In 1995, Square showed an interactive SGI technical demonstration of Final Fantasy VI for the then next generation of consoles. The demonstration used Silicon Graphics's prototype Nintendo 64 workstations to create 3D graphics.[114][115] Fans believed the demo was of a new Final Fantasy game for the Nintendo 64 console; however, 1997 saw the release of Final Fantasy VII for the Sony PlayStation.[115][116] The switch was due to a dispute with Nintendo over its use of faster but more expensive cartridges, as opposed to the slower and cheaper, but much higher capacity Compact Discs used on rival systems.[117][118] Final Fantasy VII introduced 3D graphics with fully pre-rendered backgrounds.[117][119] It was because of this switch to 3D that a CD-ROM format was chosen over a cartridge format.[117][120] The switch also led to increased production costs and a greater subdivision of the creative staff for Final Fantasy VII and subsequent 3D games in the series.[72]
No level is the same, and their motifs match the Robot Master who rules that domain. You can choose the order in which you tackle stages, and each Robot Master gives Mega Man a new power upon being defeated, opening up new strategies for subsequent levels. There’s lots of fun to be had with trial and error, figuring out which boss to face first and which powers will defeat the next Robot Master faster. Sometimes it’s as easy as Bubble Man’s power (water) defeating Heat Man (fire) but some get more obscure, especially in the later Mega Man games.
With Ganon sealed away, Zelda and Link then embark on a journey to try and fix Hyrule piece by piece, starting by visiting King Dorephan to give him closure over Mipha's death. Zelda remarks that she feels her powers dwindling as she cannot hear the voice of the Master Sword anymore. However, she says that she is okay with that now, and can accept the fact that her powers are going to disappear shortly. She and Link then walk towards their horses to begin their new adventure. Presumably she, Link, Paya, Impa, Purah, Robbie, Dorephan, Prince Sidon, Gerudo Chieftain Riju, Daruk's descendant Yunobo, Goron Patriarch Bludo, Teba, and Rito Elder Kaneli work together to rebuild Hyrule after Ganon's defeat. She presumably visited King Dorephan to seek his assistance in helping Zelda take the Hyrulean throne as some Hyruleans may doubt she is the 117 year old Zelda as she had not physically aged since sealing Calamity Ganon, though King Dorephan and the Zora could help Zelda prove her legitimacy along with Impa, Purah, and Robbie.

Link rescues Zelda and takes her into the Sanctuary, where she remains under the protection of the Loyal Sage for part of the game. After Link retrieves the Master Sword from the Lost Woods, Zelda is kidnapped by Agahnim's henchmen and sent to the Dark World in his final ritual, breaking the seal. She is not seen again until she is rescued by Link from Turtle Rock. Saving her and the other six maidens opens the entrance to Ganon's Tower, the final dungeon of the game. Zelda is last seen together with her revived father in the end credits sequence. It is hinted in the Oracle games and A Link Between Worlds that this Zelda became intimate with Link later on.
In 2001, under license from Nintendo, Capcom cancelled the release of The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage for Game Boy Color. Working with a Capcom team, Yoshiki Okamoto was originally tasked with designing a series of three Zelda games for the Game Boy Color.[104] Referred to as the "Triforce Series",[105] the games were known as The Legend of Zelda: The Mysterious Acorn: Chapter of Power, Chapter of Wisdom, and Chapter of Courage in Japan[106] and The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Power, Mystical Seed of Wisdom, and Mystical Seed of Courage in the US.[107] The games were to interact using a password system,[105] but the limitations of this system and the difficulty of coordinating three games proved too complicated, so the team scaled back to two games at Miyamoto's suggestion.[108][109] The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons was adapted from Mystical Seed of Power, The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages was adapted from Mystical Seed of Wisdom, and Mystical Seed of Courage was cancelled.[105]
The first game in the Mario Kart series is Super Mario Kart which was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1992. The development of the first game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, the Japanese video game designer who created the original Super Mario Bros., as well as many other successful games for Nintendo. Darran Jones of NowGamer suggests that the original success of Super Mario Kart was the result of including characters previously seen in Mario Bros. games, while also being a new type of racing game.[2]
-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.
Every time a new Zelda game comes around, I can’t wait to explore its dungeons. There’s just something about that feeling of progression– collecting keys, opening chests, solving puzzles, tackling larger-than-life bosses– that speaks to me. It’s certainly no coincidence that my favorite Zelda entries are those with the strongest dungeons. Indeed, for many fans, these sections have been an integral part of the series. That said, not every dungeon receives a ton of love. From Ocarina of Time’s Water…
Mega Man set out to stop Wily and his robots again, who had stolen the new parts developed by Dr. Light and kidnapped Roll. If the player decides to pursue Wily, Mega Man will mention that Wily's scheming has ended, and then moves in close, presumably to apprehend him. However, he then reacts in shock when he discovers that "Wily" was in fact a mechanical duplicate. If the player decides to rescue Roll, Roll will apologize for worrying Mega Man before revealing she managed to steal some energy from the Wily Robot. In Mega Man's ending, Mega Man says he will bring peace for both humans and robots, and Dr. Wily informs Mega Man that he is no different than him, as he destroyed Wily's robots. Mega Man is in disbelief with what Wily said, but Dr. Light, Roll, and Auto appear to cheer him. Proto Man also appears if he was his partner. Mega Man starts feeling better, but Wily uses their distraction to escape again, and Mega Man starts to pursue him. His cooperative mode ending with Bass has him forced into a battle with Bass shortly after stopping Wily, despite both being significantly injured due to Bass wanting to fulfill his directive, although the conclusion is never revealed. In his cooperative mode ending with Duo, he wishes Duo luck as he proceeds to leave the planet with the energy.
On to the good, I really love the art style of this game which feels like a cartoon come to life, something which they were moving closer to on 8 and then backtracked from on 9 and 10. The design of everything is just spot on and I really love the creativity on display as well as the fact that this feels like it has an actual story (something the X games aimed for but the core series usually lacked). The controls are smooth and responsive as they should be in any good Mega Man game and this helps to offset the difficulty of some levels (as does the store which has a lot of helpful items to allow the game to be as hard or easy as you choose to make it).

