Games in The Legend of Zelda series frequently feature in-game musical instruments, particularly in musical puzzles, which are widespread.[2] Often, instruments trigger game events: for example, the recorder in The Legend of Zelda can reveal secret areas, as well as warp Link to the Dungeon entrances. This warping with music feature has also been used in A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening. In Ocarina of Time, playing instruments is a core part of the game, with the player needing to play the instrument through the use of the game controller to succeed.[3] Ocarina of Time is "[one of the] first contemporary non-dance title[s] to feature music-making as part of its gameplay",[4] using music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to utilise songs to progress in the game[5] – a game mechanic that is also present in Majora's Mask.[6]
In Sonic Lost World, a DLC stage based on The Legend of Zelda series was released in March 2014, named "The Legend of Zelda Zone". While built around the core gameplay mechanics of Sonic Lost World, "The Legend of Zelda Zone" incorporates some elements from the Zelda series, including a heart-based vitality meter, rupee collection, and a miniature dungeon to explore.[116]

After switching over to the Famicom, there was a time when I wasn't happy with anything I was creating. I thought of retiring from the game industry and I created Final Fantasy as my final project. That's why the title includes the word 'final' but for me, the title 'Final Fantasy' reflects my emotional state at the time and the feeling that time had stopped. They say that technologically, it's good to keep going, and each time, we give it our all and expend our skills and energy until we can go no further; this is what I consider to be the 'final fantasy'.
From the beginning Uematsu was given creative freedom, though the series' creator Hironobu Sakaguchi would request specific set-pieces to fit themes, and early on there were specific notes Uematsu was unable to use due to hardware limitations.[18] From Final Fantasy IV onwards, he had more freedom of instrumentation. For "One-Winged Angel", the Final Fantasy VII final boss theme and the series' first vocalized theme, Uematsu combined both rock and orchestral influences having had no prior training in orchestra conduction.[18]
Mega Man is the only character to have additional effects added to his KO explosion. When Mega Man gets KO'd, he splits into multiple orbs with identical coloration to his outfit, while the signature "lose a life" sound from the original Mega Man echoes in the background. This is a direct reference to what would happen to him in the Mega Man series whenever he dies.
Princess Zelda is the princess of Hyrule and the guardian of the Triforce of Wisdom. Her name is present in many of her female ancestors and descendants. While most games require Link to save Zelda from Ganon, she sometimes plays a supporting role in battle, using magical powers and weapons such as Light Arrows to aid Link. With the exception of the CD-i games (which were not official Nintendo games), she was not playable in the main series until Spirit Tracks, where she becomes a spirit and can possess a Phantom Knight that can be controlled by the player. Zelda appears under various other aliases and alter egos, including Sheik (in Ocarina of Time) and Tetra (in The Wind Waker and Phantom Hourglass). In Skyward Sword, it is revealed that the Zelda of that game is a reincarnation of the goddess Hylia, whose power flows through the royal bloodline. The name "Zelda" derives from the American novelist Zelda Fitzgerald.[55]
Though it’s also on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, I felt compelled to first play Mega Man 11 on a Nintendo system, where the majority of the Mega Man games have lived. Here’s what you need to know about playing Mega Man 11 on Nintendo Switch: Unfortunately, there’s a small, but significant flaw in that the Y and B buttons on the right Joy-Con are too near the right thumbstick, and the classic Mega Man players’ pattern of shooting and jumping simultaneously can result in some accidental hits of the right thumbstick, which by default changes your weapons (you can turn this stick function off). Additionally, not having a D-pad on the left Joy-Con stinks. I also experienced some incorrect button signals getting to the television when playing in docked mode. Thankfully, all of this can be circumvented by using the Pro Controller (if you have one).
The story begins with Zelda awakening from a recurring nightmare, which she and Impa believe to be a sign of troubled times approaching. While visiting the training barracks of Hyrule Castle, she sees a particularly talented recruit that seems to be different from the others - however, her attention is quickly directed to a massive army of monsters approaching the castle. Zelda personally leads the defense of her castle, soon joined by Impa and Link, the recruit from earlier who had just been revealed as the reincarnation of the legendary hero by his possession of the Triforce of Courage. With the battle seemingly under control, Zelda returned to Hyrule Castle to coordinate her forces, only to be ambushed by Wizzro while her army was distracted by King Dodongo.

