Despite having an unusual set of moves, Mega Man shines in approaching while spacing opponents at midrange and disrupting any approaches, for he is blessed with two projectiles that can cause opponents to react predictably: Metal Blade's ability to be thrown in eight directions and trapping opponents in high hitstun makes it a fantastic mindgame and shield-baiting tool, while Crash Bomber can cause panicky opponents to run towards Mega Man or shield the explosion. Both projectiles easily lead to a grab punish as Mega Man owns a great grab combo ability, having a fast grab and many of his attacks connecting reliably after a throw. This allows him to rack up damage easily once he grabs an opponent. He does not have much trouble KOing once his opponents are damaged either, for he has many finishing options: from his lightning-fast up tilt to his projectile based forward smash which can be used to edgeguard. His other projectiles are terrific, notably his aerials; up aerial can KO early if an opponent is high up, and his down aerial is one of the safest meteor smashes in the game. To top it all off, Mega Man is a fantastic spacer: his jab is a fast and useful projectile (that can be used while moving and jumping) which interrupts most attacks and weak projectiles at a safe range, and when combined with Metal Blades and Crash Bombs makes Mega Man difficult to approach. Due to his amazing pressuring ability and grab game, characters without a projectile or with low reach can have trouble approaching without being severely punished. Even if he does get knocked around, Mega Man is a heavyweight character, weighing only slightly less than Captain Falcon, meaning he is more likely to survive potentially lethal blows that could KO a lighter character, especially with proper DI and his good recovery move, Rush Coil.
In Spirit Tracks, Princess Zelda can possess a Phantom's body after Link strikes it with a powered-up sword or the Lokomo Sword. While in this state, the princess can help Link solve various puzzles as well as cross certain obstacles that the young hero cannot traverse by himself.[40] Moreover, due to the Phantom's armor, she can also protect Link from attacks or use her strength to fight alongside Link and help him defeat enemies, as seen when fighting Geozards or Byrne.

The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Although originally the names "Battle Kid" (バトルキッド), "Mighty Kid" (マイティーキッド), "Knuckle Kid" (ナックルキッド), "Rainbow Warrior Miracle Kid" (レインボー戦士 ミラクルキッド) and "The Battle Rainbow Rockman" (ザ・バトルレインボー ロックマン),[4][5] were proposed, Capcom eventually settled on "Rockman" as Mega Man's Japanese moniker. The word "Rock" in Rockman is a reference to the music genre rock and roll, and is meant to work in tandem with his "sister" robot, Roll. Such music-themed naming conventions are present in a number of Keiji Inafune's other character designs, such as Blues. In addition, the original Mega Man titles intentionally incorporated a "Rock, Paper, Scissors" game play mechanic into defeating certain enemies. In parts of the English speaking world, some people call Mega Man "The Blue Bomber" because of his blue armor and high fighting capabilities.
In 1995, Square showed an interactive SGI technical demonstration of Final Fantasy VI for the then next generation of consoles. The demonstration used Silicon Graphics's prototype Nintendo 64 workstations to create 3D graphics.[114][115] Fans believed the demo was of a new Final Fantasy game for the Nintendo 64 console; however, 1997 saw the release of Final Fantasy VII for the Sony PlayStation.[115][116] The switch was due to a dispute with Nintendo over its use of faster but more expensive cartridges, as opposed to the slower and cheaper, but much higher capacity Compact Discs used on rival systems.[117][118] Final Fantasy VII introduced 3D graphics with fully pre-rendered backgrounds.[117][119] It was because of this switch to 3D that a CD-ROM format was chosen over a cartridge format.[117][120] The switch also led to increased production costs and a greater subdivision of the creative staff for Final Fantasy VII and subsequent 3D games in the series.[72]
Settings often contain elements based on real-world mythology, and the series features many allusions to religion. A notable example are ancient mythological creatures that function as summons, and have various different roles within the game lores. Espers from Final Fantasy VI are a magical race that once lived alongside humans until a war wiped most of them out. Aeons in Final Fantasy X are the physical realizations of the dreams of the fayth, and summoners use them to battle Sin. Many games featuring summoned monsters do not have them as a named race, or give them a key role within the lore, the summons being merely abilities to be used in battle.
In addition to eight iconic Mega Man X titles, both Mega Man X Legacy Collection and Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 come with an armory of new features. Test your Maverick-hunting skills in the new X Challenge mode, which pits players against two deadly bosses in a series of two-on-one battles. Think you can take down the slippery Chill Penguin and hulking Frost Walrus simultaneously? Give it your best shot! Additionally, Mega Man X Legacy Collection includes a huge museum filled with rare production art, catalogs of classic merchandise, a playlist of nostalgic commercials, and more. The collection also includes an animated a prequel film starring the origins of Mega Man X villain, Sigma.

Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.
The actions made by this incarnation of Princess Zelda were crucial to the development of the Zelda Timeline, since it was through Zelda's choices that three timelines were eventually created, making her instrumental in the history of Hyrule. Her plot with Link to retrieve the Triforce resulted in Ganondorf obtaining the Triforce of Power,[67] eventually leading to Ganondorf besting Link in the final battle, and thus forming the Fallen Hero Timeline.[76] Should Link succeed in defeating Ganondorf, sending Link back to his own time afterwards created two timelines: the Child Timeline and the Adult Timeline. The latter of the two shatters the Triforce of Courage and vanquishes the hero in the Adult Timeline,[77] resulting in Hyrule eventually being flooded.
The next three titles would be released on PlayStation 2. Due to the more advanced technology, the games no longer relied on pre-rendered backgrounds, instead using the game engine to render the backgrounds immediately. Final Fantasy X improved in the facial expressions displayed by the characters, using skeletal animation technology and motion capture, to allow the characters to make more realistic lip movements to match the new voice acting, a first in the series which previously was restricted to text-based story telling. The following release, Final Fantasy XI, was the first in the series to use online multiplayer features, which was another expensive development project for the company.[23] Final Fantasy XII would later use only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X in exchange for improved lighting and texture rendering.[24]
“The Blue Bomber is Back!”. I’ve been playing MM games since I was a child. I grew up in the 80’s and had most of the NES and SNES MM games. This one is easily in my top 3 favorites in the series! The game is a ton of fun, you can upgrade MM, buy items, and the graphics are gorgeous! I’m so hapoy they finally made a modern looking game. I love the older 8-bit visuals, but an growing a bit tired of them. This is a must buy!

In Breath of the Wild, most people seem to be aware of Princess Zelda's role in sealing the Great Calamity in Hyrule Castle one hundred years prior. However, it is unclear whether they know that she is still fighting to keep him sealed. One of the travelers Link encounters during his travels is a Hylian woman who is retracing Zelda's journey to the three springs. Moreover, Zelda was spoken of by people who knew her to their descendants, as Toffa reveals his grandfather told him about the Princess and her white horse during "The Royal White Stallion", and inherited from him the Royal Bridle and Royal Saddle which were once used by Princess Zelda one century ago. After completing the quest, Toffa states that his grandfather claimed there was nothing more beautiful than the sight of Princess Zelda riding her horse.


-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.

In essence, Mega Man is a very versatile, medium-ranged projectile fighter who has no trouble spacing opponents, though KO attempts can be risky for him as he suffers slightly at close range due to the lag of his attacks. He has to use his effective spacing and grab punish options to rack up damage at medium range while keeping his distance until the opponent is weak enough to risk using one of his slow yet powerful finishing moves.
Final Fantasy XV would be developed for the generation of consoles following, on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. It uses a new proprietary Luminous Engine, which was showcased during the demo Agni's Philosophy, and the engine early in development allowed the game to produce 5 million polygons per frame, with suggestions that the final game could be even more advanced.[28]
Zelda as Tetra displayed a tomboyish demeanor, taking challenges head on and even seeming bossy at times. At the beginning of the game, she does not think much of Link due to his habit of taking actions without thinking things through, and also due to the fact that he gets melancholic as they are setting sail to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue his sister.[117] Once Tetra discovers her true identity, she gains more respect towards the young hero, and apologizes for all that has happened to him and Aryll.[118] While Link and the King of Red Lions set out to look for the pieces of the Triforce of Courage, Zelda stays hidden away in a basement located inside Hyrule Castle in order to prevent getting caught by Ganondorf.[119] However, she is eventually found and is taken to Ganon's Tower, where Link must rescue her after assembling the Triforce of Courage.[120]
All in all, I really like this game, but its not perfect. For some odd reason the first level seems to be one of the hardest in the game and the lack of checkpoints on normal considering the length of the levels feels like an oversight (if you want less checkpoints, that should be what Hard difficulty is for). I'd say if Casual was actually the Normal setting, a lot of my issues would be invalid, however perhaps they're invalid anyway since you can choose how hard you want to make this game. If I'm just ignoring the difficulty settings though and focusing on what's there, this is definitely one of the best Mega Man games, possibly just below 2, 3, and 9. Yes some parts of the levels are cheap, but the game gives you so many options to lessen the frustration, I can't fault it too much.
The majority of the music in the series—including the main recurring themes, and the full official soundtracks for the first ten games in the main series—was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, and has been praised as one of the greatest aspects of the series.[15][16][17] The music has had a broad musical palette, taking influences from classical symphonic music, heavy metal and techno-electronica.

