The Final Fantasy series has also featured a more basic, traditional turn-based system, such as the original Final Fantasy through to Final Fantasy III that do not rely on time, but the player and the enemy party take turns executing commands. Final Fantasy X features a Conditional Turn-Based Battle system where turns are taken based on an Act List, the turn order depending on the units' stats and statuses, and commands being ranked usually with stronger commands having longer "recovery time" until the unit can act again.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[92][93][94] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[93][95] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[96]
As I understand it, Nintendo is keen to have a Zelda game launch on Switch every year. Following 2017 epic Breath of the Wild, 2018 had a port of spin-off Hyrule Warriors. Is Skyward Sword HD Nintendo's Zelda game for 2019? Nintendo traditionally turns up to The Game Awards every year with something new to show. And guess what - that's next week! Maybe we'll hear something then.
Zelda is the daughter of the King of Hyrule, and eventually the Seventh Sage and the holder of the Triforce of Wisdom. She is also the leader of the Sages. The heir to the Royal Family, Zelda is of the Hylian race with blonde hair and blue eyes. She begins the game as a young girl about 10-12 years old, who is gifted with psychic abilities. In a dream of symbolic importance, she senses Ganondorf's treachery and predicts Link's arrival before either occurs. When Link meets her for the first time in Hyrule Castle's courtyard, she sends him on a quest to collect the three Spiritual Stones and protect the Triforce from Ganondorf. When Ganondorf attacks Hyrule Castle, Zelda and her nursemaid, Impa, flee the castle on horseback.
Mega Man has a solar energy intake above his head and a compact, supercomputer brain. His body has a solar-pile reactor developed by Dr. Light, an EPROM and the circuit board. His body armor is constructed of a unique, flexible, ceramic titanium alloy that bends under severe impacts then retains its shape, rather than breaking or shattering. His legs have suspension and air pressure pumps below the feet that help in his jumps and cushion his landings, even from great heights. He has magnetic joints.[15]
Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[130][131] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[132] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[133] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[132] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[114]
While she was not the first Princess Zelda in the history of Hyrule, she was the first in a long line of princesses to be named Zelda by law and not tradition after she was put into a deep sleep for many generations. Her brother, the Prince of Hyrule at the end of its Golden Era, who was partly to blame for her comatose state, decided that, in honor of his sister, every princess born into the Royal Family of Hyrule should be named Zelda.[41][42]
The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
For the first few installments a key plot point was the Crystals. Each world would feature four, each representing the four elements, and without them the world would deteriorate. The antagonists often begin by destroying or stealing these Crystals for power, and the party would fail to prevent them and be forced to foil their grander scheme later. This plot was abandoned in Final Fantasy VI, and while the games would still feature Crystals, they often did not have the same importance.
Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)
The series centers on Link, the playable character and chief protagonist. Link is often given the task of rescuing Princess Zelda and the kingdom of Hyrule from Ganon, who is the principal antagonist of the series; however, other settings and antagonists have appeared in several games. The plots commonly involve a relic known as the Triforce, a set of three omnipotent golden triangles. The protagonist in each game is usually not the same incarnation of Link, but a few exceptions exist.

At the 2006 Game Developers Conference, a trailer for Phantom Hourglass for the Nintendo DS was shown. It revealed traditional top-down Zelda gameplay optimised for the DS' features, with a cel-shaded 3d graphical style similar to The Wind Waker. At E3 2006, Nintendo confirmed the game's status as a direct sequel to The Wind Waker,[86] and released an extensive playable demo, including a multiplayer mode with "capture the flag" elements. Phantom Hourglass was released on June 23, 2007, in Japan, October 1, 2007, in North America and October 19, 2007, in Europe.
Mario Kart Wii is a kart racing game featuring single-player and multiplayer modes. The players control of one of many selectable Mario franchise characters and participate in races or battles using karts or bikes on courses thematically based on locations from the Mario franchise. During gameplay, the player views the action from a third-person perspective that tracks the player from behind his or her kart. The player can perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, drifting, slipstreaming, and wheelies (bikes only).[3]
Down smash Flame Blast 17% (clean), 14% (mid), 9% (late) Mega Man plants both arm cannons into the ground, causing two vertical flaming pillars to erupt from the ground either side of him which launch the opponent upwards. It has quick startup, but notoriously long endlag that leaves it highly punishable if not landed. Immense knockback when hit with the first frames of the hitbox, which can KO starting at 60% when fully charged. It boasts incredible power, being the fourth-strongest down smash in SSB4, behind Lucario at maximum aura, Ganondorf, and Bowser Jr.. It is based on Flame Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
Settings often contain elements based on real-world mythology, and the series features many allusions to religion. A notable example are ancient mythological creatures that function as summons, and have various different roles within the game lores. Espers from Final Fantasy VI are a magical race that once lived alongside humans until a war wiped most of them out. Aeons in Final Fantasy X are the physical realizations of the dreams of the fayth, and summoners use them to battle Sin. Many games featuring summoned monsters do not have them as a named race, or give them a key role within the lore, the summons being merely abilities to be used in battle.