Throughout the lifespan of The Legend of Zelda series, a number of games (including main series games as well as re-releases and spin-offs) in varying states of completeness have had their releases cancelled. Perhaps the earliest of these was Gottlieb's The Legend of Zelda Pinball Machine (cancelled 1993). After securing a license from Nintendo to produce two Nintendo-franchise-based pinball machines, pinball designer Jon Norris was tasked with designing the table. Before it was completed, Gottlieb decided to repurpose the game with an American Gladiators theme. Licensing for this version ultimately fell through and the game was released as simply Gladiators (November 1993).[103]

Character concept artwork was handled by Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy VI who also handled logo and promotional image designs for games to follow. He was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura from Final Fantasy VII onwards (with the exception of Final Fantasy IX—where it was handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana and Shin Nagasawa—and Final Fantasy XII—where it was handled by Akihiko Yoshida).
Mega Man (ロックマン, Rockman) is a newcomer in Super Smash Bros. 4. He was announced at Nintendo's E3 2013 Direct Conference presentation for the game, becoming the first-revealed of the six third-party characters in the game along with SEGA's Sonic and Bayonetta, Bandai Namco's Pac-Man, fellow Capcom character Ryu, and Square Enix's Cloud. He does not widely use hand-to-hand combat, instead relying on the large arsenal of ranged weaponry he has amassed by defeating boss characters in his own games. His sound effects are reused from the vast number of retro Mega Man games he has appeared in.

Several video games have either been adapted into or have had spin-offs in the form of manga and novels. The first was the novelization of Final Fantasy II in 1989, and was followed by a manga adaptation of Final Fantasy III in 1992.[62][63] The past decade has seen an increase in the number of non-video game adaptations and spin-offs. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within has been adapted into a novel, the spin-off game Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles has been adapted into a manga, and Final Fantasy XI has had a novel and manga set in its continuity.[64][65][66][67] Seven novellas based on the Final Fantasy VII universe have also been released. The Final Fantasy: Unlimited story was partially continued in novels and a manga after the anime series ended.[68] The Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII series have also had novellas and audio dramas released. Two games, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance and Final Fantasy: Unlimited, have been adapted into radio dramas.
Skyward Sword has several noticeable romantic moments between Link and Zelda. Early in the story, Zelda wants Link to be the first to see her outfit for the Wing Ceremony. She worries over him and she does not want him to fail at becoming a knight. When Link's Crimson Loftwing is hidden by Groose, Zelda assists Link in finding his Loftwing. After Link wins the Wing Ceremony, Zelda jumps off the ledge and Link catches her almost as if she was expecting him to. She then congratulates him on winning. Afterwards, Zelda mentions that she is very happy to be atop the Statue of the Goddess with him. She also gets extremely close to him and almost implies that the two are to kiss, before she pushes him off the statue. Afterward, Zelda bashfully asks Link to go out flying, which they do. She then tells Link how amazing the day was, and that she would remember it forever.

Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]

As the series progressed, various other player characters have appeared, such as fellow Maverick Hunter Zero who was created by Dr. Wily of the Classic series, OVER-1, created jointly by Dr. Light and Dr. Cossack, and Axl, a Reploid with an adolescent personality who has the ability to shape-shift into other Reploids. Zero would later star in his own spin-off series, Mega Man Zero.


The Legends series concluded with only two main games and a spin-off starring mainstay antagonist Tron Bonne before being discontinued. Unlike Battle Network and Zero, the final game in the series does not resolve the storyline. A continuation to the Legends series has become an oft-requested game among many Capcom and Mega Man fans. A third game was once under development for the Nintendo 3DS, but on July 17, 2011, Capcom cancelled the project saying it did not meet certain requirements. This decision was met with criticism from fans and gaming news outlets.[3][4]
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