Multiple members of the game industry have expressed how Zelda games have impacted them. Rockstar Games founder and Grand Theft Auto director, Dan Houser, stated, "Anyone who makes 3-D games who says they've not borrowed something from Mario or Zelda [on the Nintendo 64] is lying."[194] Rockstar founder and Grand Theft Auto director Sam Houser also cited the influence of Zelda, describing Grand Theft Auto III as "Zelda meets Goodfellas".[195] Ōkami director Hideki Kamiya (Capcom, PlatinumGames) states that he has been influenced by The Legend of Zelda series in developing the game, citing The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past as his favorite game of all time.[196] Soul Reaver and Uncharted director, Amy Hennig (Crystal Dynamics, Naughty Dog), cited Zelda as inspiration for the Legacy of Kain series, noting A Link to the Past's influence on Blood Omen and Ocarina of Time's influence on Soul Reaver.[197] Soul Reaver and Uncharted creator, Richard Lemarchand (Crystal Dynamics, Naughty Dog), cited A Link to the Past's approach to combining gameplay with storytelling as inspiration for Soul Reaver.[198] Wing Commander and Star Citizen director, Chris Roberts (Origin Systems, Cloud Imperium Games), cited Zelda as an influence on his action role-playing game, Times of Lore.[199]
The second game, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, was released for the Famicom Disk System in Japan on January 14, 1987,[56] and for the Nintendo Entertainment System in Europe in November 1988 and North America in December 1988. The game exchanged the top-down perspective for side-scrolling (though the top-down point of view was retained for overworld areas), and introduced RPG elements (such as experience points) not used previously or thereafter in the series. The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II were released in gold-coloured cartridges instead of the console's regular grey cartridges. Both were re-released in the final years of the Nintendo Entertainment System with grey cartridges.
Zelda is kidnapped by Ganon, who imprisons her in his lair on Death Mountain. Before she was kidnapped, she shattered the Triforce of Wisdom into eight shards and scattered them throughout Hyrule to hide them from Ganon and prevent him from gaining its power. She then sent her nursemaid Impa in search of a hero that could reassemble the Triforce of Wisdom, be powerful enough to defeat Ganon, and rescue her. Zelda is not actually seen in this game until after Ganon is defeated.
In Twilight Princess, Zelda wields a rapier-like sword, though it is unknown if she authentically possesses any fencing skills as she is never shown actually attacking with it (Possessed Zelda does wield the sword, however since she was Ganondorf's puppet body, it was likely his fencing skills and not Zelda's). The Hyrule Warriors incarnation of Princess Zelda is shown to be a capable and graceful fencer who wields magical lightweight Rapiers that she can transform into a Bow of Light.
Phantom Slash's fully charged attack is now momentarily delayed, allowing Zelda to move around before the Phantom rushes forward. Zelda can set it as a trap and attack the opponent in tandem with the Phantom, or she can retreat behind it for protection. This also discourages the opponent from reflecting the Phantom since she now has enough time to respond with Nayru's Love.
Non-playable cameo appearances by Mega Man occur most often in other Capcom licensed games, and he is often seen as a background character. Such appearances include Mega Man Legends 2 (as a TV character), The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (TV character), Mega Man Star Force 2 (Brother), Adventure Quiz: Capcom World 2 (enemy), Street Fighter Alpha 3 (in a billboard), Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (in a banner and one of Norimano's attacks), Super Gem Fighter: Mini Mix (Felicia's attacks), Mighty Final Fight (in a billboard from the ending scene), and Power Stone 2.
Side special Crash Bomber 1-2% per hit, up to 8% Mega Man fires a Crash Bomb, which latches onto fighters and can be transferred between them. After a short time, the bomb explodes, hitting multiple times. Dissapears after travelling a moderate distance. Operates identically to the Gooey Bomb from Super Smash Bros. Brawl, but with a shorter time before exploding.
After Mega Man defeats Wily, the doctor becomes sick. Mega Man asks Wily if he has been infected with the Roboenza and Wily answers that he is a human, not a robot. Despite this opportunity to finally end Wily's evil schemes once and for all, Mega Man's heroic nature wins out and he takes Wily to a hospital. The mad scientist immediately broke out after recovering, but left behind enough of the cure to restore all of the robots infected with Roboenza. This would imply that Dr. Wily does in fact have some kindness in him.
The new release boasts a rich and varied repertoire of favorites and surprises, developed by the minds of Nobuo Uematsu, game developers SQUARE ENIX and the Distant Worlds production. Performed by the Distant Worlds Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus, recorded in November 2014 at the famed Dvorak Hall of the Rudolfinum in Prague (Czech Republic) and AWR Music Studio in Chicago (USA) and featuring the remarkable singing talents of Distant Worlds favorite, Susan Calloway, Distant Worlds III is recorded in high resolution at 88.2khz/24bit.
That's good to see....though it's very weird they're doing this in Asia only, and not the US where this game would have shown much better performance with retail shelf visibility during the Christmas rush, given the family friendly nature. I really have no idea what on Earth Squeenix was thinking with how they've handled the release of this game. I'm not sure Squeenix knows either...it's kind of their M.O. these days....
Among them are a slot car racer series based on Mario Kart DS, which comes with Mario and Donkey Kong figures, while Wario and Luigi are available separately. A line of radio-controlled karts have also been marketed, with are controlled by Game Boy Advance-shaped controllers, and feature Mario, Donkey Kong, and Yoshi. There are additional, larger karts that depict the same trio and are radio-controlled by a GameCube-shape controller.
At the Temple of Hylia, when Zelda states she must seal herself to keep Demise in place, she sheds tears of sadness and states before all this, she was happy just being with Link on Skyloft, demonstrating a deep level of feelings for her childhood friend. Link desperately tries to stop her and when she is sealed, Link lowers his head in sadness, showing his deep feelings for her. Once Link releases Zelda from her sealed state, he runs up and catches her from falling. They both hug and walk out smiling at each other, holding hands, before Ghirahim ruins the tender moment. During the ending, Zelda asks what Link will do now. Link sweetly smiles at her while their Loftwings fly off toward the sky, implying that he chose to stay on the Surface to live with Zelda.
Forward smash	Charge Shot	11.5%-19.5%	Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.