Mega Man does have some notable flaws, however: While Mega Man has a good amount of attacks with good knockback, the majority of his kill moves are considered situational, difficult to set up, or and/or are easy to punish. As such, he has a more difficult time killing than other characters and it requires good reads to successfully finish off opponents. Characters that have a move that either reflects projectiles or can nullify them (such as Fox or Lady Palutena) can also prove to be an annoyance for him due to his over-reliance on projectiles to combo opponents and bait reactions and it can render his Forward Smash (one of his better kill moves) unreliable, though this can be worked around by firing the Mega Buster twice at a time, and most reflectors are punishable if baited and he can still grab them. Although Mega Man can effectively zone opponents at medium ranges with the Mega Buster, most of his other moves are fairly laggy or gimmicky and his only reliable tool in close range is his grab, and as such faster characters (such as Greninja or Captain Falcon) can bypass his zoning more easily and put work on him in closer ranges and due to his above average weight and falling speed, Mega Man is somewhat easy for these characters to combo once they get in, assuming that they have any combo potential.
Zelda as Tetra displayed a tomboyish demeanor, taking challenges head on and even seeming bossy at times. At the beginning of the game, she does not think much of Link due to his habit of taking actions without thinking things through, and also due to the fact that he gets melancholic as they are setting sail to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue his sister.[117] Once Tetra discovers her true identity, she gains more respect towards the young hero, and apologizes for all that has happened to him and Aryll.[118] While Link and the King of Red Lions set out to look for the pieces of the Triforce of Courage, Zelda stays hidden away in a basement located inside Hyrule Castle in order to prevent getting caught by Ganondorf.[119] However, she is eventually found and is taken to Ganon's Tower, where Link must rescue her after assembling the Triforce of Courage.[120]

The good news is Mega Man 11 is pretty good. It's everything I expected from a Mega Man game. It does play it relatively safe, however. There is no risk to the formula or design, but this is necessary because the goal needs to be to get Mega Man back on track. That being said, just because it plays it safe doesn't mean it has nothing to offer. The level designs are extremely good (with Block Man's stage being a near perfect tutorial on how to make use of the game's new Double Gear system) and the levels are fairly lengthy and challenging to keep you going. It makes the game inviting, but Mega Man hasn't lost its trademark difficulty. The game is hard. If the clever level designs don't stump you every now and then, some of the bosses will.
Before Dr. Light ever constructed what would eventually become Mega Man, he first designed the robot known as "Proto Man" ("Blues" in Japan) which similar to his name was designed as a prototype of his future creations. Dr. Light's achievement greatly exceeded his expectations, however, he found a critical problem on Proto Man's power reactor. He made plans to modify and repair him, but the robot ran away, fearing that he would lose his identity and become like a different person.
Three Zelda-themed LCD games were created between 1989 and 1992. The Zelda version of Nintendo's Game & Watch series was released first in August 1989 as a dual-screen handheld electronic game similar in appearance to today's Nintendo DS. It was re-released in 1998 as a Toymax, Inc. Mini Classic and was later included as an unlockable extra in Game & Watch Gallery 4, a 2002 compilation for the Game Boy Advance. While the Game & Watch Zelda was developed in-house by Nintendo, the subsequent two LCD games were developed by third parties under license by Nintendo. In October 1989, The Legend of Zelda was developed by Nelsonic as part of its Game Watch line. This game was an actual digital watch with primitive gameplay based on the original Legend of Zelda. In 1992, Epoch Co. developed Zelda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Triforce for its Barcode Battler II console. The game employed card-scanning technology similar to the later-released Nintendo e-Reader.
The Classic series has not reached a definite conclusion, Originally developed for the NES, the original Mega Man series experienced graphical improvements in fourth and fifth generation installments. The series had no games developed for sixth generation consoles but returned in the seventh generation purposely sporting graphics, sound and gameplay similar to the original NES games to inspire a nostalgic look and feel, distributed as downloadable content instead of retail games like the previous installments.

