In some games, lines of coins are found on the courses, which if run over and collected, will increase a kart's top speed and can be used to unlock kart parts. Having coins also helps players when their kart is hit by another: instead of spinning and losing control, they lose a coin. Coins are also lost when karts are struck by power-ups or fall off the tracks. The series also features advanced maneuvers such as drifting (also called power sliding), which allows a kart to rapidly turn in a direction preventing the need to brake; and hopping, which helps a kart to avoid obstacles or off-road parts and sometimes can be used to execute tighter turns (the kart makes a short hop and turns in the air, speeding off in the new direction when it lands).
Multiple members of the game industry have expressed how Zelda games have impacted them. Rockstar Games founder and Grand Theft Auto director, Dan Houser, stated, "Anyone who makes 3-D games who says they've not borrowed something from Mario or Zelda [on the Nintendo 64] is lying."[194] Rockstar founder and Grand Theft Auto director Sam Houser also cited the influence of Zelda, describing Grand Theft Auto III as "Zelda meets Goodfellas".[195] Ōkami director Hideki Kamiya (Capcom, PlatinumGames) states that he has been influenced by The Legend of Zelda series in developing the game, citing The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past as his favorite game of all time.[196] Soul Reaver and Uncharted director, Amy Hennig (Crystal Dynamics, Naughty Dog), cited Zelda as inspiration for the Legacy of Kain series, noting A Link to the Past's influence on Blood Omen and Ocarina of Time's influence on Soul Reaver.[197] Soul Reaver and Uncharted creator, Richard Lemarchand (Crystal Dynamics, Naughty Dog), cited A Link to the Past's approach to combining gameplay with storytelling as inspiration for Soul Reaver.[198] Wing Commander and Star Citizen director, Chris Roberts (Origin Systems, Cloud Imperium Games), cited Zelda as an influence on his action role-playing game, Times of Lore.[199]
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Super Mario Kart was the first entry in the series, released for the SNES in 1992. The game has a total of eight playable characters who, when computer-controlled, use special power-up items specific to each character (such as eggs for Yoshi). The twenty tracks in this game, based on locations in Super Mario World (such as Donut Plains), are all short in length compared to other tracks in the series; thus, they are raced in five laps instead of the usual three. Whereas most other playable characters have reappeared in all later entries in the series, Koopa Troopa has only returned intermittently, and Donkey Kong Jr. would never again be used as a playable character, except for two Mario Tennis games. Unlike other games in the series, Super Mario Kart allows players only a limited number of lives, which are lost whenever a racer loses and is "ranked out". A notable aspect of the game's presentation is its use of the SNES's Mode 7 graphics technology, which allows for free rotation and scaling of planes to give a three-dimensional appearance.
The Legend of Zelda[a] is an action-adventure video-game series created by Japanese game designers Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. It is primarily developed and published by Nintendo, although some portable installments and re-releases have been outsourced to Capcom, Vanpool, and Grezzo. The series' gameplay incorporates elements of action, adventure, and puzzle-solving games.
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Back to Zelda though, the atmosphere, graphics, sound and gameplay are all SPOT ON. There's crafting of Food, Potions, Weapons and Armor as well as a bunch of quests, side quests and tons of hidden content to keep you engrossed for at least the next several months... The Game of the Year buzz that this game has received is 100% deserved. Get this game! You will LOVE It!
Souls creator Hidetaka Miyazaki (FromSoftware) named A Link To The Past as one of his favorite role-playing video games.[200] According to Miyazaki, "The Legend of Zelda became a sort of textbook for 3D action games."[201] Ico director Fumito Ueda (Team Ico) cited Zelda as an influence on Shadow of the Colossus.[202] Fable series director Peter Molyneux (Lionhead Studios, Microsoft Studios) stated that Twilight Princess is one of his favorite games. "I just feel it's jaw-dropping and its use of the hardware was brilliant. And I've played that game through several times," he said to TechRadar.[203] Darksiders director David L. Adams (Vigil Games) cited Zelda as an influence on his work.[204] Prince of Persia and Assassin's Creed director Raphael Lacoste (Ubisoft) cited The Wind Waker as an influence on Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag.[205] CD Projekt Red (The Witcher, Cyberpunk 2077) cited the Zelda series as an influence on The Witcher series, including The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.[206] Final Fantasy and The 3rd Birthday director Hajime Tabata (Square Enix) cited Ocarina of Time as inspiration for the seamless open world of Final Fantasy XV.[207]

