Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[158][159][160][161][162][163] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[164] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[142][165] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[166]

In The Wind Waker, Tetra (as Princess Zelda) briefly wields the Master Sword that had been dropped by Link, making her one of the few people besides Link to be shown wielding the Blade of Evil's Bane. Her ability to wield it proves that Tetra (despite being a pirate) possesses a heart untainted by evil, as it has often been stated that evil beings are incapable of touching and or wielding it. However as she wields it only briefly before returning it to Link, it is unknown if Tetra could wield it as effectively as the various incarnations of the Hero. Being a pirate, Tetra is implied to possess some sword fighting skills and carries a short dagger-like blade, which she is shown wielding in promotional artwork. In the spin-off Hyrule Warriors series, she wields cutlasses (along with magically infused pistols) and is even capable of performing the Spin Attack.


Every game in the main Zelda series has consisted of three principal areas: an overworld in which movement is multidirectional, allowing the player some degree of freedom of action; areas of interaction with other characters (merely caves or hidden rooms in the first game, but expanding to entire towns and cities in subsequent games) in which the player gains special items or advice; and dungeons, areas of labyrinthine layout, usually underground, comprising a wide range of difficult enemies, bosses, and items. Each dungeon usually has one major item inside, which is usually essential for solving many of the puzzles within that dungeon and often plays a crucial role in defeating that dungeon's boss, as well as progressing through the game. In nearly every Zelda game, navigating a dungeon is aided by locating a map, which reveals its layout, and a magic compass, which reveals the location of significant and smaller items such as keys and equipment. In later games, the series includes a special "big key" that will unlock the door to battle the dungeon's boss enemy and open the item chest.
Now we come to 11 where the series has had its first major overhaul with the addition of the gear mechanics. This takes some adjusting too as you'll quickly find you NEED to use the speed gear to get past many obstacles. However, this leads to one problem I have with the game which is that at times, it feels more akin to a puzzle platformer than a standard Mega Man game.
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.
Zelda's alter egos appear to have specialized abilities of their own. In Skyward Sword, it is implied that Zelda and her subsequent incarnations' abilities may be due to her connection to the Goddess Hylia and are potentially divine in nature. In Breath of the Wild, both Kass and Impa refer to the Princess of Hyrule as possessing the blood of the Goddess in their retelling of the legend of Calamity Ganon's defeat ten thousands years ago. Unlike other incarnations, the Breath of the Wild incarnation of Zelda initially has trouble awakening her powers, and as a result develops an interest in science and ancient technology. In Link's memories she is shown using the Sheikah Slate which Link uses 100 years later. She is familiar with Gerudo Town law and uses it to her advantage to allude Link's protection detail as Link a man could not accompany Zelda into Gerudo Town a fact Zelda used to her advantage. However her privileged upbringing means she apparently lacks Link's level of physical fitness and was easily cornered by three Yiga Clan Footsoldiers despite running as fast as she could. Zelda is well read and capable researcher though as shown in one of Link's memories when she fails to realize a Hot-Footed Frog has to be cooked into a Hasty Elixir enhance the consumer's physical abilities due to her excitement over catching one and enthusiasm to study its effects using Link as a test subject due to his high level of physical fitness causing her to try and humorously force Link to consume the uncooked frog despite his visible disgust. However her expertise in studying ancient technology is enough that she can calibrate Divine Beasts and understand their functions and inner workings with Divine Beasts being her primary focus along with the Sheikah Slate. She also realized the significance of the Shrine of Resurrection and ensured it was restored to working order upon discovering it was a medical facility recognizing Ganon must be formidable to necessitate such a facility. Zelda also possess precognition like her previous incarnations as she felt something horrible would happen before the Great Calamity and recognized the increased monster activity was a sign of Ganon's return. She also has some medical knowledge such as the medical applications of various flower species in Hyrule and first aid as she treated Link's minor injuries he received fight monsters in Eldin Canyon. She also apparently has an interest in growing endangered flower species such as Silent Princess which despite her and other people's efforts have failed to grow domestically. Zelda is also shown to be a capable horseback rider who has her own Royal White Stallion. Her concept artwork even depicts her wielding a riding crop. However she requires advice from Link to improve her relationship with her horse as while she is a capable rider she apparently failed to consider its feelings until Link advised her how to soothe her horse and inspired Zelda to empathize with her horse improving their relationship. After awakening her powers, Zelda is shown to be strong enough to seal both herself and Calamity Ganon in Hyrule Castle for 100 years. She also recognized Link would likely lose his memories from the untested Slumber of Restoration thus took steps to help him recover his memories through pictures she left on the Sheikah Slate and a final picture kept by Impa. Interestingly, in both Skyward Sword and Breath of the Wild, Zelda does not age while sealed by her own powers. Yet, in the latter, she appears fully conscious of the outside world while in stasis, likely having the same perception of time as Link. Due to her aging being halted she remains physically seventeen despite being approximately 117 years old as she turned seventeen around the time the Great Calamity began and she kept Ganon sealed for approximately a hundred years making her the oldest known living incarnation of Zelda due to not aging at all for a century.
Mega Man then confronts Wily and defeats him again. As always, Wily begs for forgiveness, but Mega Man points his Mega Buster at him, saying he does not trust Wily and plans on killing him. Dr. Wily, scared out of his wits, reminds Mega Man that robots cannot harm humans. In the original Japanese version, Mega Man is speechless. In the English version, he replies that he is "more than just a robot", implying he was planning on firing his Buster anyway, which was a stark contrast to how Mega Man is normally.
As it turns out, though, Square Enix has now reportedly revealed a later-than-expected physical release on Switch. The news comes from the folks at NintendoSoup, who mention that "there will be no physical release in North America, Europe, and Japan", with the physical copy instead being released exclusively in Southeast Asia. The situation gets more and more strange every time we hear about it.
Princess Zelda returns as a playable character in the fifth installment of Super Smash Bros. Her appearance is now based on her design from A Link Between Worlds, since Masahiro Sakurai and the developers felt her Breath of the Wild incarnation was more suited to research than combat. In the Japanese trailer, however, it lists the basis of her appearance as being Triforce of the Gods, or A Link to the Past. Her move set is largely the same as previous games with some adjustments. However, Zelda's Final Smash has changed from the Light Arrow to the Triforce of Wisdom, which will trap opponents inside the titular Triforce piece for huge damage.
I feel like there is less cheap death compared to previous installments, but it makes itself more of an endurance match to get to the boss. I really enjoy each stage having its own thought out mini boss also and the fact that you don't spawn right in front of the door when you die. You instead have to work your way back without losing too much health so you can make it through the fight while still making a couple errors.
Don’t be too afraid, however: While tough stretches in previous Mega Man games forced you to learn patterns and hone your skills, in Mega Man 11 you can stock up on powerups to take the edge off. For every challenge, there’s a consumable item to snatch you out of a pit, refill your energy, or protect you from spikes. You just have to grind a bit to collect bolts and purchase your way to success. Of course, grinding is not fun, so it’s only when I got really annoyed with replaying a lengthy level that I went shopping.

