In Breath of the Wild, Zelda rides a White Stallion commonly ridden by her family as a symbol of their divine right. Though her horse is tame it is implied Zelda treated him poorly as she notes to Link she felt that he had to earn the privilege to wear all the Royal Gear. However Link advised her on how to soothe her mount which improved Zelda's relationship and bond with her horse. In an attempt to be more empathetic Zelda equipped her horse with the Royal Gear which she was pleased to discover he wore like a true natural and thanked Link for his advice while riding on Safula Hill. According to local legend, her horse fled to Safula Hill after the fall of Hyrule Castle presumably due to the fond memories it had there of its mistress and the clear view it gave of Hyrule Castle where Zelda sealed herself with Ganon. Toffa implies Zelda's Horse fathered offspring and that the White Horse Link finds their is the grandchild of Zelda's Horse. Zelda is shown riding a White Horse after Ganon's defeat though it is unclear if her original horse was revived/perserved by Malanya or if its the horse Toffa believes to be its descendant.
In Skyward Sword, Zelda is shown to have a father known as Gaepora, whom she seems reasonably close to. The two casually interacted with one another when discussing Link's success at the ceremonial race, to which Zelda voiced her worry. In response, Gaepora reminded Zelda of the importance of a rider and Loftwing`s bond with one another, noting Link`s powerful bond with his Crimson Loftwing. He would also continue on to tease Zelda, jokingly referring her as jealous. Somewhat annoyed at her father`s words, Zelda further voices her worries to him. Seeing Zelda slightly agitated, Gaepora notes her change in behavior when concerning Link. Later on, when Zelda goes missing from a mysterious tornado, Gaepora shows great concern for his daughter and asks Link to save her.
Character concept artwork was handled by Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy VI who also handled logo and promotional image designs for games to follow. He was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura from Final Fantasy VII onwards (with the exception of Final Fantasy IX—where it was handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana and Shin Nagasawa—and Final Fantasy XII—where it was handled by Akihiko Yoshida).
Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)

Many games offer different systems to allow more freedom when growing characters' abilities and stats beginning as early as Final Fantasy II. Often this features a mix of the ability points system, in which points are used to grow abilities without being determined by a job. One of the popular systems is the Materia system featured in Final Fantasy VII and other games in its sub-series, where the player equips characters with Materia that contain various command or support abilities, and accumulating ability points allows the Materia to grow and gain stat boosts and new abilities. Similarly, the magicite featured in Final Fantasy VI allows the player to equip magicite remains of espers with the accumulated ability points allowing the characters to learn the magic spells they contain, and once reaching a certain threshold the character learns the ability permanently to use it even without the equipped magicite. This way the player can directly control which party members use which skills and customize their party to their preferred play style.


The series features a number of recurring character archetypes. Most famously, every game since Final Fantasy II, including subsequent remakes of the original Final Fantasy, features a character named Cid. Cid's appearance, personality, goals, and role in the game (non-playable ally, party member, villain) vary dramatically. However, two characteristics many versions of Cid have in common are 1) being a scientist or engineer, and 2) being tied in some way to an airship the party eventually acquires. Every Cid has at least one of these two traits.
Additionally, Zelda seems to recognize Link's name upon their first meeting.[6] This could be attributed to her prophetic abilities, although the boy in her dreams seemed to be a largely abstract figure, with no defining traits aside from the presence of a guardian Fairy and a Spiritual Stone. This line of dialogue has often been regarded as a sign that the two have met before, although this could only have occurred when Link was a baby per the Deku Tree Sprout's account of Link's coming to Kokiri Forest. It is also worth noting that while the King of Hyrule is clearly identified as Zelda's father, no mention is made of a Queen. Meanwhile, Link's mother is stated to have died shortly after reaching the forest, but no information is given concerning his father. Given these facts, it is possible that Zelda and Link share the same parents, making them siblings.
