; keys for locked doors; magic swords, shields, and bows and arrows), while others are unique to a single game. Though the games contain many role-playing elements (Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is the only one to include an experience system), they emphasize straightforward hack and slash-style combat over the strategic, turn-based or active time combat of games like Final Fantasy. The game's role-playing elements, however, have led to much debate over whether or not the Zelda games should be classified as action role-playing games, a genre on which the series has had a strong influence.[1]
Learned by Impa and Kass, the Zelda that lived ten thousand years prior to the events of Breath of the Wild assisted Link and the four Champions in defending Hyrule from Calamity Ganon. Successfully defeating the Calamity, Zelda sealed Ganon away for ten thousand years, leading to his release one hundred years before the events of Breath of the Wild.

In the Mario Kart series, players compete in go-kart races, distributed among several single-player and multiplayer modes, and control one of a selection of major Mario franchise characters. Up to twelve (originally eight) characters can compete in each race. When the characters are ready to begin racing in the starting grid, Lakitu comes in with a traffic light hanging from a fishing pole, which starts the countdown; when the light turns green, the race officially begins. During the race, the player's viewpoint is from behind or in front of his or her kart. The goal of the game is to either finish a race ahead of other racers, who are controlled by the computer and other players, or complete a circuit in the fastest time.
The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.
Down smash Flame Blast 17% (clean), 14% (mid), 9% (late) Mega Man plants both arm cannons into the ground, causing two vertical flaming pillars to erupt from the ground either side of him which launch the opponent upwards. It has quick startup, but notoriously long endlag that leaves it highly punishable if not landed. Immense knockback when hit with the first frames of the hitbox, which can KO starting at 60% when fully charged. It boasts incredible power, being the fourth-strongest down smash in SSB4, behind Lucario at maximum aura, Ganondorf, and Bowser Jr.. It is based on Flame Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
The series centers on Link, the playable character and chief protagonist. Link is often given the task of rescuing Princess Zelda and the kingdom of Hyrule from Ganon, who is the principal antagonist of the series; however, other settings and antagonists have appeared in several games. The plots commonly involve a relic known as the Triforce, a set of three omnipotent golden triangles. The protagonist in each game is usually not the same incarnation of Link, but a few exceptions exist.

Jump up ↑ "I had a dream... In the dream, dark storm clouds were billowing over the land of Hyrule... But suddenly, a ray of light shot out of the forest, parted the clouds and lit up the ground... The light turned into a figure holding a green and shining stone, followed by a fairy... I know this is a prophecy that someone would come from the forest..." — Princess Zelda (Ocarina of Time)


During her time with Link, Zelda wonders why he never speaks.[145] Link's initial silence causes Zelda to believe that Link despised her due to her inability to use sealing power despite being a daughter of Hyrule's royal family.[146] Later on, Zelda discovers an Ancient Shrine and fails to open it.[147] Link arrives at the scene, which angers Zelda and causes her to lash out.[148] She tells Link to return to the castle[149] and testily demands he stop following her, regardless of the King's orders.[150] Later on, Zelda travels to the Gerudo Desert and is ambushed by the Yiga Clan. Link rescues her right before a Yiga assassin is about to kill her, striking him down and causing the other two Yiga to flee. This causes Zelda to change her attitude towards Link, valuing his devotion to protect her.[151] Over the course of their journey, both start to open up to each other and realize how similar they are in their hardships of fulfilling their respective tasks.[152] Her growing care and relationship towards Link plays a crucial role in awakening her legendary abilities.[153]
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
The series has become a commercial success, and is the best selling Square Enix franchise with over 130 million units sold worldwide.[2] This makes it one of the best selling franchises world-wide. The best selling title has been Final Fantasy VII, with 11 million copies sold as of October 2015,[7] and became the second best selling game on the PlayStation.[83] The second best-selling title in the series is Final Fantasy X with over 8.05 million units sold as of August 2015 (not including the Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster).[84] Meanwhile, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn reached subscriber numbers of 5 million, making it the second most popular subscription-based MMO as of July 2015.[85] Mobile game Final Fantasy Record Keeper was downloaded over 5 million times in Japan alone as of August 2015.[86]

