Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.
Princess Zelda plays a much larger role in Spirit Tracks than in previous installments, as she herself also aids Link in the salvation of Hyrule. Near the beginning of the game, Link travels to Hyrule Castle to see Zelda and become an official train conductor. Because he is an engineer and the apprentice of Alfonzo, who was once the head of the castle guard, Zelda asks Link to secretly meet her in her quarters later to discuss something with him. Zelda explains to Link that she needs to get to the Tower of Spirits to personally investigate the disappearance of the Spirit Tracks, which she attributes to something that Chancellor Cole is hiding.
Spirit Tracks features several moments that can be interpreted romantically. Early in the game during the Graduation Ceremony, Zelda walks into the room in front of Link, who is bowing down respectfully. Link then looks up and gasps, blushing at her in amazement. He is then scolded by Chancellor Cole for raising his head without permission. Later, when Zelda's spirit is separated from her body following the first encounter with Chancellor Cole and Byrne, Link is the only one who can see her besides the Lokomos, demonstrating a clear and strong bond between himself and the Princess. After Zelda and Link defeat Byrne in the Tower of Spirits, Byrne, disbelieving, comments that he was beaten by two mortals. Zelda, while still possessing a Phantom, says that when she and Link combine their strength, no one can defeat them. Link turns to her, surprised. The background turns white and Zelda's Lullaby plays as they both laugh and high-five, gazing at each other all the while.
Um dies zu bewerkstelligen, gilt es, eine Vielzahl an Verliesen zu erkunden und Bosse zu besiegen. Dabei darf die Suche nach neuen Gegenständen und Schätzen natürlich nicht unterschätzt werden. Die Welt ist vollgepackt mit Abenteuern, die es zu bestehen gilt! Obwohl die unterschiedlichen Spiele zu verschiedenen Zeiten und später sogar an neuen Handlungsorten spielen, wird The Legend of Zelda immer thematisch zusammengehalten.
Another common theme is rebellion. The protagonists are often forced to fight a higher power either on a quest for revenge, for freedom or another motivation. The higher power can range from an empire, such as the Gestahlian Empire from Final Fantasy VI, a religion, such as Yevon from Final Fantasy X, or a deity, such as the fal'Cie from Final Fantasy XIII. During the journey to vanquish these powers their threat escalates, until the protagonists free the world of the oppressor(s).
Zelda Month has come and gone much too quickly. But for those who might’ve missed it, PeanutButterGamer (PBG) released his final video for the month just over a week ago. PGB, who started Zelda Month in 2011, puts a twist on his traditional videos with a Zelda product review. In the video, he takes some of the most interesting Zelda items from eBay and, in usual PBG spirit, reviews them with a kooky flair and comical hijinks. Give it a…
After the events of Mega Man II, Dr. Wily took control of an off-shore oil platform with some of his powerful Robot Masters. Once again, Dr. Light sends Mega Man to investigate and stop them before it gets out of hand. Mega Man takes down the first four Robot Masters and makes his way to the Wily Castle, where he discovers that four more Robot Masters await him. After defeating them, he encounters a new Mega Man Killer named Punk in the Wily Station, whose Screw Crusher delivers a crushing blow to its opponents. However, Mega Man promptly defeats Punk and defeats Wily with Punk's own weapon.
The addition will certainly benefit newcomers, because Mega Man 11 is difficult. I’ve spent hours mastering each stage, making slow but satisfying progress as I memorize enemy placement and boss attack patterns. Some levels and Robot Masters, however, are maddeningly hard on normal, particularly sections of the game with instant kills. More than a few times, a one-hit-kill mechanism, like a column of flame or a screen-sized Wily-built death machine, will chase Mega Man through a level. Making your way through a tricky section only to be steamrolled by one of these pursuing instant death dealers is never fun.
Nintendo GameCube Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, released in 2003 for the Nintendo GameCube, introduced a number of new gameplay features. The most prominent feature is co-op gameplay with two riders per kart, where one player drives and the other uses items. This is also the first game to allow everyone to move on regardless of which position they earned after each race. In addition to 9 of the 10 characters who return from previous installments (excluding Donkey Kong Jr.), 11 new playable characters are added: Diddy Kong, Bowser Jr., Birdo, Princess Daisy, Waluigi, Koopa Paratroopa, babies Mario and Luigi, Petey Piranha, King Boo, and the newly-created Toadette. Each pair of drivers is assigned their own unique special item (e.g. fireballs for Mario and Luigi, or giant bananas for Donkey and Diddy Kong). Individual characters also gain their own unique custom-designed karts. Another new addition is the "All-Cup Tour," which has the player race in every track at the same time; once this is cleared on the highest difficulty setting, the player can unlock a "Parade Kart," which can be used by any character of any weight.