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]
Final Fantasy is a video game franchise developed and published by Square Enix. It is a Japanese role-playing game series with varying gameplay, settings and stories between each installment, retaining plot and gameplay elements throughout, focusing on fantasy and science fantasy settings. Though the core series is a role-playing game franchise, it has branched into other genres, such as MMORPGs, tactical role-playing games, action role-playing games, and fighting games. The series has been distributed on many platforms, beginning with the Nintendo Entertainment System, and including consoles, computers, mobile operating systems and game streaming services. The series has also branched into other forms of media, particularly films, novels, and manga.
*Nintendo Account required. Online features will be free until the Nintendo Switch Online service launches in 2018. After the free-trial period, most games will require a paid online service subscription from Nintendo in order to play online. Currently, the free-trial period, the paid service, and online play (for applicable modes in compatible games) will be available for customers in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. For the latest list of countries, please visit Customer Support.
Down special Default Leaf Shield 2% (circling), 3.8% (thrown) Mega Man summons leaf-shaped units that electromagnetically orbit around him. The leaves block projectiles, and can be fired forwards by pressing an attack button to land multiple hits, or used to deal additional damage to a grabbed enemy. The move is based on Wood Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.
Mega Man (ロックマン, Rockman) is a newcomer in Super Smash Bros. 4. He was announced at Nintendo's E3 2013 Direct Conference presentation for the game, becoming the first-revealed of the six third-party characters in the game along with SEGA's Sonic and Bayonetta, Bandai Namco's Pac-Man, fellow Capcom character Ryu, and Square Enix's Cloud. He does not widely use hand-to-hand combat, instead relying on the large arsenal of ranged weaponry he has amassed by defeating boss characters in his own games. His sound effects are reused from the vast number of retro Mega Man games he has appeared in.
Jump up ↑ "The prince immediately questioned the princess, but she wouldn't tell him anything. After the prince, the magician threatened to put the princess into an enternal sleep if she did not talk, but even still, she said nothing. In his anger, the magician tried to cast a magic spell on the princess. The surprised prince tried to stop him, but the magician fought off the prince and went on chanting the spell. Then, when the spell was finally cast, Princess Zelda fell on that spot and enter a sleep from which she might never awake. At the same time, the magician also fell down and breathe his last." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 7, 8)
However, Cole releases his master before Link and Zelda could stop him. No longer in imprisonment, Malladus possesses Zelda's body, seeking to wreak havoc across New Hyrule and beyond. Using a specially made Phantom, Zelda aids Link in defeating Cole and forcing Malladus out of her body. With Byrne holding Malladus off, Zelda swiftly returns to her body, much to her joy. Immediately though, Byrne is defeated by Malladus, with the Demon King proceeding to use Cole's body as a new vessel. Having little time to spare, Link and Zelda perform a duet using the Spirit Flute and Zelda's sacred powers, with the Lokomo's joining in. Their combined powers significantly weaken Malladus, allowing Link and Zelda to finish him off. Soon after, Zelda joins Link in saying their farewells to the Lokomo, where they learn that Byrne will be reborn, though without the memories of past events. Afterwards, the ending credits show Zelda and Link back to New Hyrule castle, much to everyone's relief.
So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
However, after Mega Man defeated the second set of four Robot Masters, he made his way to where Ballade was waiting and defeated him for a second time, acquiring the Ballade Cracker, which he used to blast his way out of Wily's crumbling fortress. Mega Man made his way to the Wily Battleship and defeated Wily, but was trapped in the fortress when Wily activated a self-destruct mechanism. Ballade, realizing his mistakes, decides to sacrifice himself at the last minute to save Mega Man in the end.
WatchMojo.com has frequently placed titles in the series in top ten lists, including top 10 JRPGs of all time*,[76] top 10 PSOne games*,[77] top ten PSOne RPGs*,[78] top ten PlayStation games of all time*,[79] and top ten Super Nintendo RPGs*.[80] The series held seven Guinness World Records in its Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, including "Most Games in an RPG Series", "Longest Development Period"* and "Fastest Selling Console RPG in a Single Day";[81] in the subsequent issue in 2009, two titles in the series featured in its top 50 console games*.[82]
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
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