Der nächste Meilenstein erschien im Jahre 1998 für den Nintendo 64: „Ocarina of Time“ bot erstmals 3D-Grafik. Des Weiteren ist von diesem Zeitpunkt an die namensgebende Okarina ein weiteres Markenzeichen der Serie. Mit „The Wind Waker“ erschien 2003 der erste Ableger für den Gamecube, in dem man nicht in Hyrule, sondern auf einer Inselwelt unterwegs ist. Darauf folgte 2006 ein weiteres Zelda im alternativen Gewand: In „Twilight Princess“ für Gamecube und Wii lernt der Spieler eine neue Prinzessin Zelda kennen und kann Link auf Knopfdruck in einen Wolf verwandeln.
The art style, though, is certainly a treat. It's a little different, but it works. The game is fairly bright and colorful, but this is to be expected from the classic Mega Man series. The games were known for being more lighthearted than the X or Zero series, so the art style feels appropriate. Most the stage backgrounds are also rather nice, as are some of the enemy designs. There are a lot of familiar classic enemies as well as new ones.
Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.

Fi's spirit may continue to exist within the Master Sword in Breath of the Wild. Princess Zelda reveals to the Great Deku Tree that the Master Sword told her that her destiny was not finished, it convinced her to seal Calamity Ganon herself. In his vision after removing the sword, Link sees Zelda speaking to the Master Sword as if it was a person. She told the Master Sword that its master (Link) would come for it, like Fi whose spirit slumbers within the sword and refers to Link as "master" in Skyward Sword.


Though it’s also on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, I felt compelled to first play Mega Man 11 on a Nintendo system, where the majority of the Mega Man games have lived. Here’s what you need to know about playing Mega Man 11 on Nintendo Switch: Unfortunately, there’s a small, but significant flaw in that the Y and B buttons on the right Joy-Con are too near the right thumbstick, and the classic Mega Man players’ pattern of shooting and jumping simultaneously can result in some accidental hits of the right thumbstick, which by default changes your weapons (you can turn this stick function off). Additionally, not having a D-pad on the left Joy-Con stinks. I also experienced some incorrect button signals getting to the television when playing in docked mode. Thankfully, all of this can be circumvented by using the Pro Controller (if you have one).
Down smash Flame Blast 17% (clean), 14% (mid), 9% (late) Mega Man plants both arm cannons into the ground, causing two vertical flaming pillars to erupt from the ground either side of him which launch the opponent upwards. It has quick startup, but notoriously long endlag that leaves it highly punishable if not landed. Immense knockback when hit with the first frames of the hitbox, which can KO starting at 60% when fully charged. It boasts incredible power, being the fourth-strongest down smash in SSB4, behind Lucario at maximum aura, Ganondorf, and Bowser Jr.. It is based on Flame Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.

Mega Man currently ranks 27th on the SSB4 tier list, in C tier as a high tier character. Mega Man's most prevalent advantage is that he has among the best projectile games in Smash 4, with his wide array of projectiles being able to keep opponents away. He excels in pressuring as a result, with his Crash Bomber able to pressure shields easily, Metal Blade being an overall useful tool for forcing approaches, shield pressure and edgeguarding, and a useful mid-range spacing tool with his Mega Buster. This is made more effective once combined with Mega Man's grab game; his grab is among the fastest in the game, with his down throw being a decent combo starter, while his back throw is a decent damage racker and KO option at high percents. Mega Man also possesses above-average endurance due to his high weight and falling speed, which ties in with an effective recovery in Rush Coil that doesn't cause him to go helpless. Some of Mega Man's finishes are also among the strongest in the game, such as his up tilt and down smash. Finally, owing to his high air friction, Mega Man also has extremely fluid control in the air, including the ability to zig-zag while jumping.


