Princess Zelda was set to appear in the unreleased game Mystical Seed of Courage. In the game, she was to be the one responsible for managing the four seasons of Hyrule, in a role similar to Din's in Oracle of Seasons. She would be kidnapped by Ganon, which, along with the disappearance of the Rod of Seasons, would cause Hyrule's seasons to go out of control.
Time Trials – The player races alone in order to finish any course in the fastest time possible. The best time is then saved as a ghost, which the player can race against in later trials. Since Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, a new function called Staff Ghosts is introduced, Staff Ghosts are members of the Nintendo team that set staff times for one to try and beat. One's personal best has to be better than the staff time of a ghost in order to unlock Expert Staff Ghosts, which only appeared in Mario Kart Wii and Mario Kart 7, which in turn unlock characters, vehicles, or stamps, in addition to viewing ghost data.

Because of graphical limitations, the first games on the NES feature small sprite representations of the leading party members on the main world screen. Battle screens use more detailed, full versions of characters in a side-view perspective. This practice was used until Final Fantasy VI, which uses detailed versions for both screens. The NES sprites are 26 pixels high and use a color palette of 4 colors. 6 frames of animation are used to depict different character statuses like "healthy" and "fatigued". The SNES installments use updated graphics and effects, as well as higher quality audio than in previous games, but are otherwise similar to their predecessors in basic design. The SNES sprites are 2 pixels shorter, but have larger palettes and feature more animation frames: 11 colors and 40 frames respectively. The upgrade allowed designers to have characters be more detailed in appearance and express more emotions. The first game includes non-player characters (NPCs) the player could interact with, but they are mostly static in-game objects. Beginning with the second game, Square used predetermined pathways for NPCs to create more dynamic scenes that include comedy and drama.[114]
When Link goes Inside Hyrule Castle, he encounters a confrontation between Zelda and Yuga. Zelda tells Yuga that his actions must cease and asks him how many more people he intends to kidnap,[89] to which Yuga says he has been searching for all seven Sages of Hyrule.[90] Zelda then accuses him of attempting to use the Seven Sages to revive Ganon,[91] but Yuga ignores her and turns her into a Painting for her beauty.[92] He then takes her Painting to the highest point of Hyrule Castle and escapes to Lorule. In Lorule, he uses the power of the Seven Sages and Princess Zelda to revive Ganon and merges with Ganon before all the Paintings, save Zelda's, are scattered across Lorule. After Link frees the sages and assembles the Triforce, he and Zelda use it to restore the Lorulean Triforce.
Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.
Like the Super Mario series, the Mario Kart series has achieved successful sales with over 100 million copies sold in total.[20] Super Mario Kart has sold 8.76 million copies and is the fourth best-selling game on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System console.[14] Mario Kart 64 is the second-bestselling game for the Nintendo 64 (behind Super Mario 64), selling a total of 9.87 million copies.[14]Mario Kart: Double Dash has sold 6.96 million copies.[14] It is the second best-selling game on the GameCube (next to Super Smash Bros. Melee). Mario Kart Wii has achieved highly successful numbers, selling a total of 37.10 million copies.[16] It is the best-selling installment in the series and is the second best-selling game for the Wii (next to Wii Sports).[16] Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U, has shipped 1.2 million copies in North America and Europe combined on its first few days since launch, which was the console's fastest-selling game until the record was beaten by Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.[21][22] It sold a total of 8.42 million copies and is the Wii U's best-selling game.[18] In contrast, the enhanced port for the Nintendo Switch system, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, has sold 459,000 units in the United States in one day of its launch, making it the fastest-selling game in the series to date.[23] Deluxe sold a total of 10.35 million copies worldwide, outperforming the original Wii U version, and is the second-bestselling Nintendo Switch game of all time (behind Super Mario Odyssey).[19] Both versions sold a combined total of 18.77 million copies
Many games offer different systems to allow more freedom when growing characters' abilities and stats beginning as early as Final Fantasy II. Often this features a mix of the ability points system, in which points are used to grow abilities without being determined by a job. One of the popular systems is the Materia system featured in Final Fantasy VII and other games in its sub-series, where the player equips characters with Materia that contain various command or support abilities, and accumulating ability points allows the Materia to grow and gain stat boosts and new abilities. Similarly, the magicite featured in Final Fantasy VI allows the player to equip magicite remains of espers with the accumulated ability points allowing the characters to learn the magic spells they contain, and once reaching a certain threshold the character learns the ability permanently to use it even without the equipped magicite. This way the player can directly control which party members use which skills and customize their party to their preferred play style.

Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.
Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game.
The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][94] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
Associated with the Goddess Nayru and the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda possesses keen insight and good judgment—although this does not always avail her in eschewing capture. Most of Zelda's incarnations are additionally gifted with innate psychic or magical potencies, such as telepathy and precognition. Albeit her gamut of abilities has yet to be revealed, Zelda has demonstrated the ability to cast spells, engender or annul barriers and seals, and shoot a bow. The source of most of these natural mystical powers could be explained by the presence of the Light Force, a power that is passed down through the Royal Family of Hyrule for generations. However Breath of the Wild implies the various incarnations of the Princess are descended from Hylia presumably through the Spirit Maiden from Skyward Sword indicating some of her powers may be divine in nature specifically her sealing powers and ability to communicate with spirits though these latent abilities must be awoken through ritual and devotion to Hylia according to legend though the Zelda of Breath of the Wild struggles despite years of dedicated training and only awakens them through selflessly trying to protect Link.
Though it’s also on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, I felt compelled to first play Mega Man 11 on a Nintendo system, where the majority of the Mega Man games have lived. Here’s what you need to know about playing Mega Man 11 on Nintendo Switch: Unfortunately, there’s a small, but significant flaw in that the Y and B buttons on the right Joy-Con are too near the right thumbstick, and the classic Mega Man players’ pattern of shooting and jumping simultaneously can result in some accidental hits of the right thumbstick, which by default changes your weapons (you can turn this stick function off). Additionally, not having a D-pad on the left Joy-Con stinks. I also experienced some incorrect button signals getting to the television when playing in docked mode. Thankfully, all of this can be circumvented by using the Pro Controller (if you have one).

Rather than just continuing to run, jump, and shoot, I sometimes found myself having to stop and figure out how to proceed forward, and other times being forced to move forward without having this chance and just dying over and over while I figure it out. I am actually thankful there are at least difficulty options because after an hour on the first level playing on Normal, I finally had to lower the difficulty to Casual. The reason for this is my next problem which is the LENGTH of levels. They just feel too long under the standard Mega Man rules. A single checkpoint in the middle is not enough when the levels are this long and complex. Thankfully Casual gives you more lives and checkpoints, but considering I beat the other games without this option, I felt a little sad to have to resort to this.


Games in The Legend of Zelda series frequently feature in-game musical instruments, particularly in musical puzzles, which are widespread.[2] Often, instruments trigger game events: for example, the recorder in The Legend of Zelda can reveal secret areas, as well as warp Link to the Dungeon entrances. This warping with music feature has also been used in A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening. In Ocarina of Time, playing instruments is a core part of the game, with the player needing to play the instrument through the use of the game controller to succeed.[3] Ocarina of Time is "[one of the] first contemporary non-dance title[s] to feature music-making as part of its gameplay",[4] using music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to utilise songs to progress in the game[5] – a game mechanic that is also present in Majora's Mask.[6]
In 1994, near the end of the Famicom's lifespan, the original Famicom game was re-released in cartridge format.[60] A modified version, BS Zelda no Densetsu, was released for the Super Famicom's satellite-based expansion, Satellaview, on August 6, 1995, in Japan. A second Satellaview game, BS Zelda no Densetsu MAP2 was released for the Satellaview on December 30, 1995. Both games featured rearranged dungeons, an altered overworld, and new voice-acted plot-lines.[61]
Every game in the main Zelda series has consisted of three principal areas: an overworld in which movement is multidirectional, allowing the player some degree of freedom of action; areas of interaction with other characters (merely caves or hidden rooms in the first game, but expanding to entire towns and cities in subsequent games) in which the player gains special items or advice; and dungeons, areas of labyrinthine layout, usually underground, comprising a wide range of difficult enemies, bosses, and items. Each dungeon usually has one major item inside, which is usually essential for solving many of the puzzles within that dungeon and often plays a crucial role in defeating that dungeon's boss, as well as progressing through the game. In nearly every Zelda game, navigating a dungeon is aided by locating a map, which reveals its layout, and a magic compass, which reveals the location of significant and smaller items such as keys and equipment. In later games, the series includes a special "big key" that will unlock the door to battle the dungeon's boss enemy and open the item chest.

