Nintendo's 2011 timeline announcement subsequently posits that following Ocarina of Time, the timeline splits into three alternate routes: in one, Link fails to defeat Ganon, leading into the Imprisoning War and A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Link's Awakening, The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link. In the second and third, Link is successful, leading to a timeline split between his childhood (when Zelda sends him back in time so he can use the wisdom he has gained to warn the Zelda in the past of the horrifying fate of Hyrule) and adulthood (where the Zelda from the future lives on to try and rebuild the kingdom). His childhood continues with Majora's Mask, followed by Twilight Princess and Four Swords Adventures. The timeline from his adult life continues into Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks.
As the last free descendant, Zelda uses telepathy to contact the descendant of the Knights of Hyrule, Link, to save her.[32] Despite his efforts in evacuating her from Hyrule Castle, Agahnim manages to capture Zelda and sacrifice her to the Dark World, breaking the seal between Hyrule and the Dark World.[80][81] While in the Dark World, Princess Zelda is held inside a crystal prison within Turtle Rock.[82] When Link frees her, she, along with the other maidens, breaks the seal surrounding Ganon's lair.[83]
I've been a Legend of Zelda fan forever. From the Game Cube's Ocarina of Time to the Wii's Skyward Sword, I've played them all, and each time I have the same reaction: how do these games keep getting better!? Eventually, you would think that the Zelda world, puzzles, and story would get repetitive and old, but with each iteration, Nintendo manages to change just enough to recapture your interest and awe in familiar characters and places. The game offers all that we love and expect from of a Zelda game while adding an entire new layer of complexity and customization. The map is entirely open-world, which differs from traditional, linear Zelda games, and everything is destructible and collectible. To match this, the inventory system feels much more similar to a standard open-world game as well. This gives the familiar settings of Hyrule, Faron, and Gerudo--to name a few--an entirely different flavor! Breath of the Wild also makes perfect use of the Switch engine--it has superb, Nintendo-style graphics that are just realistic enough to completely immerse yourself while not being overly realistic as to detract from the cartoon-ish nature of the series. This style, combined with the seamless animations and dynamic movement of the Switch create a truly beautiful and stunning world to explore. This game is basically a friendlier, happier, and more puzzle-centric Skyrim. Speaking of the dynamic movements, this game captures all of the best aspects of the old Wii games while doing away with the clunky, unrefined aspects. Different weapons require different swing patters while looking around is as simple as pointing and clicking, but without the click! If this style of gaming isn't for you, the game is just as easy and intuitive on the traditional Switch controller. Overall, this is an amazing game that has something for everyone--phenomenal graphics and game play, memorizing story lines and characters, thought-provoking puzzles, and action and adventure for the whole family to enjoy. Even though I am writing this review as part of a contest, I would HIGHLY recommend this game to anyone and everyone, young and old, Zelda newbies and veterans--it will not disappoint!
Producer Hideki Konno wanted to include certain online features for Mario Kart DS, but they were left out due to time constraints. These features would, however, be implemented in Mario Kart Wii. The developers wanted to avoid races becoming more deserted as they progressed, thus altering the online matchmaking to allow players to join a race once it is finished for participation in the next one.[13] The game was the first in the series to feature BMX motorbikes as drivable vehicles, an idea which Konno had proposed since Double Dash out of his own passion for extreme sports but was rejected due to the seemingly bizarre image of Mario riding a bike.[14] The concept of extreme sports elements was considered in Mario Kart DS, but due to the difficulty in including the concept in a handheld game, it wasn’t able to be implemented until Wii. Because of the feature’s inclusion, the game was briefly known internally under the name "Mario Kart X" before its final name was decided upon, referring to the "X" in the word "extreme".[citation needed] The designers tested roughly 30 different prototypes with different shapes, colors and weights based on real-life go-karts. The final design for the wheel was made to be as lightweight as possible in order for it to suit long-term periods of gameplay, and it was made entirely white despite experimentation with two-colored designs in order for it to fit with the color scheme of previous peripherals such as the Wii Zapper and the Wii Balance Board. A blue ring with the Wii logo inside of it was also placed on the backside of the wheel to give spectating players something interesting to look at; as a result, this blue ring ended up being featured in the game’s logo.[15]
The Mega Man Zero games have earned generally positive reviews. Review sources both criticized and praised the high difficulty level of the game and remarked that they were similar in nature to earlier installments in the Mega Man series. Positive reviews noted the variety of abilities and customization along with an engaging story than compared to its prequel series, while negative reviews focused on the series repetitiveness and lack of originality. Review scores were lower for the last two games in the series, with critics pointing out that the games were just using the same gameplay without introducing anything new.[43] When the first game in the series came out, reviewers were quick to hail a return to what they considered "the Mega Man roots", however some fans criticized that the lack of knowing which boss the player will face next was a change for the worse and that it "takes away what made the series unique in the past".[44]