According to GamesRadar, the Mega Man games were the first to feature a non-linear "level select" option. This was a stark contrast to both linear games (like Super Mario Bros.) and open world games (like The Legend of Zelda and Metroid). GamesRadar credits the "level select" feature of Mega Man as the basis for the non-linear mission structure found in most open-world, multi-mission, sidequest-heavy games, including modern games like Grand Theft Auto, Red Dead Redemption and Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions.[18] In Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist tenth episode "Raging Demon", Ryu and Ken were seen playing Mega Man 2 from a gift from Ken's father.
While she was not the first Princess Zelda in the history of Hyrule, she was the first in a long line of princesses to be named Zelda by law and not tradition after she was put into a deep sleep for many generations. Her brother, the Prince of Hyrule at the end of its Golden Era, who was partly to blame for her comatose state, decided that, in honor of his sister, every princess born into the Royal Family of Hyrule should be named Zelda.[41][42]
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]
Three years after this, Dr. Wily, now working together with Dr. Light, went to investigate the ruins because the electromagnetic field started increasing, this being a good chance to clear his name. After a few days of search, Wily uncovered an ancient alien super computer inside the temple, Ra Moon, which revived his various Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and Mega Man 3 by analyzing the information about them in Dr. Wily's laptop. Wily thought it would be a great chance to conquer the world.
When it came to Mega Man 9, the one most people considered the hardest, I didn't really think it was that bad, the difficultly never felt punishing and it was usually fair in how many power-ups you were given and how the levels got steadily harder as you went along. Then came 10 which I thought was just WAY too hard and not in a good way. Where 9 felt balanced, 10 felt cheap and I found myself dying over and over for the stupidest reasons before finally just giving up on the game.
In essence, Mega Man is a very versatile, medium-ranged projectile fighter who has no trouble spacing opponents, though KO attempts can be risky for him as he suffers slightly at close range due to the lag of his attacks. He has to use his effective spacing and grab punish options to rack up damage at medium range while keeping his distance until the opponent is weak enough to risk using one of his slow yet powerful finishing moves.

Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
In addition to both the Hyrule Warriors incarnation of Zelda and Tetra, Ghost Zelda who is designated as Toon Zelda appears as a playable character from the Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks DLC. Toon Zelda fights by possessing a Phantom wielding Phantom Arms and light magic fueled by the Sacred Power of the Spirits. Unlike her grandmother Tetra, Toon Zelda has no role in the story. Additionally, there are several Fairy Clothing options based on her outfit can be unlocked on the Grand Travels Map: Destiny Tiara, Destiny Necklace, Destiny Top, and Destiny Skirt.

As the franchise has grown in popularity, several games have been released that are set within or star a minor character from the universe of The Legend of Zelda but are not directly connected to the main The Legend of Zelda series. Both map versions of the game BS Zelda no Densetsu for the Satellaview (released in August and December 1995) could be considered spin-offs due to the fact that they star the "Hero of Light" (portrayed by either the Satellaview's male or female avatar) as opposed to Link as the protagonist of Hyrule. A third Satellaview game released in March 1997, BS Zelda no Densetsu Inishie no Sekiban (BS The Legend of Zelda: Ancient Stone Tablets) could also be considered a spin-off for the same reason. Other spin-off games include Freshly-Picked Tingle's Rosy Rupeeland for the Nintendo DS – an RPG released in September 2006 in Japan (Summer of 2007 in the UK) to star supporting character Tingle. A second Tingle game is Tingle's Balloon Fight DS for the Nintendo DS. Here Tingle again stars in this spin-off arcade style platformer, released in April 2007 only in Japan and available solely to Platinum Club Nintendo members. In addition to games in which Link does not star as the protagonist, games such as the shooter game, Link's Crossbow Training (for the Wii), have been considered spin-offs due to the lack of a traditional "Save Hyrule" plot-line. Released in November 2007 as a bundle with the Wii Zapper, this game allows players to assume the identity of Link as he progresses through a series of tests to perfect his crossbow marksmanship. Color Changing Tingle's Love Balloon Trip was released in Japan in 2009 as a sequel to Freshly-Picked Tingle's Rosy Rupeeland. Hyrule Warriors, a crossover game combining the setting of Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda series and the gameplay of Tecmo Koei's Dynasty Warriors series, was announced for the Wii U video game system in December 2013 and was released in North America in September 2014. Hyrule Warriors Legends, a version for the Nintendo 3DS containing more content and gameplay modifications, was released in March 2016. To commemorate the launch of the My Nintendo loyalty program in March 2016, Nintendo released My Nintendo Picross: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, a Picross puzzle game developed by Jupiter for download to the Nintendo 3DS.[112][113]


The game introduces the double gear system. Using the shoulder buttons the player is able to activate either the power gear or the speed gear. The power gear makes your shots more powerful and the speed gear slows down enemies. You can only use each of these temporarily, because they'll over heat if you leave them active for too long. If this happens the double gear will will have to recharge before it can be used again. The game is perfectly designed so that you could make do without them, but it will push you to use these systems a lot. Some enemies are easier to dispatch with the speed gear, and most boss fights are made easier with the power gear. It seems gimmicky at first and upon first playing the game you'll often forget you have them, but once you settle in you'll find yourself using these systems more and more as you encounter hazards in levels that will encourage you to do so. There's another added benefit of the double gear system. When critically low on health you can press both shoulders at the same time to activate both the speed gear and power gear simultaneously. It's mostly a last ditch effort when low on health, and you can't actually turn this off, meaning your double gear will have to recharge without fail after its use, but it can help you out in a moment of desperation.
Enemies are weak to at least one weapon; for instance, Fire Man will take more damage from Ice Man's weapon than from other weapons. This concept draws inspiration from rock-paper-scissors. Robot Master levels can generally be completed in any order, resulting in a strategic hallmark of the series: determining the best order to defeat bosses and earn weapons. Sequels of Mega Man games contain new enemies alongside familiar ones, new bosses and weapons, and perhaps new gadgets. Later installments of the game give the player the option of commanding other player characters with different abilities, such as Proto Man, Duo, and Bass.