As the last free descendant, Zelda uses telepathy to contact the descendant of the Knights of Hyrule, Link, to save her.[32] Despite his efforts in evacuating her from Hyrule Castle, Agahnim manages to capture Zelda and sacrifice her to the Dark World, breaking the seal between Hyrule and the Dark World.[80][81] While in the Dark World, Princess Zelda is held inside a crystal prison within Turtle Rock.[82] When Link frees her, she, along with the other maidens, breaks the seal surrounding Ganon's lair.[83]


Realizing that it would be very difficult for the armies to stop Wily, Dr. Light knew something had to be done. Rock, having a strong sense of justice, volunteered to be converted from his current state as a lab assistant into a fighting robot, or rather, a super fighting robot. Thus, on May 25,[10] he became known as "Mega Man" (Rockman in Japan).
In The Minish Cap, Princess Zelda is known to sneak out of the castle to visit her good childhood friend, Link.[57] At the beginning of the game, Link and Zelda head together towards the Picori Festival in Hyrule Castle Town.[58] A catastrophe occurs when the evil wind mage, Vaati, appears and turns Zelda to stone, breaking the Picori Blade in the process. Link fuses the four elements to transform the blade into the Four Sword to reverse Vaati's spell. When Link saves Princess Zelda atop the roof of Hyrule Castle where she was being imprisoned by Vaati to steal the Light Force within her, she reveals to Link that she saw visions of him, as if in a dream.[59] However, soon after this, the castle begins to collapse.[60] As Link and Zelda head towards the Elemental Sanctuary, Vaati appears again and is subsequently defeated by Link. The Mage's Cap falls down and Ezlo, now a Minish again, urges Princess Zelda to make a wish. Princess Zelda thus wishes for Hyrule to return to its usual, peaceful state, making all the monsters disappear and returning its people back to normal.[61]
Mario Kart Wii is a kart racing game featuring single-player and multiplayer modes. The players control of one of many selectable Mario franchise characters and participate in races or battles using karts or bikes on courses thematically based on locations from the Mario franchise. During gameplay, the player views the action from a third-person perspective that tracks the player from behind his or her kart. The player can perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, drifting, slipstreaming, and wheelies (bikes only).[3]
Following the Japanese launch of F-Zero, a Super Nintendo Entertainment System game which was exclusively single-player, Nintendo developers decided to create a two-player racing game for that console as a follow-up.[1] They made a prototype that featured a generic "guy in overalls"; it was decided that Mario characters and concepts be included when the developers added Mario driving one of the karts, out of curiosity as to how the game would look, and were satisfied with it.[1] Thus, the Mario Kart series was born, with its first title, Super Mario Kart, released for the SNES on August 27, 1992. Development of the first Mario Kart game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, then the general manager of Nintendo's EAD division, who is best known for creating the Mario franchise and other successful Nintendo properties. Darran Jones of Imagine Publishing's magazine NowGamer attributed the original success of Mario Kart to its use of the Mario characters and to being a new type of racing game.[2]

Mario Kart: Double Dash!! features co-operative LAN play and two-player karts.[3] It also introduces eleven new playable characters (Princess Daisy, Birdo, Baby Mario, Baby Luigi, Paratroopa, Diddy Kong, Bowser Jr., Waluigi, Toadette, Petey Piranha, and King Boo). The game also features special items that are specific to each character. Finally, this game introduced unlockable characters and karts to the series.
I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.

Because they had a good relationship with Tetra, they also quickly warmed up to her granddaughter Zelda when she asked for their help. They could also for some unexplained reason, see her even in her spirit form. They have stated Zelda's resemblance to Tetra whom they thought was an intelligent person. Even Byrne was moved by Zelda's words as he sacrificed himself to save New Hyrule despite his earlier intentions. Both Link and Zelda in turn were relieved to hear that Byrne was not truly dead. The Lokomos asked the duo to watch the land in there place, showing that they trust their Hylian allies.
"The Legend of Zelda Theme" is a recurring piece of music that was created for the first game of the franchise. The composer and sound director of the series, Koji Kondo, initially planned to use Maurice Ravel's Boléro as the game's title theme, but was forced to change it when he learned, late in the game's development cycle, that the copyright for the orchestral piece had not yet expired. As a result, Kondo wrote a new arrangement of the overworld theme within one day.[7] The "Zelda Theme" has topped ScrewAttack's "Top Ten Videogame Themes Ever" list.[8]
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