The first three titles where developed on the 8bit Nintendo Entertainment System while the next three were developed on the 16bit Super Nintendo Entertainment System. These games were two-dimensional and used sprites to depict characters and enemies on screen. The enemies in battle would have more detailed sprites that more closely resembled their artwork, but far fewer animations. The character sprites had several frames of animations, as well as different sprites based on their various statuses or weapons equipped, but were less detailed. Field sprites were less detailed than battle sprites. Though the SNES allowed games to have greater graphics and use higher-quality music with more instrumentation, the games were mostly the same format and similarly basic.
^ Nintendo (November 18, 2011). The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. Wii. Nintendo. Demise: I will rise again. Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero... They are eternally bound to this curse. An incarnation of my hatred shall ever follow your kind, dooming them to wander a blood-soaked sea of darkness for all time!

Mario Kart Wii's Battle mode is similar to that seen in previous installments in which players drive around an enclosed arena and attack each other using items. The players are divided into two teams, red and blue, and teammates cannot harm each other with their items. There are two variants of Battle mode available: Balloon Battle and Coin Runners. In Balloon Battle, each player's kart has three attached balloons. A player gains a point each time they pop or steal a balloon belonging to an opposing team player, but loses a point each time they lose all balloons. In Coin Runners, the players collect coins scattered throughout the arena and attack opposing team members to make them drop coins. The team that has accumulated the most points or coins total when the three-minute time limit expires wins.[7]


There’s a cleverness and care that seems infused throughout Mega Man 11, and numerous creative touches surprised me as I played. Bounce Man’s rubbery body is flecked with bits of metallic confetti, like a bouncy ball from a toy vending machine. Block Man’s level is inspired by Mayan art and architecture, supporting the robot’s backstory in which he fantasizes about building his own temple. Each of the game’s new Robot Masters is given dozens of catchphrases and punny quips. “Prepare to diode!” Fuse Man will say, appealing to my inner dad joke enthusiast.
Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the death of her people. Subsequently, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle, although unlike her people, she does not become a spirit under the influence of the Twilight (possibly due to her implied possession of the Triforce of Wisdom). It is here that she meets Link, transformed into a wolf by the Twilight's power, though their conversation is cut short due to the arrival of her guard.
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][94] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][116] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[100][117] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][116][120] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[206]
Following the Japanese launch of F-Zero, a Super Nintendo Entertainment System game which was exclusively single-player, Nintendo developers decided to create a two-player racing game for that console as a follow-up.[1] They made a prototype that featured a generic "guy in overalls"; it was decided that Mario characters and concepts be included when the developers added Mario driving one of the karts, out of curiosity as to how the game would look, and were satisfied with it.[1] Thus, the Mario Kart series was born, with its first title, Super Mario Kart, released for the SNES on August 27, 1992. Development of the first Mario Kart game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, then the general manager of Nintendo's EAD division, who is best known for creating the Mario franchise and other successful Nintendo properties. Darran Jones of Imagine Publishing's magazine NowGamer attributed the original success of Mario Kart to its use of the Mario characters and to being a new type of racing game.[2]

Neutral special Default Metal Blade 3% (usage), 5% (as item) A spinning saw blade projectile that can be thrown in one of eight different directions. The blade can be picked up and thrown by players like a regular item, and it deals greater damage upon being thrown a second time. Mega Man cannot throw another Metal Blade until his previous one disappears. Its fair amount of utility makes this Mega Man's most useful tool for edgeguarding, approaching and spacing, and can even initiate shield break combos. The move is based on Metal Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.
The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
While driving, the player collects power-ups from item boxes placed in various points on the track. These power-ups allow the player to attack opponents, causing them to slow down or spin out of control; defend against such attacks; or gain boosts in speed. These include the series staple items, such as the Mushroom, Koopa shell projectiles, the Starman, and banana peels. There are also three new items: the Mega Mushroom, Thunder Cloud, and POW Block. The Mega Mushroom temporarily grows the player to an enormous size and allows them to flatten opposing karts, the POW Block causes all racers ahead of the user to spin out and drop their items if used (unless they dodge it by being mid-air or shaking the Wii Remote), and the Thunder Cloud gives the recipient a speed boost and off road capabilities, but the recipient has to collide with other racers to pass it onto them before the item delivers a shock, shrinking them to a tiny size.
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.
K'Nex produced sets with tracks from the game and figures of Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, and Bowser in karts and bikes. These have been released to promote Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7, and Mario Kart 8. McDonald's released an eight-character set of Happy Meal toys based on Mario Kart 8, where the characters' karts were customizable with stickers. Nintendo itself has also offered Mario Kart-related merchandise, such as a soundtrack for Mario Kart 64 offered by mail; and varying pieces of merchandise through the Club Nintendo customer rewards program, such as a Mario Kart Wii-themed stopwatch, gold trophies modeled after those in Mario Kart 7, and a CD featuring the soundtrack of Mario Kart 8.