Of the various "Mega Men", classic series Rockman is the only one with blue eyes. All other characters to bear the name "Mega Man" have green eyes. Curiously in the PSP remake Mega Man Powered Up his eye color is changed to green (though the artwork for the game shows him with blue eyes). In the Mega Man Megamix illustrations, his eye color is also depicted as green.
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][94] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
After putting 20+ hours into this game over the weekend I have decided it is far and above my favorite Zelda game. My most wonderful experience so far has been seeing an island a ways off the map, getting on a raft and leaving the map to check out said island, and it has a challenge where you lose all your items and have a mission to complete on the island. I sadly didn't beat the challenge (having 4 hearts is why) but it was an experience off the map (literally) and one you had to look our for to find. The game rewards you for leaving the path that letting you run wild. I feel as if I have done so much, but at the same time keep realizing I have barely scratched the surface of this masterpiece. GOTY for sure. This game is worth both the 60 dollars for it, and the 300 dollars for the switch.
The series has received criticism for many other aspects. Many have found the menu-based combat system and its use of random encounters to be a turnoff, or an outdated annoyance,[54][55] with IGN stating the the use of random encounters "need[ed] to change".[56] The series' minigames have been divisive and often come under fire as weaker aspects[57][58][59] (although minigames have received praise in other regard[60]). Finally, many direct sequels in the series have been poorly received and believed to be worse than the original titles.[61][62][63]
In the portable entries, the series also performed outstanding sales. Mario Kart: Super Circuit, has sold a total of 5.9 million copies, making it the fourth best-selling game on the Game Boy Advance.[14] The second portable game, Mario Kart DS, has sold a total of 23.60 million copies.[15] The third best-selling game for the Nintendo DS, it is also the best-selling portable game in the series.[15] Mario Kart 7, released for the Nintendo 3DS, has sold 17.21 million copies, and is the best-selling 3DS game as of June 2018.[17]

Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.
Mario Kart 7 features stereoscopic 3D graphics, introduces hang gliding and submersible karts, and features an alternate first-person perspective and kart customization.[3] Introduces Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen as new playable characters. It is also the first Mario Kart game after Mario Kart: Double Dash!! not to feature Waluigi as a playable character.

Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game.

Up tilt Mega/Rock Upper 17% (clean), 12% (mid), 8% (late) A quick rising uppercut. Based on the move of the same name from Mega Man 2: The Power Fighters, Marvel vs. Capcom and Street Fighter X Tekken, which is itself a tribute to the Shoryuken from the Street Fighter series. For a tilt, it has incredible power (in fact being stronger than his uncharged up smash), with the sweetspot having as much power as some smash attacks and being able to reliably KO medium-light characters under 90%. It has little starting lag but very high ending lag and little horizontal range. It also pushes Mega Man forward a slight distance; if Mega Man uses the move near a ledge, he will fall off and grab the ledge.
Hit the road with the definitive version of Mario Kart 8 and play anytime, anywhere! Race your friends or battle them in a revised battle mode on new and returning battle courses. Play locally in up to 4-player multiplayer in 1080p while playing in TV Mode. Every track from the Wii U version, including DLC, makes a glorious return. Plus, the Inklings appear as all-new guest characters, along with returning favorites, such as King Boo, Dry Bones, and Bowser Jr.!
Mega Man 11 sticks so close to the established formula that it wouldn’t have made much of a splash if it had come out in 2008, or 1998. In fact, it has more in common with 1996’s Mega Man 8 than any other game in the series, and feels like a direct sequel to it. I found Mega Man 11 amusingly difficult even with the help of the time-slowing Double Gear system and there are some cool robot moments, but in a series with such great highs (Mega Man 2, 3, 9,10, specifically) and lows (Mega Man 7), it’s pretty average. The robot bosses are mostly bland and familiar (with the exception of the very silly Block Man – I love that guy), and their imparted weapons are a hit-and-miss collection. But Mega Man plays like he should even with the cutesy but tolerable art style, and that’s good because the challenge is cranked up to 11 and getting through these levels takes old-school precision and patience. Mega Man 11 is a good foundation for the next 10 Mega Man games.
The series often features other mythological references, such as Kefka Palazzo and Sephiroth's godforms based on divinity as their final encounters in Final Fantasy VI and Final Fantasy VII. The game worlds themselves are commonly based on real-world mythology, such as Final Fantasy X and its Shinto and Buddhism influences, and the influence of Jewish mysticism in Final Fantasy VII.