Once Link returns to his own world, Zelda is overcome with joy at seeing him again, shedding tears. Soon after, Fi asks Link to put Master Sword back in its pedestal, which would mean their parting. While understanding Link's feelings and feeling sad herself, Zelda encourages Link to do, to which he complies with. Their parting is not a sad one however, with said goodbye ending on a happy note.


Perfect game for all ages and anyone that comes over the house can pick it up really easily. My three year old got tired of the other games I had for the wii and I bought this one. He learned how to drive on his second try. He's still not coordinated enough to do everything well but he can complete a race, pick up items and use them. He's used a lot of the tracks and has a preference for some and even found a couple of short cuts on his own that I use now. Mom, dad, and son can play together and have fun since the races are short and it's easy enough to switch out games, cars, and characters. There are a good amount of characters to choose from. I do wish there were a couple more options on game types but this game is still really fun and it's my son's new favorite.

Mega Man gains various additional options from his custom moves. Shadow Blade and Ice Slasher are good for immobilizing opponents and are less susceptible to being used against Mega Man himself. Hyper Bomb and Danger Wrap are harder to land, but deal much more damage and knockback. Tornado Hold has more offensive value due to it dealing damage and granting Mega Man new combo potential. Plant Barrier does not last as long as the default Leaf Shield, but can deal and absorb more damage. Skull Barrier lacks a hitbox when circling Mega Man and deals less damage when thrown, but it reflects projectiles when orbiting and cannot be destroyed, giving it a more defensive value than both Leaf Shield and Plant Barrier lack.
Mega Man's playstyle is unique and unorthodox when compared to other fighters, having many projectiles in his moveset (his neutral attack, forward tilt, forward smash, neutral aerial, up aerial, Metal Blade, Crash Bomber and Leaf Shield are all projectiles). However, this only makes Mega Man's comboing ability better and more reliable, as his attacks can easily link into the other when used correctly, allowing Mega Man to easily rack up large amounts of damage on an opponent. His Metal Blade and Crash Bomber are considered to be two of the best projectiles in the game, as both have a wide variety of uses: Crash Bomber is a reliable mindgame tool that forces a punishable reaction out of the opponent: a defensive move (such as shielding or rolling), rushing Mega Man down in an attempt to give back the crash bomber, or simply taking the damage from its explosion. It also dishes out a good amount of shield damage and can combine well with the Metal Blade, forward smash, up aerial, and leaf shield for shield pressure. Metal Blades can string into a grab or dash attack, edgeguard, pressure shields, and even string into up tilt for a kill at higher percentages. Leaf Shield deprives the user of many of his options but in exchange he is granted four hitboxes around him and gives him the unique ability to attack while shielding or during invincibility frames, and it can also be used to gimp or interrupt recoveries of certain characters (such as Ness). When fired as a projectile, it also travels at a further range than any of his others and has high priority, it will outprioritize many other projectiles and continue moving. Complementing his heavy weight, Mega Man possesses an above average recovery in Rush Coil that makes him difficult to kill: it not only boosts him at a high distance, but has the unique quirk of allowing Mega Man to still use his double jump if he hasn't already and should Rush remain on-screen long enough, bouncing off of him can save the player if he gets meteor smashed

In the Hyrule Warriors series, Princess Zelda acts as the Supreme Leader of the Hyrulean Forces and the Hyrulean Soldiers bravely serve her in much the same way as in Twilight Princess and Ocarina of Time. Despite her role as a military commander, she retains the compassion for the soldiers that serve under her but chooses to fight alongside them rather than protected by them. In turn her soldiers are very loyal to her and she can raise their moral with words alone, though this can be a double-edged sword as they become quite demoralized when she goes missing and were it not for the leadership of Link and Impa, the entire Hyrulean Forces may have been defeated by the Dark Forces. Though she later returned to fight alongside them under her guise as Sheik, they did not recognize her (though to be fair neither did Impa) and continued to search for the missing Princess. However they were relived when her identity was revealed and did not hold her deception against her. They also did not abandon her or Hyrule when Ganondorf managed to steal the Triforce of Courage and Triforce of Wisdom and later joined her in invading Gerudo Desert in order to defeat Ganondorf's generals, Zant and Ghirahim. After managing to defeat the villains, Zelda would lead her army to reclaim Hyrule Castle and defeat Ganondorf's Forces. The surviving soldiers would also fight alongside Zelda and her allies in the final battle against Ganon.