Happy Monday, everybody! I know I keep forgetting to post a Caption Contest every week, but I could not, under any circumstance, miss this week of all weeks. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate releases this Friday, and I’m sure the entire Nintendo fanbase is looking for a way to alleviate the anticipation. So why not let the Zelda Dungeon Caption Contest distract you for a little while as you wait for Ultimate to hit store shelves?
The series' most basic plots revolve around the cast fighting an antagonist who aims to destroy or conquer the world while coping with their own struggles. The characters are often part of a small resistance against one or more larger powers, and each tend to have different motivations within their own groups. There is a sense of desperation, as the characters fight for everything they hold dear. The plots vary from being overall light-hearted, such as Final Fantasy III or Final Fantasy V, to being more grim and realistic, such as Final Fantasy II or Final Fantasy VII, though many, such as Final Fantasy IX and Final Fantasy XIV, are a mix.
In 1998, Nintendo cancelled The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Ura. Originally intended as an expansion disk for Ocarina of Time on the Nintendo 64DD, poor sales figures for the N64DD system led Nintendo to cancel its plans for the release. In 2002, Nintendo released a bonus disc called The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest. It contained emulated versions of Ocarina of Time and Ocarina of Time Master Quest with a number of modifications originally planned for release in Ocarina of Time Ura including GUI textures and text modified to reflect the GameCube.[citation needed]
Gifted with a perfectly serviceable faux-3D makeover, and a plot that couldn’t matter less if it tried, 11 once again pits its robot hero against the forces of the cartoonishly nasty Dr. Wily. Said battle comes in the form of eight new stages to run and gun through, with eight new bosses lurking at their ends. Despite boilerplate names like Block Man, Impact Man, and Torch Man, this is easily the most colorful bunch of baddies the series has ever offered up, varying wildly in size, and featuring sharp little details like the electrodes poking jauntily out of Fuse Man’s silhouette. That same love has been lavished on the way they fight, too: Rather than execute a few simple patterns of jumps and attacks, each boss battle is now a multi-phase affair, with enemies tossing out super moves and even the occasional full-on transformation. All of these flashy theatrics—which put a welcome edge onto the long-standard process of learning and overcoming a boss—are empowered by the Double Gear system, the game’s one big contribution to the Mega Man canon. A fancy way of saying “short-lived bursts of extra power or speed,” the Gears’ powers aren’t just confined to your enemies. They’re also the biggest tool in Mega Man’s new arsenal—and in the game’s efforts to justify its existence as more than just a pleasant but brief nostalgic stint.
In 1990, a junior novel version of Mega Man 2 was released as part of the Worlds of Power novel series. Mega Man is turned human by Dr. Light during an accident in a machine designed to clone Mega Man. Instead of a Mega Buster, human Mega Man uses a hand gun and instead of being able to copy the robot master's weapons, he instead takes them off of their arms. For some reason being human does not affect him much and he is still able to consume E-drinks (Energy Tanks) and gain a power boost. The book follows the general plot of Mega Man 2 and even provides game hints at the end of some chapters.
@ryancraddock With Switch, compared to other systems the physical versus digital matter is a lot more significant since there's very limited space for games at high cost, digitally, one has to be choosy with digital acquisitions. Ultimately physical buyers are going to be able to buy a lot more games. And WoFF is a relatively large game in terms of SD usage.

As usual, Mega Man destroys the latest incarnation of the Wily Machine, leaving Wily on the ground begging for forgiveness. As Mega Man berates Wily for trying the same old ruse after so many failures, he is taken over by the Evil Energy in Wily's machine as the tower collapsed around them. However, Duo saved Mega Man and destroyed the evil energy within him. He leaves before Mega Man wakes up, but Proto Man informs him of Duo's final message to the Blue Bomber: "Thank you".

The Final Fantasy series has now grown to 15 core games, along with over dozens of spin-offs, sequels, remakes, ports, movies, and more. Final Fantasy I was first released in 1987 (JP), now coming up to Square Enix's 30th anniversary, Final Fantasy XV awaits to be released for the upcoming XBOX One and PS4. The popularity of the franchise continues to grow as it continues to pave the road in RPG creativity and innovation. As the series continues to expand, the complete game list below will be updated accordingly.