The Dreamwave series lasted only four issues and also ended abruptly, with plot-threads from the first three issues being dropped completely in the final issue and the inclusion of a short story promising a Mega Man X follow-up that never materialized. This was one of several Dreamwave Capcom comics that were cut short or simply never made it to issue #1, including Maximo, Darkstalkers and Rival Schools.

The Mario Kart series has received widespread critical and fan acclaim. On Metacritic, all entries in the series hold aggregate review scores of 82 to 91 out of 100, except for Super Mario Kart, which was never reviewed there. On GameRankings, all eight main Mario Kart installments hold very high approval ratings, ranging from 82% (Mario Kart Wii) to 94% (Super Mario Kart). The Mario Kart games have also been praised by many other gaming reviews publishers including Edge, IGN, The Age, GameSpot, and Official Nintendo Magazine among others. In its 250th issue, Nintendo Power stated that the series was one of the greatest multiplayer experiences, citing the diversity in game modes as well as the overall entertainment value.[11] The Mario Kart series has also been lauded by the Guinness Book of World Records, which gave it six records including "First Console Kart Racing Game," "Best Selling Racing Game," and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise," while also naming its SNES debut game the top console game of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[12]


Eventually, Link catches up with Zelda and Impa at the Temple of Time, but their reunion is cut short when Ghirahim attacks the duo. In the midst of the frenetic action, Zelda gives Link the Goddess's Harp before she and Impa escape through the Gate of Time, with Impa destroying the gate to escape Ghirahim's grasp. Link manages to activate a second Gate of Time and meets with Zelda, who explains her true nature as the mortal reincarnation of the Goddess Hylia before telling Link that she,[18] as Hylia reborn, must remain in a deep sleep to keep Demise imprisoned within his seal.[29] Before doing so, Zelda explains that the goddess needed someone with an "unbreakable spirit" to defeat Demise.[51] However, Hylia, knowing that the young hero would "throw [himself] headfirst into any danger, without even a moment's doubt" if it meant saving Zelda,[52] used Link to try and bring about the destruction of Demise. She proceeds to seal herself into a crystal and sleep for thousands of years to ensure Demise's seal holds, and tells Link that he must find and use the Triforce to destroy Demise so that she will be able to wake up in their own time.[53]
Princess is also featured in other media, including comics based on the games, animated shows, and the Super Smash Bros. series. In some of her appearances, she is depicted as a brave, proud, and self-reliant fighter who is proficient in archery and horseback riding, such as in the The Legend of Zelda comics by Valiant Comics and The Legend of Zelda TV series. As with the games, she is the protector of the Triforce of Wisdom.
Mega Man 11 sticks so close to the established formula that it wouldn’t have made much of a splash if it had come out in 2008, or 1998. In fact, it has more in common with 1996’s Mega Man 8 than any other game in the series, and feels like a direct sequel to it. I found Mega Man 11 amusingly difficult even with the help of the time-slowing Double Gear system and there are some cool robot moments, but in a series with such great highs (Mega Man 2, 3, 9,10, specifically) and lows (Mega Man 7), it’s pretty average. The robot bosses are mostly bland and familiar (with the exception of the very silly Block Man – I love that guy), and their imparted weapons are a hit-and-miss collection. But Mega Man plays like he should even with the cutesy but tolerable art style, and that’s good because the challenge is cranked up to 11 and getting through these levels takes old-school precision and patience. Mega Man 11 is a good foundation for the next 10 Mega Man games.
The game introduces the double gear system. Using the shoulder buttons the player is able to activate either the power gear or the speed gear. The power gear makes your shots more powerful and the speed gear slows down enemies. You can only use each of these temporarily, because they'll over heat if you leave them active for too long. If this happens the double gear will will have to recharge before it can be used again. The game is perfectly designed so that you could make do without them, but it will push you to use these systems a lot. Some enemies are easier to dispatch with the speed gear, and most boss fights are made easier with the power gear. It seems gimmicky at first and upon first playing the game you'll often forget you have them, but once you settle in you'll find yourself using these systems more and more as you encounter hazards in levels that will encourage you to do so. There's another added benefit of the double gear system. When critically low on health you can press both shoulders at the same time to activate both the speed gear and power gear simultaneously. It's mostly a last ditch effort when low on health, and you can't actually turn this off, meaning your double gear will have to recharge without fail after its use, but it can help you out in a moment of desperation.