There is one significant advantage to playing on Switch, however: You can totally cheat with amiibo! Scanning an amiibo while Mega Man 11 is paused instantly fills your health or weapon bars, or it might even give you a 1-Up, but it’s limited in that you can only scan a single amiibo once a day, and bonuses max out at 20 per day. (You can change your clock to get around this.) In a brutally hard game, this is a pretty fun (though potentially expensive) way to bend the rules.


Mega Man's first animated appearance was as a main character in the 1989 series Captain N: The Game Master, which features a myriad of characters that had appeared on Nintendo consoles up until that time. They all aid the title character, Captain N, in his quest to save the world of Videoland, encountering many villains, including Mega Man's own enemy Dr. Wily. Mega Man is green and is voiced in this series by Doug Parker. His character also has a speech impediment and a tendency to add the word "mega" in front of words for emphasis.
Among them are a slot car racer series based on Mario Kart DS, which comes with Mario and Donkey Kong figures, while Wario and Luigi are available separately. A line of radio-controlled karts have also been marketed, with are controlled by Game Boy Advance-shaped controllers, and feature Mario, Donkey Kong, and Yoshi. There are additional, larger karts that depict the same trio and are radio-controlled by a GameCube-shape controller.

@ryancraddock With Switch, compared to other systems the physical versus digital matter is a lot more significant since there's very limited space for games at high cost, digitally, one has to be choosy with digital acquisitions. Ultimately physical buyers are going to be able to buy a lot more games. And WoFF is a relatively large game in terms of SD usage.

So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
In several games, Zelda has a nursemaid named Impa, a faithful servant who is heavily hinted to be largely responsible for raising her and cultivating her abilities. In The Legend of Zelda, Impa is her most trusted servant, the one whom she entrusts with the task of finding a hero to defeat Ganon. In The Adventure of Link, it is Impa who brings Link to the North Castle and recounts the story of the ancient curse on the sleeping Zelda.

In his early appearances in Twilight Princess, Zant inspires terrifying dread. His monstrous steel helm is grotesque with a thick, elongated tongue strewn across the lower mouth. Add in the enormous bulging bug eyes, and you have some excellent nightmare fuel fit for your worst enemies. It’s the perfect set up for an imposing villain. Later in the game, Zant’s villainous mystique grows as he creepily whispers into Midna’s ear, revealing a mouth that drips with saliva and split oddly…


Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[121][122] Like Final Fantasy VII, full motion video (FMV) sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series, although it still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques used in the previous two games.[122] Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2, and used the more powerful hardware to render graphics in real-time instead of using pre-rendered material to obtain a more dynamic look; the game features full 3D environments, rather than have 3D character models move about pre-rendered backgrounds. It is also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters.[19] This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[19][123]