Princess Zelda is one of the three most important characters of The Legend of Zelda series, which is also why her name appears in the title of every game. Princess Zelda first appeared in the original The Legend of Zelda, and has since been featured in every subsequent game, with the exception of Link's Awakening. Each incarnation of the Princess is chosen by destiny to be the keeper of the Triforce of Wisdom in their respective eras, which is the main reason why they play such an integral role in the legends of Hyrule.


Mega Man next appeared in anime produced in Japan and based on spin-off series. First was MegaMan NT Warrior (2002-06), based on the Mega Man Battle Network video game series (both the anime and the video game series were known as Rockman.EXE in Japan). This was followed by Mega Man Star Force (2006-08), based on the video game series of the same name (both were known as Shooting Star Rockman in Japan).[citation needed]

The Legend of Zelda series has crossed-over into a number of other Nintendo and third party video games. Most prominent of the collaborations would be in the Super Smash Bros. series of fighting games published by Nintendo. Link appears as a fighter in Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the first entry in the series, and is part of the roster in all subsequent releases in the series as well. Zelda, (who is able to transform into Sheik as well), Ganondorf, and Young Link (the child version of Link from Ocarina of Time) were added to the player roster for Super Smash Bros. Melee, and appeared in all subsequent releases except for "Young Link", who is later replaced by "Toon Link" from The Wind Waker, in subsequent releases Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U however, both Young Link and Toon Link appear in the fifth installment, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Other elements from the series, such as locations and items, are also included throughout the Smash Bros. series. Outside of the series, Nintendo allowed for the use of Link as a playable character exclusively in the GameCube release of Namco's fighting game Soulcalibur II.[114]