Take part in an epic and ever-changing FINAL FANTASY as you adventure and explore with friends from around the world. The complete edition is perfect for newcomers as it includes the award-winning FINAL FANTASY XIV: A Realm Reborn and the Heavensward and Stormblood expansion packs! Join others from around the world and start your own FINAL FANTASY adventure today!
Since Mario Kart 64, all player-characters have been grouped into one of three distinct weight classifications. Smaller characters, labeled as "lightweights," have high acceleration but low top speeds, and lose a minimal amount of speed when off-road but are easily knocked aside by heavier opponents. Medium-sized characters, or "middleweights," have an equal balance of weight, top speed, and acceleration, and lose a moderate amount of speed when off-road. The largest characters, labeled as "heavyweights," can easily knock aside most opposing racers, have high top speeds but poor acceleration, and lose great amounts of speed when off-road.
I'm eight chapters in, which I believe is a little over halfway through the game, and the plot is not drawing me in at all. Many Final Fantasies lead with the main narrative element of "defeat the evil empire that wrecked your home/kingdom/city/planet", and Final Fantasy XV is no exception. This is not a bad thing, but unfortunately whoever was in charge of piecing this into a cohesive narrative seems to have twiddled his thumbs for nine-tenths of the decade it took to make this game.. in fact, it honestly seems like this happened with the whole game. Ten whole years, and it feels like they rushed it out in the last year and a half. I can definitely see why they delayed it another few months from its initial September release date. Imagine what it would've been like then?
Side special Default Crash Bomber 1% (loop), 4% (last) Fires a grappling bomb attached to a drill that latches on to any surface or fighter it touches, before exploding a few seconds later. Much like a Gooey Bomb, it can be transferred between players before it detonates but has a shorter timer and the explosion can be safely shielded. The bomb can travel a good distance until it disappears. Can be used to bait a shield grab, or shot against the stage while recovering to deny edgeguarding or extend Mega Man's own recovery. The move is based on Crash Man's weapon in Mega Man 2.
After the events of Mega Man II, Dr. Wily took control of an off-shore oil platform with some of his powerful Robot Masters. Once again, Dr. Light sends Mega Man to investigate and stop them before it gets out of hand. Mega Man takes down the first four Robot Masters and makes his way to the Wily Castle, where he discovers that four more Robot Masters await him. After defeating them, he encounters a new Mega Man Killer named Punk in the Wily Station, whose Screw Crusher delivers a crushing blow to its opponents. However, Mega Man promptly defeats Punk and defeats Wily with Punk's own weapon.
When Link retrieves the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid, he is overcome with memories about his departure from Hyrule. In a flashback, the young Princess Zelda from Ocarina of Time is seen saying her goodbyes to Link; she gives him the Ocarina of Time to help him on his journey, and teaches him the "Song of Time" again, which becomes vital to his quest. Zelda makes no further appearances.

She often wears jewelry such as ornate earrings (which in some games feature a Triforce design), as well as a royal gown of white, pink, lavender, or another pale color (red in The Adventure of Link), usually bearing the Royal Family's crest. Zelda has also been depicted in casual attire, such as in Skyward Sword, or in a blue shirt with Hylian embroideries as the Champions commander in Breath of the Wild.
Up smash	Spark Shock	2% (hit 1), 1.5% (hits 2-6), 6% (hit 7)	Mega Man turns both of his hands into electrodes, creating a powerful multi-hitting surge of electricity above him. It is overall useful due to its large hitbox, anti-air properties and quick startup, though it has noticeable ending lag. If an opponent is made tiny by a Lightning Bolt, it's possible to OHKO them. Based on Spark Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.

Back to Zelda though, the atmosphere, graphics, sound and gameplay are all SPOT ON. There's crafting of Food, Potions, Weapons and Armor as well as a bunch of quests, side quests and tons of hidden content to keep you engrossed for at least the next several months... The Game of the Year buzz that this game has received is 100% deserved. Get this game! You will LOVE It!
In Breath of the Wild, Zelda is one of Link's companions along with Mipha, Daruk, Revali and Urbosa. She wears a blue shirt with Hylian embroideries on it, similar to Link's one and the scarves worn by the four allies. They were all members of the Champions, a group of protectors of Hyrule and the ancient relics, created by her father King Rhoam and commanded by Zelda herself.