Mega Man, known as Rockman in Japan, is a video game franchise created by Capcom, starring the robot character Mega Man, or one of his many counterparts. Mega Man, released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1987, was the first in a series of over 50 games on multiple systems. A roster of corrupted robot masters faced Mega Man in separate stages in the game. By March 2015, the series had sold about thirty million copies worldwide.[1]
Nintendo 64	Mario Kart 64, launched in 1996/1997 for the Nintendo 64, was a vast improvement from the SNES original. It moved the series to polygon-based true 3D computer graphics for track design, allowing for track features that were not possible with Mode 7, such as bridges, walls, pits, and elevation changes; however, the characters and items remain 2D pre-rendered sprites. Other new additions include digital voice acting, 4-player support, the modern character weight classification system, Mirror mode, ghost data for Time Trial courses, and a new item called the Spiny Shell which targets and attacks the player in the lead. The game features 16 normal race courses, as well as four battle courses. Though there are still eight playable characters, two new characters are introduced: Wario (replacing Koopa Troopa) and Donkey Kong (replacing Donkey Kong Jr.), both of whom have reappeared throughout the series.

Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
Shigeru Miyamoto has stated that Zelda's name was inspired by Zelda Fitzgerald. The name Zelda is generally believed to be Germanic in origin, meaning "gray fighting maid" or "woman warrior" and derived from the Old German Griselda ("dark battle").[7] Another possible origin is the Old English word selde ("companion").[8] Additionally, it is a Yiddish name meaning "happiness" or "luck".
Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]
Various artbooks and source books have been released for many years in Japan, often including conceptual artwork, interviews with production staff, and background information on the storyline and concepts that are not present within the games themselves. One of the most well-known is the Rockman Perfect Memories sourcebook released in 2002 which first confirmed the presence of an alternate timeline (for Battle Network), as well as exactly where the Legends series fit into the fictional Mega Man universe.
NGamer, however, claimed that the tracks are too big for local multiplayer matches. Also, IGN criticized the rubber band AI in the 150cc races of the Grand Prix[25] and NGamer UK was disappointed that Battle mode can now only be played in teams; no free-for-all option is offered which removes the 'last man standing' element of previous Mario Kart Battle modes. Reviewers such as GameTrailers and IGN also commented that it is easy to fall from first place to last by being continuously attacked by several weapons, many of which are unavoidable, leading to a certain amount of luck in racing. This makes it more accessible for beginners, but can be extremely discouraging for skilled players.[22][25] GameSpot also noted that "nostalgia doesn't save most of the classic courses from being boring."[23]
Custom 2 Plant Barrier 3% (circling), 4.2% (thrown) Mega Man summons flower petal-shaped units that orbit around him. The petals are more durable than the Leaf Shield, as they do not disappear when hit and deal slightly more damage when thrown, but they move slightly slower and have less range when thrown. The move is based on Plant Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
ive had a wii since the day it came out. i ended up giving it to my dad when i left for the navy. recently during the holiday season, nintendo made the wii u and its awesome! i bought myself that and eventually decided to get this game. i never played mario kart atleast not since nintendo 64 days so this was a cool way to incorperate the wii remote and the new driving wheel accessory. the courses seem to be entertaining and they even have "the throw back" tracks from when i was first introduced to this game back on SNES. the graphics are good and they got a lot more characters although i am always yoshi (some things never change lol). this is a very fun game and a good game to play when you got friends over.
Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73]