The first game in the Mario Kart series is Super Mario Kart which was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1992. The development of the first game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, the Japanese video game designer who created the original Super Mario Bros., as well as many other successful games for Nintendo. Darran Jones of NowGamer suggests that the original success of Super Mario Kart was the result of including characters previously seen in Mario Bros. games, while also being a new type of racing game.[2]
Side special Default Crash Bomber 1% (loop), 4% (last) Fires a grappling bomb attached to a drill that latches on to any surface or fighter it touches, before exploding a few seconds later. Much like a Gooey Bomb, it can be transferred between players before it detonates but has a shorter timer and the explosion can be safely shielded. The bomb can travel a good distance until it disappears. Can be used to bait a shield grab, or shot against the stage while recovering to deny edgeguarding or extend Mega Man's own recovery. The move is based on Crash Man's weapon in Mega Man 2.
The next three titles would be released on PlayStation 2. Due to the more advanced technology, the games no longer relied on pre-rendered backgrounds, instead using the game engine to render the backgrounds immediately. Final Fantasy X improved in the facial expressions displayed by the characters, using skeletal animation technology and motion capture, to allow the characters to make more realistic lip movements to match the new voice acting, a first in the series which previously was restricted to text-based story telling. The following release, Final Fantasy XI, was the first in the series to use online multiplayer features, which was another expensive development project for the company.[23] Final Fantasy XII would later use only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X in exchange for improved lighting and texture rendering.[24]
In the early 2000s, Nintendo of America released a timeline on the official website of the series, which interpreted all stories up to the Oracle games as the adventures of a single protagonist named Link.[52] At one point, translator Dan Owsen and his coworkers at Nintendo of America had conceived another complete timeline and intended to make it available online. However, the Japanese series developers rejected the idea so the timeline would be kept open to the imagination of the players.[53]
The Legend of Zelda games feature a mixture of puzzles, action, adventure/battle gameplay, and exploration. These elements have remained constant throughout the series, but with refinements and additions featured in each new game. Later games in the series also include stealth gameplay, where the player must avoid enemies while proceeding through a level, as well as racing elements. Although the games can be beaten with a minimal amount of exploration and side quests, the player is frequently rewarded with helpful items or increased abilities for solving puzzles or exploring hidden areas. Some items are consistent and appear many times throughout the series (such as bombs and bomb flowers, which can be used both as weapons and to open blocked or hidden doorways; boomerangs, which can kill or paralyze enemies; keys for locked doors; magic swords, shields, and bows and arrows), while others are unique to a single game. Though the games contain many role-playing elements (Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is the only one to include an experience system), they emphasize straightforward hack and slash-style combat over the strategic, turn-based or active time combat of games like Final Fantasy. The game's role-playing elements, however, have led to much debate over whether or not the Zelda games should be classified as action role-playing games, a genre on which the series has had a strong influence.[1]
Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]

