Worried about the seal on Vaati, Zelda goes with six other mystical maidens to check on the Sanctuary of the Four Sword, and Link accompanies her. Something goes horribly wrong, however, and a dark shadowy Link attacks them. Link is forced to draw the Four Sword to fight Shadow Link, and Vaati escapes. The girls are abducted, and the Links come to their rescue. Zelda helps them defeat Shadow Link, and after Vaati is dispatched, the five quickly flee the collapsing Tower of Winds. Finally, the Links face Ganon, who is behind the catastrophe, and Zelda helps them deliver the final blow.

In 2002, a follow-up series to the Mega Man X franchise was developed for the Game Boy Advance which starred Zero, a character created for the Mega Man X series as a sidekick/ally of Mega Man. The series revolved around Zero battling a powerful human-supremacy force as he protects the oppressed remaining reploids. In the Mega Man Zero series, the gameplay is largely similar to Zero's play style in the later Mega Man X games and features an in-depth ranking system that rewards the player with new abilities and enhancements (such as copied abilities from boss characters) in exchange for better play performance. In the fourth game, Zero can also physically steal weapons from enemies (such as axes and guns).
While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
Mega Man is the protagonist from the comic book series. He also appeared in Sonic the Hedgehog, Sonic Universe and Sonic Boom during the crossovers Worlds Collide and Worlds Unite. Aside from those appearances, Mega Man had a cameo appearance as a statue in the cover of Sonic the Hedgehog #89 (only his torso can be seen, behind the title) and a spray painting in the introduction page of Sonic Super Special #10. He was also vaguely referenced a few times in Sonic the Hedgehog #252.
Valiant Comics released a short series of comics featuring characters and settings from the Zelda cartoon as part of their Nintendo Comics System line. Manga adaptations of many entries in the series, including A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Four Swords Adventures, The Minish Cap, and Phantom Hourglass, have been produced under license from Nintendo, mostly in Japan. These cartoons are usually not involved with the chronology of the actual games.[clarification needed]

The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]
Several years passed, with Zelda remaining the same because of the curse. Link, who had become sixteen, learned of this tragedy and sets off on a journey to reclaim the lost section of the Triforce to lift the curse. Once Link gains the full Triforce, he goes back to the palace where Zelda resides in and disperses the curse. Now free from the curse, Zelda thanks Link and calls him a "real hero" for saving Hyrule. The curtains then fall as Link and Zelda appear to embrace each other.

Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Beyond the circuit races you can also race against others online. This is fun as well but there are some good racers out there. I have yet to finish top 3 in an online race. The Wii also awards you points, or takes them away, based on how well you finish in online races. Good way to gauge how good of a racer you are. I wasn't paying huge attention when I first started racing online, but I think you start with 5000 points. I am down to about 4000 points, so still working my way back.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[92][93][94] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[93][95] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[96]
Nintendo's 2011 timeline announcement subsequently posits that following Ocarina of Time, the timeline splits into three alternate routes: in one, Link fails to defeat Ganon, leading into the Imprisoning War and A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Link's Awakening, The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link. In the second and third, Link is successful, leading to a timeline split between his childhood (when Zelda sends him back in time so he can use the wisdom he has gained to warn the Zelda in the past of the horrifying fate of Hyrule) and adulthood (where the Zelda from the future lives on to try and rebuild the kingdom). His childhood continues with Majora's Mask, followed by Twilight Princess and Four Swords Adventures. The timeline from his adult life continues into Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks.
The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][93] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[97] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[98] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[99]
The Legend of Zelda, the first game of the series, was first released in Japan on February 21, 1986, on the Famicom Disk System.[56] A cartridge version, using battery-backed memory, was released in the United States on August 22, 1987, and Europe on November 27, 1987. The game features a "Second Quest," accessible either upon completing the game, or by registering one's name as "ZELDA" when starting a new quest. The Second Quest features different dungeons and item placement, and more difficult enemies.[57]
In 2011, to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the series, an art book was published exclusively in Japan under the name Hyrule Historia by Shogakukan. It contains concept art from the series's conception to the release of Skyward Sword in 2011 and multiple essays about the production of the games, as well as an overarching timeline of the series. It also includes a prequel manga to Skyward Sword by Zelda manga duo Akira Himekawa. The book received an international release by publisher Dark Horse Comics on January 29, 2013;[208] it took the number one spot on Amazon's sales chart, taking the spot away from E. L. James's 50 Shades of Grey trilogy.[209] Dark Horse released The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts, a follow-up art book to Hyrule Historia containing additional artwork and interviews,[210][211] in North America on February 21, 2017, and in Europe on February 23, 2017.[212]
^ "Zelda: The interview!". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. November 17, 2004. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved May 30, 2010. NoE: How does the Minish Cap fit into the Zelda chronology? Is it a prequel to the upcoming The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures on GameCube? Aonuma: Yes, this title takes place prior to The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, and tells the secret of the birth of the Four Sword.
Ah ha ha, now this is funny. Apparently Mega Man X Legacy Collection is going to revert the Mega Man X5 Maverick names back to the ones used in the original game’s manual rather than the Guns N’ Roses names. But actually, if the preview videos are any guide, they’re taking it one step further and they’re actually translating the stray Japanese words into English equivalents like I did on the Game Hints page. For example, Spiral Pegacion officially becomes Spiral Pegasus (which is what he should have been named all along—in my humble opinion). I don’t yet have a list of all eight names but I’m sure that will be forthcoming because we’re getting really close to release day.