The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][116] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][94][116] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[197][198] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[199] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[200] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[201] Grandia,[202] and The Elder Scrolls.[200] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[203] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[204] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[117] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[205]
Long long time mega man fan. It's by far my favorite series. 2 and 9 have been my 2 favorites, but 1...1 may have just move to the top. I absolutely love this game. Capcom nailed it. I feel like they really need to do MM2 with this art style and play control. The game looks beautiful! Definitely buy this game. The gear system is amazing, all the weapons are great and very useful. Great game to speedrun, can't wait to see where this goes! See More
The bosses themselves are largely familiar, and that was disappointing. You may be surprised to learn that there hasn’t been a Torch Man before, because he is a clone of Fire Man, Heat Man, Flame Man etc. (However, his level, which is loosely summer camp-themed, is pretty cute.) Fuse Man, Tundra Man, and Blast Man all filled familiar Mega Man niches. I did like Acid Man, whose level featured PH balance (!) challenges as water went from neutral to acidic. Conversely, Bounce Man’s level is a total disaster as it uses some shaky physics to bounce Mega Man around deadly balloon-filled gauntlets, robbing you of control. Finally, Block Man is just the best: His Egyptian-like palace is filled with hieroglyphs of him triumphing over Mega Man.
Mega Man's first television appearances were produced for the American market and were based on the classic series. First was Captain N: The Game Master (1989-91), a show that took place in a universe that was made up up many different Nintendo games. It featured Mega Man as a main character and also featured Dr. Wiley as one of the antagonists. This was followed by Mega Man (1994-95), the first series to be based in the Mega Man universe.[citation needed]
Once Link returns to his own world, Zelda is overcome with joy at seeing him again, shedding tears. Soon after, Fi asks Link to put Master Sword back in its pedestal, which would mean their parting. While understanding Link's feelings and feeling sad herself, Zelda encourages Link to do, to which he complies with. Their parting is not a sad one however, with said goodbye ending on a happy note.
Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the death of her people. Subsequently, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle, although unlike her people, she does not become a spirit under the influence of the Twilight (possibly due to her implied possession of the Triforce of Wisdom). It is here that she meets Link, transformed into a wolf by the Twilight's power, though their conversation is cut short due to the arrival of her guard.
A possible indication of a blood relation between the two in Ocarina of Time is their physical resemblance: they both have blonde hair, blue eyes, and similar facial features. They also have similarly shaped heads. Graphics limitations could be responsible for some of this similarity, however. Certain dialogue could also be perceived as implying a blood relation: the ghost Sharp comments that Link reminds him of Zelda, and that Link "may have some connection with the Royal Family".[4] Link's connection to the Royal Family is highlighted throughout the game, with Link often playing Zelda's Lullaby to verify it. The fact that Impa agrees to teach an outsider a song only Royal Family members are allowed to know could also be interpreted as a hint at Link's blood relation to Hyrule's Royal Family. [5]

The Mario Kart series has been referenced twice in the Paper Mario role-playing game series. Luigi references it in an "adventure" of his which he recounts between chapters of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where in the third of his stories, he states that he visited a location called "Circuit Break Island" where kart races are organized every day. Later, in Paper Mario: Color Splash, once all six Big Paint Stars have been retrieved, Luigi drives his kart on Rainbow Road to transport Mario to Bowser's castle to defeat him and restore peace to Prism Island; when Bowser (who has been transformed by black paint) is reverted to normal upon his defeat, he asks Mario if they have a kart race scheduled. Additionally, several stages based on Mario Kart have appeared in the Super Smash Bros. series: Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS features a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, as well as reusing the Mario Circuit stage from Brawl. Although not actually shown in the first Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the franchise (which at that time had been composed of just Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64) was alluded to in a promotional ad for the game in Nintendo Power, where it mentioned that Nintendo's famous cast had previously "raced go-karts" when announcing their new role in the fighting ring.
When you get into the harder levels in the Grand Prix it will be completely normal to be hit with two or three things in a row. For example say you're a few seconds ahead, they will hit you with a pow, red shell, and a lightning bolt in a row to keep you stopped for several seconds. The suspicious part is how did the AI time firing the red shell so it would catch up just after you got hit with the pow?