The majority of the music in the series—including the main recurring themes, and the full official soundtracks for the first ten games in the main series—was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, and has been praised as one of the greatest aspects of the series.[15][16][17] The music has had a broad musical palette, taking influences from classical symphonic music, heavy metal and techno-electronica.
Associated with the Goddess Nayru and the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda possesses keen insight and good judgment—although this does not always avail her in eschewing capture. Most of Zelda's incarnations are additionally gifted with innate psychic or magical potencies, such as telepathy and precognition. Albeit her gamut of abilities has yet to be revealed, Zelda has demonstrated the ability to cast spells, engender or annul barriers and seals, and shoot a bow. The source of most of these natural mystical powers could be explained by the presence of the Light Force, a power that is passed down through the Royal Family of Hyrule for generations. However Breath of the Wild implies the various incarnations of the Princess are descended from Hylia presumably through the Spirit Maiden from Skyward Sword indicating some of her powers may be divine in nature specifically her sealing powers and ability to communicate with spirits though these latent abilities must be awoken through ritual and devotion to Hylia according to legend though the Zelda of Breath of the Wild struggles despite years of dedicated training and only awakens them through selflessly trying to protect Link.
Mega Man will be returning along with all the past playable characters as part of this new game. In addition, his Mega Legends Final Smash has been updated to include both Proto Man and Bass as part of the attack. Unlike the previous game, Mega Man is no longer part of the starting roster and needs to be unlocked, since only the 8 characters from the original Super Smash Bros. will serve as the starting roster.[13]
Mario Kart Wii is a kart racing game featuring single-player and multiplayer modes. The players control of one of many selectable Mario franchise characters and participate in races or battles using karts or bikes on courses thematically based on locations from the Mario franchise. During gameplay, the player views the action from a third-person perspective that tracks the player from behind his or her kart. The player can perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, drifting, slipstreaming, and wheelies (bikes only).[3]
WatchMojo.com has frequently placed titles in the series in top ten lists, including top 10 JRPGs of all time*,[76] top 10 PSOne games*,[77] top ten PSOne RPGs*,[78] top ten PlayStation games of all time*,[79] and top ten Super Nintendo RPGs*.[80] The series held seven Guinness World Records in its Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, including "Most Games in an RPG Series", "Longest Development Period"* and "Fastest Selling Console RPG in a Single Day";[81] in the subsequent issue in 2009, two titles in the series featured in its top 50 console games*.[82]
Phantom Slash has been heavily reworked. The Phantom armor now assembles itself behind Zelda rather than appearing fully formed out of a portal in front of her. It is now a single-press chargeable move; Pressing B again will cause the incomplete armor to attack at its current charge level. The move has six charge levels, each resulting in a different attack:
The series has had multiple directors: Sakaguchi directed the first five installments, Yoshinori Kitase and Ito collaboratively directed Final Fantasy VI, and the two went on to direct many later installments on their own. Ito directed Final Fantasy IX and Final Fantasy XII, while Kitase developed Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X. After Final Fantasy X Kitase decided to stop directing but remained involved as a producer instead, choosing Motomu Toriyama as the director for Final Fantasy XIII and its sequels. The MMO releases have had multiple directors, though most recently, Naoki Yoshida has directed Final Fantasy XIV. Hajime Tabata started with directing spin-off games for portable gaming systems with Before Crisis -Final Fantasy VII- and Crisis Core -Final Fantasy VII-, but when Final Fantasy Versus XIII became Final Fantasy XV Tabata took over the role of director.

Ah ha ha, now this is funny. Apparently Mega Man X Legacy Collection is going to revert the Mega Man X5 Maverick names back to the ones used in the original game’s manual rather than the Guns N’ Roses names. But actually, if the preview videos are any guide, they’re taking it one step further and they’re actually translating the stray Japanese words into English equivalents like I did on the Game Hints page. For example, Spiral Pegacion officially becomes Spiral Pegasus (which is what he should have been named all along—in my humble opinion). I don’t yet have a list of all eight names but I’m sure that will be forthcoming because we’re getting really close to release day.
Which is kind of a shame. Because while the ability to slow down time is legitimately transformative—especially once you’ve picked up a few upgrades, allowing Mega Man to move at his normal speed while the rest of the world crawls along in digital molasses—it doesn’t change the fact that “biggest alterations to the Mega Man formula” hasn’t been a very competitive field in decades. A little extra bite might have knocked something interesting loose here, a different tone for a team that’s grown too comfortable playing a single note. On a fundamental level, these are games about learning and exploiting patterns, and despite a few flashes of brilliance, Capcom seems just as trapped in one of its own. The times have changed. Gaming has changed. Mega Man hasn’t.
Mega Man Battle Network, a series primarily on the Game Boy Advance, began in 2001 as a way for the Mega Man games to branch out into the role-playing video game market and to celebrate MegaMan's 15th anniversary. This series features a Net Navi called MegaMan.EXE. Net Navis act as virtual assistants to Operators, such as the protagonist Lan, an elementary school student and future hero who uses his Net Navi to help battle computer viruses and other Internet-based threats. The game combines elements from collectible card games to create a unique fast-paced battle system. An anime series, MegaMan NT Warrior, was also produced, ending with 209 episodes and a 50-minute film adaptation. Mega Man Network Transmission, the only entry in the series released on a home console rather than a handheld, takes place chronologically between the first two Battle Network games, although it was released between the third and fourth. It is also different from other games in the Battle Network universe in that its game play reminds strongly of the Classic series.
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
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