The voice acting is surprisingly good. For fans of previous games in the series the voice acting has been laughably bad (especially Mega Man 8), but here they sound really good and well delivered. I wish I could say the same for the music. It's not bad, it just doesn't always feel like Mega Man music. A lot of it has this techno and electronica vibe. It's competent but there's nothing here that sticks out as well Wily's Fortress in Mega Man 2, the entirety of Mega Man 9's soundtrack or anything even coming close to some of the tracks you've heard in other Mega Man games. The music overall can be relaxing but you're not likely to find them sticking too firmly in your mind when all is said and done.
Genau wie im EMP Zelda Online Shop, in dem Zelda Fanartikel zu allen Teilen der Reihe angeboten werden, kann man die Reihe nach ihren bekanntesten Spielen gliedern. Nach The Legend of Zelda sorgte im Jahre 1991 der Super-Nintendo-Ableger „A Link to the Past“ für Furore. Dieser Titel gilt aufgrund der zeitlosen Grafik und einem ansprechendem Gameplay als besonders herausragend.
The majority of the games are stand-alone stories with unique characters, scenarios and settings, though several spin-offs and sequels to main series games continue stories within the same worlds. The series is defined by its recurring gameplay mechanics, themes and features. Commonly recurring features include the series' "mascot" creature, chocobos, that are often used as steeds; a character named Cid who is usually associated with engineering; moogles, cute flying creatures that often aid the player by facilitating some of the game mechanics; the mythology-based summoned creatures that can be called forth to aid players in battle and also commonly battled as bosses; the job system where playable characters are defined by their job class; and the active time battle system, an evolution of the classic turn-based system common for JRPGs where the units' speed determines how many actions they can take.
 Phantom Slash's fully charged attack is now momentarily delayed, allowing Zelda to move around before the Phantom rushes forward. Zelda can set it as a trap and attack the opponent in tandem with the Phantom, or she can retreat behind it for protection. This also discourages the opponent from reflecting the Phantom since she now has enough time to respond with Nayru's Love.

Mega Man was seen as a very obscure and unorthodox character since the game's release. His strange playstyle mainly comprised of projectiles always saw a large topic of debate for him, though the general consensus was always of him being at least a mid-tier character. Alongside very limited tournament representation and tournament results, he would at first rank 28th on the first 4BR tier list. However, his popularity would become stronger after game updates nerfed Sheik, Zero Suit Samus and Bayonetta, and his tournament representation, while limited, saw strong results from smashers like ScAtt, Smasher1001, and most notably Kameme, who would travel to the USA to compete at EVO 2016 and get 2nd place at the tournament. This spike in tournament results allowed him to be seen much more favorably and allowed him to rank 15th on the second tier list, reassesing him as a high-tier character and gaining the third largest rise between the first and second tier lists.
The Mario Kart series has received widespread critical and fan acclaim. On Metacritic, all entries in the series hold aggregate review scores of 82 to 91 out of 100, except for Super Mario Kart, which was never reviewed there. On GameRankings, all eight main Mario Kart installments hold very high approval ratings, ranging from 82% (Mario Kart Wii) to 94% (Super Mario Kart). The Mario Kart games have also been praised by many other gaming reviews publishers including Edge, IGN, The Age, GameSpot, and Official Nintendo Magazine among others. In its 250th issue, Nintendo Power stated that the series was one of the greatest multiplayer experiences, citing the diversity in game modes as well as the overall entertainment value.[11] The Mario Kart series has also been lauded by the Guinness Book of World Records, which gave it six records including "First Console Kart Racing Game," "Best Selling Racing Game," and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise," while also naming its SNES debut game the top console game of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[12]
MegaMan.EXE and Zero both appear as bonus playable characters in the fighting game Onimusha Blade Warriors, while a different version of Mega Man, based on his appearance on the American box art of the first game, appears as a playable fighter in the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita versions of Street Fighter X Tekken. Mega Man Volnutt and Roll also make an appearance in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars, with Zero added to the U.S. version. In 2013, Mega Man is a playable character in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and it's sequel, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.[6] An amiibo based on his appearance was confirmed on November 11, and can be utilized in Super Smash Bros. as well as Mario Kart 8 where it can be scanned to unlock a costume for the player's Mii based on Mega Man's. In Super Mario Maker, the player can unlock a Mega Man costume by scanning the character's amiibo.[citation needed]
Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
Jump up ↑ "When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand... Together with the Hero of Time, the awakened ones will bind the evil and return the light of peace to the world..." — Sheik (Ocarina of Time)
Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)
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