After putting 20+ hours into this game over the weekend I have decided it is far and above my favorite Zelda game. My most wonderful experience so far has been seeing an island a ways off the map, getting on a raft and leaving the map to check out said island, and it has a challenge where you lose all your items and have a mission to complete on the island. I sadly didn't beat the challenge (having 4 hearts is why) but it was an experience off the map (literally) and one you had to look our for to find. The game rewards you for leaving the path that letting you run wild. I feel as if I have done so much, but at the same time keep realizing I have barely scratched the surface of this masterpiece. GOTY for sure. This game is worth both the 60 dollars for it, and the 300 dollars for the switch.
A number of official books, novels, and gamebooks have been released based on the series as well. The earliest was Moblin's Magic Spear, published in 1989 by Western Publishing under their Golden Books Family Entertainment division and written by Jack C. Harris. It took place sometime during the first game. Two gamebooks were published as part of the Nintendo Adventure Books series by Archway, both of which were written by Matt Wayne. The first was The Crystal Trap (which focuses more on Zelda) and the second was The Shadow Prince. Both were released in 1992. A novel based on Ocarina of Time was released in 1999, written by Jason R. Rich and published by Sybex Inc. under their Pathways to Adventure series. Another two gamebooks were released as part of the You Decide on the Adventure series published by Scholastic. The first book was based on Oracle of Seasons and was released in 2001. The second, based on Oracle of Ages, was released in 2002. Both were written by Craig Wessel. In 2006, Scholastic released a novel as part of their Nintendo Heroes series, Link and the Portal of Doom. It was written by Tracey West and was set shortly after the events of Ocarina of Time.
Mega Man X was a commercial success. The SNES version has sold 1.16 million copies worldwide to date, making it the 41st best-selling Capcom game of all time.[38][39] IGN's Jeremy Dunham speculated that the game's more mature storyline and its inclusion of numerous gameplay extensions over the original Mega Man series helped create a "unique cadre of fans".[40].[27] A spin-off series, Mega Man Zero, began in 2002 on the Game Boy Advance handheld as a result of the immense popularity of the character Zero.[41][42][27]
I was completely addicted to the original Super Mario Kart on SNES and Mario Kart 64, but I never really got into any of them after that... probably because MK Super Circuit was so crummy, it broke the spell. I always buy whatever new MK that comes out, but I just dabble with them for a few days and then virtually forget about them. I kinda got into MK7 for a while, but only after Sugar Rush (Wreck-It Ralph) put me in the mood. It had been sitting and collecting dust for a couple of years prior to that.
This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
Before his death, the King had imparted a secret to his daughter, Princess Zelda; with the Magician later finding out about it. The Magician then reported it to the Prince, who was looking for the Triforce of Courage, it being the only piece he did not possess. Thinking the secret to be the location for the Triforce Piece, the Prince ruthlessly asked about it to his sister.
Mega Man finds Bass again, injured in a fight. Mega Man takes him back to Dr. Light for repairs. However, when Mega Man returns to the lab, he finds the lab has been damaged by Bass, who has also stolen blueprints for the Super Adapter intended for Mega Man and Rush. Dr. Wily appears on the screen and reveals that Bass and Treble are his creations.
Mega Man is the protagonist from the comic book series. He also appeared in Sonic the Hedgehog, Sonic Universe and Sonic Boom during the crossovers Worlds Collide and Worlds Unite. Aside from those appearances, Mega Man had a cameo appearance as a statue in the cover of Sonic the Hedgehog #89 (only his torso can be seen, behind the title) and a spray painting in the introduction page of Sonic Super Special #10. He was also vaguely referenced a few times in Sonic the Hedgehog #252.
Another common theme is rebellion. The protagonists are often forced to fight a higher power either on a quest for revenge, for freedom or another motivation. The higher power can range from an empire, such as the Gestahlian Empire from Final Fantasy VI, a religion, such as Yevon from Final Fantasy X, or a deity, such as the fal'Cie from Final Fantasy XIII. During the journey to vanquish these powers their threat escalates, until the protagonists free the world of the oppressor(s).
LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.
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