Titles in the series have generally received praise for their storylines, characters, settings, music, battle elements and graphics.[43][44][25] Many other aspects in particular have received praise, such as the job system, a series staple,[45][46] with GameSpot stating it is "hard to say enough good things" about it, referring to the the "exciting variety" it offers to the gameplay.[47] Another popular feature is the self-referential nature of many of the games and inclusions of allusions to previous games, with recurring features such as chocobos, moogles and Gilgamesh among others, being well received as nods to make fans feel at home.[48][49][50] The series has also been praised for its gameplay variety and innovation between installments to prevent the gameplay from going stale.[51][52][53]
Several games within the series have become best-selling games. At the end of 2007, the seventh, eighth, and ninth best-selling RPGs were Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, and Final Fantasy X respectively.[142] Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 11 million copies worldwide,[143] earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy game.[144] Within two days of Final Fantasy VIII's North American release on September 9, 1999, it became the top-selling video game in the United States, a position it held for more than three weeks.[145] Final Fantasy X sold over 1.4 million Japanese units in pre-orders alone, which set a record for the fastest-selling console RPG.[142][146] The MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, reached over 200,000 active daily players in March 2006[147] and had reached over half a million subscribers by July 2007.[46] Final Fantasy XII sold more than 1.7 million copies in its first week in Japan.[148] By November 6, 2006—one week after its release—Final Fantasy XII had shipped approximately 1.5 million copies in North America.[149] Final Fantasy XIII became the fastest-selling game in the franchise,[150] and sold one million units on its first day of sale in Japan.[151] Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, in comparison to its predecessor, was a runaway success, originally suffering from servers being overcrowded,[152] and eventually gaining over one million unique subscribers within two months of its launch.[153]
That's good to see....though it's very weird they're doing this in Asia only, and not the US where this game would have shown much better performance with retail shelf visibility during the Christmas rush, given the family friendly nature. I really have no idea what on Earth Squeenix was thinking with how they've handled the release of this game. I'm not sure Squeenix knows either...it's kind of their M.O. these days....
-There's no minimap on the screen during races or battle mode. You apparently have to use the gamepad screen for the minimap, which is pointless if you're not playing using the gamepad or unfair in local multiplayer if only one person gets to use the gamepad. Also by removing your eyes from the road to look down at the gamepack can often result in disaster. So, what the heck, I want an onscreen minimap as is tradition.
According to GamesRadar, the Mega Man games were the first to feature a non-linear "level select" option. This was a stark contrast to both linear games (like Super Mario Bros.) and open world games (like The Legend of Zelda and Metroid). GamesRadar credits the "level select" feature of Mega Man as the basis for the non-linear mission structure found in most open-world, multi-mission, sidequest-heavy games, including modern games like Grand Theft Auto, Red Dead Redemption and Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions.[18] In Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist tenth episode "Raging Demon", Ryu and Ken were seen playing Mega Man 2 from a gift from Ken's father.
Jump up ↑ "There are three kinds of Triforce -- Power, Wisdom, and Courage. [...] Of the three, I have left Power and Wisdom in the kingdom. But the Triforce Courage I have hidden for a reason. [...] The Triforce of Courage is hidden in the Great Palace in the Valley of Death on the largest island in Hyrule." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 9, 10)
As it turns out, though, Square Enix has now reportedly revealed a later-than-expected physical release on Switch. The news comes from the folks at NintendoSoup, who mention that "there will be no physical release in North America, Europe, and Japan", with the physical copy instead being released exclusively in Southeast Asia. The situation gets more and more strange every time we hear about it.

The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][101] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[102] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][101] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[103][104][105] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][103] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[106] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][103] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[107] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[108][109][110]
Don’t be too afraid, however: While tough stretches in previous Mega Man games forced you to learn patterns and hone your skills, in Mega Man 11 you can stock up on powerups to take the edge off. For every challenge, there’s a consumable item to snatch you out of a pit, refill your energy, or protect you from spikes. You just have to grind a bit to collect bolts and purchase your way to success. Of course, grinding is not fun, so it’s only when I got really annoyed with replaying a lengthy level that I went shopping.
Mario Kart Wii was well-received, earning praise for its online capability and the large number of tracks, characters and karts. Joe Sinicki of Blast Magazine comments: "While it still does suffer from some of the problems of the older games, Mario Kart Wii takes the simple and accessible formula set by its predecessors and tweaks it enough to make it feel fresh and fun, creating one of the most entertaining and rewarding gaming experiences in quite some time."[30] Official Nintendo Magazine commented that the Wii Wheel worked very effectively and loved the different multiplayer modes.[31] GameSpot producer Lark Anderson praised the game for being easy to jump into for players of any skill level and stated that motorcycles provide a great alternative to go-karts,[23] and IGN commented "Nintendo has delivered one of the best console Karts in years."[25] Plugged In stated that the racing is easy to do and that "the Grand Prix Cup events and several team battle modes keep things interesting" while Classic Game Room praised the game for its high production value and great replay value. They also liked that the online play was a major strength of the game.
Even after his crushing defeat at the hands of Mega Man, Dr. Wily was already planning his next scheme. If he could get his hands on the time machine (named Time Skimmer in the American manual) that was being developed at the Time-Space Research Laboratory (named Chronos Institute in the American manual), he thought he just might be able to change the past.
Initially quite hostile and condescending towards Zelda, their relationship was not stable at first. This was to the point where she referred to Zelda as "Twilight Princess", presumably as a way to mock her and the state Hyrule was in. This changed though, when Zelda seemingly sacrificed herself to save Midna's life. This caused Midna to became more respectful and caring towards others.
Shigeru Miyamoto has stated that Zelda's name was inspired by Zelda Fitzgerald. The name Zelda is generally believed to be Germanic in origin, meaning "gray fighting maid" or "woman warrior" and derived from the Old German Griselda ("dark battle").[7] Another possible origin is the Old English word selde ("companion").[8] Additionally, it is a Yiddish name meaning "happiness" or "luck".
Mario Kart Wii was the sixth game in the Mario Kart series, following Super Mario Kart, Mario Kart 64, Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Mario Kart: Double Dash, and Mario Kart DS.[11] Hideki Konno, who worked with the Software Development Department of Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) division and had previously worked on the first 2 Mario Kart games as well as Mario Kart DS, served as the game’s producer. Shigeru Miyamoto acted as “General Producer” and gave miscellaneous advice on various aspects of the game.[12]
LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.
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