Afterwards, Impa reveals to Zelda and the others of her intent to remain in the past to safeguard the Master Sword, much to Zelda's sadness. As a token of her appreciation, Zelda gives one of her armlets to the Sheikah. Impa assures Zelda that they will reunite, before watching the Hylians depart to their own time. At the Sealed Grounds' overseer of their time, Zelda, Link, and Groose are greeted by the Old Lady. Zelda notices the Old Lady's armlet, realizing that it is the one she gave to Impa. The Old Lady is then revealed to be Impa of the present, to everyone's surprise. Immediately afterwards, Impa passes on, with Zelda thanking her for everything she did for them.
What he means by this is that Zelda's mother couldn't teach how to access the power to seal Gannon away. As Zelda grew older, she became the gossip mongers favorite subject. Behind her back, they whispered how she was heir to the throne of nothing and how she was a failure. She grew frustrated when Link became her guard, and she expressed that feeling by shouting at him.
Some time before the Great Calamity, the Yiga Clan even attempted to assassinate Zelda before she could awaken her sealing magic. They would have succeeded, had it not been for Link`s intervention. After the Great Calamity, with Zelda sealing herself with Ganon in Hyrule Castle, the Yiga Clan focused on hunting down Link and any of Zelda's surviving allies instead.
Princess Zelda returns as a playable character in the fourth installment of Super Smash Bros. Zelda's appearance is once again based on her Twilight Princess design. She can no longer transform into Sheik, as she is her own character now. Her move set and Final Smash is largely the same as in Brawl. However her ability to transform is replaced by the Phantom Slash, where she summons a Phantom Knight straight from The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks to block enemy attacks and projectiles.

Jump up ↑ "I set out for Goron City today to make some adjustments to Divine Beast Vah Rudania. I still recall feeling his eyes on me as I walked ahead. The feeling stayed with me so long, I grew anxious and weary. It is the same feeling I've felt before in his company... And still, not a word passed his lips. I never know what he's thinking! It makes my imagination run wild, guessing at what he is thinking but will not say." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)


6% when thrown Mega Man summons an orbiting shield of petals. Like the Leaf Shield, it blocks projectiles, but the petals do not dissapear when hit, circulate around the user in a wider area, and deal slightly more damage. In exchange, it has slower startup (both on activation and when fired) and flies a much shorter distance when thrown at a slower speed. It also lasts a shorter duration, which can be both a harm and a help depending on the situation.
Game runs at a solid 60 fps, but when it is 3 or 4 player split-screen, the frame rate noticeable drops to 30 fps. Still playable though. Online was pretty smooth, and out of all the matches I played, I very rarely lost connection and when I did, it was during a lobby instead of during races. Mario Kart TV is a very nice touch since it saves the last 12 races that occurred. My petty complaint of it is that it doesn’t show the exact things you saw on your screen.
The Final Fantasy series has now grown to 15 core games, along with over dozens of spin-offs, sequels, remakes, ports, movies, and more. Final Fantasy I was first released in 1987 (JP), now coming up to Square Enix's 30th anniversary, Final Fantasy XV awaits to be released for the upcoming XBOX One and PS4. The popularity of the franchise continues to grow as it continues to pave the road in RPG creativity and innovation. As the series continues to expand, the complete game list below will be updated accordingly.
Featuring characters and settings from the TV series, this fleetingly entertaining comic only ran for four issues. Although Zelda's feelings for Link are made quite clear, there is another element at play here: her duty to the Triforce, which must come before her own needs and desires. When Link is corrupted by the Triforce of Power in one story, this Zelda briefly possesses his Triforce of Courage, which will not reside with one who uses Power without Wisdom.
From the beginning Uematsu was given creative freedom, though the series' creator Hironobu Sakaguchi would request specific set-pieces to fit themes, and early on there were specific notes Uematsu was unable to use due to hardware limitations.[18] From Final Fantasy IV onwards, he had more freedom of instrumentation. For "One-Winged Angel", the Final Fantasy VII final boss theme and the series' first vocalized theme, Uematsu combined both rock and orchestral influences having had no prior training in orchestra conduction.[18]
Mega Man 11 sticks so close to the established formula that it wouldn’t have made much of a splash if it had come out in 2008, or 1998. In fact, it has more in common with 1996’s Mega Man 8 than any other game in the series, and feels like a direct sequel to it. I found Mega Man 11 amusingly difficult even with the help of the time-slowing Double Gear system and there are some cool robot moments, but in a series with such great highs (Mega Man 2, 3, 9,10, specifically) and lows (Mega Man 7), it’s pretty average. The robot bosses are mostly bland and familiar (with the exception of the very silly Block Man – I love that guy), and their imparted weapons are a hit-and-miss collection. But Mega Man plays like he should even with the cutesy but tolerable art style, and that’s good because the challenge is cranked up to 11 and getting through these levels takes old-school precision and patience. Mega Man 11 is a good foundation for the next 10 Mega Man games.
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! features co-operative LAN play and two-player karts.[3] It also introduces eleven new playable characters (Princess Daisy, Birdo, Baby Mario, Baby Luigi, Paratroopa, Diddy Kong, Bowser Jr., Waluigi, Toadette, Petey Piranha, and King Boo). The game also features special items that are specific to each character. Finally, this game introduced unlockable characters and karts to the series.
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