Like its previous installments of games, Mario Kart Wii incorporates playable characters from the Mario series, who participate in kart races on various race tracks using specialized items to hinder opponents or gain advantages. The game features multiple single-player and multiplayer game modes including a four person split screen. Online multiplayer via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was available at launch, but was discontinued in May 2014, along with other Wii and Nintendo DS games that supported online play.[2] Many fans have created alternative servers to continue playing on, one of the more notable being Wiimmfi.
When Nintendo revealed the GameCube on August 24, 2000, the day before Nintendo's SpaceWorld 2000 exposition,[79] a software demonstration showed a realistically styled real-time duel between Ganondorf and Link. Fans and the media speculated that the battle might be from a Zelda game in development.[80] At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda game, later released as The Wind Waker in December 2002. Due to poor reception, nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages".[81][82] The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.

Mega Man set out to stop Wily and his robots again, who had stolen the new parts developed by Dr. Light and kidnapped Roll. If the player decides to pursue Wily, Mega Man will mention that Wily's scheming has ended, and then moves in close, presumably to apprehend him. However, he then reacts in shock when he discovers that "Wily" was in fact a mechanical duplicate. If the player decides to rescue Roll, Roll will apologize for worrying Mega Man before revealing she managed to steal some energy from the Wily Robot. In Mega Man's ending, Mega Man says he will bring peace for both humans and robots, and Dr. Wily informs Mega Man that he is no different than him, as he destroyed Wily's robots. Mega Man is in disbelief with what Wily said, but Dr. Light, Roll, and Auto appear to cheer him. Proto Man also appears if he was his partner. Mega Man starts feeling better, but Wily uses their distraction to escape again, and Mega Man starts to pursue him. His cooperative mode ending with Bass has him forced into a battle with Bass shortly after stopping Wily, despite both being significantly injured due to Bass wanting to fulfill his directive, although the conclusion is never revealed. In his cooperative mode ending with Duo, he wishes Duo luck as he proceeds to leave the planet with the energy.
Princess Zelda appears in this game solely as Tetra, her alter ego in The Wind Waker. She does not regain her royal persona, although quite often when she appears, “Zelda's Lullaby” plays in the background, and she is called "Zelda" by some of the pirates during the game's intro,[123] much to Tetra's chagrin.[124] Her role is somewhat limited in the game as she is kidnapped early on in the story, and when Link finds her at last she has been turned to stone.[125]

In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[92][93][94] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[93][95] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[96]
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]

The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
At the story's start, she takes Link, whom she has been childhood friends with since they were infants, to the Picori Festival in Hyrule Town. During the ceremony following the Picori Festival Tournament, she is turned into stone by the winner, Vaati. Vaati is an evil mage searching for a legendary Light Force, and knowing Zelda has mystical powers of her own, he wants to keep her out of the way. Later, discovering that her power is, in fact, the Light Force, Vaati invades Hyrule Castle and abducts the petrified Princess, planning to sacrifice her and become a god. Link, after reforging the Four Sword, attacks the castle and faces off against Vaati. Upon defeating the evil mage, Link uses the power of the Four Sword to restore Zelda, who tells Link she had seen him on his adventure as if through a dream, to normal. Zelda then uses the power of the Magic Cap and Light Force to return Hyrule to its natural state. The overflowing power of life causes the Minish Cap to break apart. Ezlo then states that Zelda's kindness as well as the power of the Minish Cap (or Light Force, in the Japanese version of the game) created a miracle. With the time to part nearing, Zelda and Link see Ezlo off as he returns to the Minish World.
The Minish Cap is a special Nintendo game. The only new Zelda game on the Game Boy Advance console, the game felt like having a grand SNES adventure in the palm of your hands. The Minish Cap was a rare example of a Nintendo sharing its series with other developers, as the game was developed by Capcom and Flagship. This remix of the Hyrule Town and Picori Festival themes was posted on OverClocked Remix by Lemonectric. The remix, called “A Bag Full…
Ah ha ha, now this is funny. Apparently Mega Man X Legacy Collection is going to revert the Mega Man X5 Maverick names back to the ones used in the original game’s manual rather than the Guns N’ Roses names. But actually, if the preview videos are any guide, they’re taking it one step further and they’re actually translating the stray Japanese words into English equivalents like I did on the Game Hints page. For example, Spiral Pegacion officially becomes Spiral Pegasus (which is what he should have been named all along—in my humble opinion). I don’t yet have a list of all eight names but I’m sure that will be forthcoming because we’re getting really close to release day.
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