Mario Kart Wii's Battle mode is similar to that seen in previous installments in which players drive around an enclosed arena and attack each other using items. The players are divided into two teams, red and blue, and teammates cannot harm each other with their items. There are two variants of Battle mode available: Balloon Battle and Coin Runners. In Balloon Battle, each player's kart has three attached balloons. A player gains a point each time they pop or steal a balloon belonging to an opposing team player, but loses a point each time they lose all balloons. In Coin Runners, the players collect coins scattered throughout the arena and attack opposing team members to make them drop coins. The team that has accumulated the most points or coins total when the three-minute time limit expires wins.[7]


One of the most common and familiar systems that determines character growth is the job system, a class-based system where players assign characters a job, choosing from series staples such as Black Mage, White Mage, Monk, Thief and Warrior, among many. The character's job determines their base abilities and the stats gained. Throughout earlier games, this was often through experience, though Final Fantasy V introduced ability points as a separate system where the experience would increase a level independent of the job, and the ability points likewise accumulated from battles are used to grow the job's abilities. Many games featuring the job system allow the player to switch the jobs around to learn new abilities or face new enemies, though some, such as the original Final Fantasy, stick the job as fundamental to the character. Similarly, games such as Final Fantasy IX, do not have named job systems, but the characters have defined roles similar to the job system with pre-determined abilities they can learn.
Zelda from The Wind Waker is the first Zelda in the series that fights along Link's side in his battle against Ganondorf. In battle, she wields the bow and Light Arrows, similar to her Twilight Princess counterpart.[31] Once Link and Zelda succeed in delivering the final blow, they witness the second flood of Hyrule and promise the King of Hyrule to search for the new land that will be home to the next kingdom of Hyrule.[121] Zelda is last seen as Tetra when she and Link set sail from Outset Island in search for new lands.[122]
VS Race – Multiple human players race against each other on any course with customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. The mode also includes single-player VS races and CPU controlled players to compete in VS races as well since Mario Kart DS (except for Mario Kart 7). Super Circuit, however, features a Quick Run mode, which shares similarities with VS mode.
A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]
Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.
As the holder of the Triforce of Wisdom, she is wise beyond her years and intelligent enough to rule her people. She always wishes to do what is right for others and is extremely self-sacrificing. Though not always capable of defending herself or others on her own, she does not quit and tries to aid allies when she needs their help. She is also forgiving towards former enemies even when they have harmed her in someway. She is however, extremely loyal towards the ones she cares for (such as Link) and does not tolerate them getting harmed.
Because they had a good relationship with Tetra, they also quickly warmed up to her granddaughter Zelda when she asked for their help. They could also for some unexplained reason, see her even in her spirit form. They have stated Zelda's resemblance to Tetra whom they thought was an intelligent person. Even Byrne was moved by Zelda's words as he sacrificed himself to save New Hyrule despite his earlier intentions. Both Link and Zelda in turn were relieved to hear that Byrne was not truly dead. The Lokomos asked the duo to watch the land in there place, showing that they trust their Hylian allies.
Like previous Mega Man games, the weapons are varied but not all are useful. My favorites were Bounce Man’s B. Ball, a versatile weapon you can easily aim at enemies (similar to Metal Man’s Metal Blade in Mega Man 2); Block Man’s B. Dropper to rain heavy objects down on out-of-reach enemies; and the aforementioned P. Driver for skipping puzzle areas entirely. On the other side, Fuse Man’s S. Thunder is a charge that climbs walls and has few uses, and Blast Man’s C. Blast is a slow moving, remotely-detonated bomb that is way too slow to use in any context in a fast-moving game like Mega Man 11.
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
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