The official Twitter account for The Legend of Zelda recently unveiled new artwork featuring Zelda characters who are rostered in the new Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The artwork showcases Breath of the Wild’s Link, sporting his blue Champions Tunic, alongside Toon Link and Child Link, each of whom are competing with Ganondorf, Sheik, and Princess Zelda in an attempt to reach the Triforce first. The artwork was released as part of a Nintendo-wide countdown to December 7th, when the game is released to the public and available to…
Side special Crash Bomber 1-2% per hit, up to 8% Mega Man fires a Crash Bomb, which latches onto fighters and can be transferred between them. After a short time, the bomb explodes, hitting multiple times. Dissapears after travelling a moderate distance. Operates identically to the Gooey Bomb from Super Smash Bros. Brawl, but with a shorter time before exploding.
As I understand it, Nintendo is keen to have a Zelda game launch on Switch every year. Following 2017 epic Breath of the Wild, 2018 had a port of spin-off Hyrule Warriors. Is Skyward Sword HD Nintendo's Zelda game for 2019? Nintendo traditionally turns up to The Game Awards every year with something new to show. And guess what - that's next week! Maybe we'll hear something then.
Despite having an unusual set of moves, Mega Man shines in approaching while spacing opponents at midrange and disrupting any approaches, for he is blessed with two projectiles that can cause opponents to react predictably: Metal Blade's ability to be thrown in eight directions and trapping opponents in high hitstun makes it a fantastic mindgame and shield-baiting tool, while Crash Bomber can cause panicky opponents to run towards Mega Man or shield the explosion. Both projectiles easily lead to a grab punish as Mega Man owns a great grab combo ability, having a fast grab and many of his attacks connecting reliably after a throw. This allows him to rack up damage easily once he grabs an opponent. He does not have much trouble KOing once his opponents are damaged either, for he has many finishing options: from his lightning-fast up tilt to his projectile based forward smash which can be used to edgeguard. His other projectiles are terrific, notably his aerials; up aerial can KO early if an opponent is high up, and his down aerial is one of the safest meteor smashes in the game. To top it all off, Mega Man is a fantastic spacer: his jab is a fast and useful projectile (that can be used while moving and jumping) which interrupts most attacks and weak projectiles at a safe range, and when combined with Metal Blades and Crash Bombs makes Mega Man difficult to approach. Due to his amazing pressuring ability and grab game, characters without a projectile or with low reach can have trouble approaching without being severely punished. Even if he does get knocked around, Mega Man is a heavyweight character, weighing only slightly less than Captain Falcon, meaning he is more likely to survive potentially lethal blows that could KO a lighter character, especially with proper DI and his good recovery move, Rush Coil.

Game runs at a solid 60 fps, but when it is 3 or 4 player split-screen, the frame rate noticeable drops to 30 fps. Still playable though. Online was pretty smooth, and out of all the matches I played, I very rarely lost connection and when I did, it was during a lobby instead of during races. Mario Kart TV is a very nice touch since it saves the last 12 races that occurred. My petty complaint of it is that it doesn’t show the exact things you saw on your screen.
In the Hyrule Warriors series, Princess Zelda acts as the Supreme Leader of the Hyrulean Forces and the Hyrulean Soldiers bravely serve her in much the same way as in Twilight Princess and Ocarina of Time. Despite her role as a military commander, she retains the compassion for the soldiers that serve under her but chooses to fight alongside them rather than protected by them. In turn her soldiers are very loyal to her and she can raise their moral with words alone, though this can be a double-edged sword as they become quite demoralized when she goes missing and were it not for the leadership of Link and Impa, the entire Hyrulean Forces may have been defeated by the Dark Forces. Though she later returned to fight alongside them under her guise as Sheik, they did not recognize her (though to be fair neither did Impa) and continued to search for the missing Princess. However they were relived when her identity was revealed and did not hold her deception against her. They also did not abandon her or Hyrule when Ganondorf managed to steal the Triforce of Courage and Triforce of Wisdom and later joined her in invading Gerudo Desert in order to defeat Ganondorf's generals, Zant and Ghirahim. After managing to defeat the villains, Zelda would lead her army to reclaim Hyrule Castle and defeat Ganondorf's Forces. The surviving soldiers would also fight alongside Zelda and her allies in the final battle against Ganon.
Mega Man will be returning along with all the past playable characters as part of this new game. In addition, his Mega Legends Final Smash has been updated to include both Proto Man and Bass as part of the attack. Unlike the previous game, Mega Man is no longer part of the starting roster and needs to be unlocked, since only the 8 characters from the original Super Smash Bros. will serve as the starting roster.[13]
According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21] 
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