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Mega Man made an appearance in the Cartoon Network show MAD in the skit Gaming's Next Top Princess, where he is one of the judges alongside Mario and another person. However, his appearance is slightly different outside of the animation style, he is shown with a buster set on the left hand at all times, and like 'Mega Man?' from Powered Up, the grey square on his helmet is a triangle, and he has brown eyes instead of blue.
Forget everything you know about The Legend of Zelda games. Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule In this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on Nintendo Switch, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.


In the Hyrule Warriors Legends, Linkle and her fellow Villagers are the only civilians of Hyrule to appear. After Villagers receive word that Hyrule Castle has been attacked and that Princess Zelda is leading the fight against the invaders, Linkle under the impression that she is the legendary hero, leaves her village to aid Princess Zelda and the struggling Hyrulean Forces. Though she got lost on her way to the castle, Linkle would later join Twili Midna in rescuing Princess Zelda after she went to the Palace of Twilight to stop the flow of Dark Twilight Magic that threated to consume the entire land of Hyrule. Though she managed to rescue Princess Zelda, after seeing Twili Midna's decision to sacrifice her true form to stop the dark magic, Linkle decided to continue on her original journey to Hyrule Castle, rather than joining up with Zelda and Midna. Ultimately this turned out to be the right decision as Linkle after at the ruins of Hyrule Castle shortly after Ganon's defeat, discovering the remnants of his army attacking the battle weary Hyrulean Forces and Impa who stayed behind to defend castle while Zelda and Link returned the Master Sword to its pedestal. Joining in the fight, Linkle and Impa manage to lead the Hyrulean Forces to victory and defened the kingdom in Zelda and Link's absence.


One key theme in the series is dualism, presented in many ways, such as through a contrast between two worlds, between two heroes/heroines, and between a protagonist and an antagonist. Most often this dualism represents a balance that is disturbed by outside forces, forcing the protagonists to restore it. Other times, the "balance" set is deemed unjust by the protagonists and they must instead end the cycle to free the world.
Like the new weapons that Mega Man can steal from them, the new Robot Masters in Mega Man 11 are inventive and inspired. There are some familiar archetypes, like the explosive Blast Man, icy Tundra Man, electrified Fuse Man and fiery Torch Man, but most have characteristics that help differentiate them from similar bosses in previous games. Torch Man, for example, is a camping safety robot, and his outdoorsy, barbecue-inspired level helps him stand out from past fire-based Robot Masters. Other standouts include Bounce Man, whose stage is full of trampolines and bouncy balls, where Mega Man is forced to platform his way through the stage boinging to and fro; and Blast Man, whose stage is wired with explosives, many of which have to be triggered by launching the level’s combustible enemies into them in order to progress.
WatchMojo.com has frequently placed titles in the series in top ten lists, including top 10 JRPGs of all time*,[76] top 10 PSOne games*,[77] top ten PSOne RPGs*,[78] top ten PlayStation games of all time*,[79] and top ten Super Nintendo RPGs*.[80] The series held seven Guinness World Records in its Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, including "Most Games in an RPG Series", "Longest Development Period"* and "Fastest Selling Console RPG in a Single Day";[81] in the subsequent issue in 2009, two titles in the series featured in its top 50 console games*.[82]

The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases. 

Although Zelda's design is now based off of her appearance in Twilight Princess, she retains her Sheik transformation. As Sheik, game director Masahiro Sakurai states that her updated character design is based on a potential design made in the early drafting stages of Twilight Princess. This version of Sheik now carries a small blade at the waist and sports longer hair in the back, tied in a similar style to her Princess Zelda form. Interestingly enough, Sheik's hair remains blonde, while Princess Zelda's updates to light brown per her Twilight Princess appearance. As Nintendo established via Sheik's trophy in Super Smash Bros. Melee that the Sheik disguise was a magical costume change, the magic could presumably explain the hair color as well.
The first game in the Mario Kart series is Super Mario Kart which was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1992. The development of the first game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, the Japanese video game designer who created the original Super Mario Bros., as well as many other successful games for Nintendo. Darran Jones of NowGamer suggests that the original success of Super Mario Kart was the result of including characters previously seen in Mario Bros. games, while also being a new type of racing game.[2]
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