Jump up ↑ "When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand... Together with the Hero of Time, the awakened ones will bind the evil and return the light of peace to the world..." — Sheik (Ocarina of Time)
Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]
Souls creator Hidetaka Miyazaki (FromSoftware) named A Link To The Past as one of his favorite role-playing video games.[200] According to Miyazaki, "The Legend of Zelda became a sort of textbook for 3D action games."[201] Ico director Fumito Ueda (Team Ico) cited Zelda as an influence on Shadow of the Colossus.[202] Fable series director Peter Molyneux (Lionhead Studios, Microsoft Studios) stated that Twilight Princess is one of his favorite games. "I just feel it's jaw-dropping and its use of the hardware was brilliant. And I've played that game through several times," he said to TechRadar.[203] Darksiders director David L. Adams (Vigil Games) cited Zelda as an influence on his work.[204] Prince of Persia and Assassin's Creed director Raphael Lacoste (Ubisoft) cited The Wind Waker as an influence on Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag.[205] CD Projekt Red (The Witcher, Cyberpunk 2077) cited the Zelda series as an influence on The Witcher series, including The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.[206] Final Fantasy and The 3rd Birthday director Hajime Tabata (Square Enix) cited Ocarina of Time as inspiration for the seamless open world of Final Fantasy XV.[207]
The next game released in the series was Four Swords Adventures for the GameCube, which was released in early 2004 in Japan and America, and January 2005 in Europe. Based on the handheld Four Swords, Four Swords Adventures was another deviation from previous Zelda gameplay, focusing on level-based and multiplayer gameplay. The game contains 24 levels and a map screen; there is no connecting overworld. For multiplayer features, each player must use a Game Boy Advance system linked to the GameCube via a Nintendo GameCube – Game Boy Advance link cable. The game features a single-player campaign, in which using a Game Boy Advance is optional.
While I can overlook and even grudgingly appreciate the graphics, it’s the sound that is Mega Man 11’s biggest oversight. For a series so famous for its tunes, the sedate, repetitive, techno background is a real letdown: Why not just use cool, retro-sounding chiptunes like the rest of the games if you don’t have any strong new musical ideas? Mega Man 11 also has some terrifically bad voice acting, which I actually got a kick out of -- but eventually, the repetitive callouts (Speed Gear!) got on my coworkers’ nerves, prompting them to politely ask me to turn it down. You can choose to view subtitles and hear what few dialogue lines there are in Japanese, but if you did that you’d be missing out on Mega Man’s new, rich baritone -- only in English! I guess after 10 games in 31 years he really has become a Man.
In 2002, a follow-up series to the Mega Man X franchise was developed for the Game Boy Advance which starred Zero, a character created for the Mega Man X series as a sidekick/ally of Mega Man. The series revolved around Zero battling a powerful human-supremacy force as he protects the oppressed remaining reploids. In the Mega Man Zero series, the gameplay is largely similar to Zero's play style in the later Mega Man X games and features an in-depth ranking system that rewards the player with new abilities and enhancements (such as copied abilities from boss characters) in exchange for better play performance. In the fourth game, Zero can also physically steal weapons from enemies (such as axes and guns).
The central conflict in many Final Fantasy games focuses on a group of characters battling an evil, and sometimes ancient, antagonist that dominates the game's world. Stories frequently involve a sovereign state in rebellion, with the protagonists taking part in the rebellion. The heroes are often destined to defeat the evil, and occasionally gather as a direct result of the antagonist's malicious actions.[3][74] Another staple of the series is the existence of two villains; the main villain is not always who it appears to be, as the primary antagonist may actually be subservient to another character or entity.[3] The main antagonist introduced at the beginning of the game is not always the final enemy, and the characters must continue their quest beyond what appears to be the final fight.[74]
After Zelda was born, her parents named her Zelda in accordance with royal tradition and her mother would eventually take the infant Zelda to Gerudo Town to introduce her daughter to her close friend Gerudo Chieftain Urbosa. For the first six years of her life Zelda was raised by both parents and apparently had a happy childhood for a time. Her mother encouraged Zelda she could do anything and told her about the latent power she inherited from her grandmother whom is implied to have been a previous Zelda indicating her mother was not of royal blood. When Zelda was six years old, her mother died, changing her life and putting her under the protection of her father exclusively thereafter. Unfortunately her mother's death robbed her of her mother's unconditional support and prevented the Queen from acting as Zelda's teacher as she was apparently knowledgeable about Zelda's powers. However Zelda hide her grief as her parents had taught her to be a strong steadfast Princess which King Rhoam found inspiring though failed to see his daughter was hurting and her inability to awaken the sealing power needed to seal Calamity Ganon away, causing her great stress. Zelda struggled to awaken her powers and a year after her mother's funeral Urbosa accompanied Zelda to the Spring of Power where Zelda futilely prayed for her powers to awaken until Urbosa dragged her out of the cold water causing Zelda to break down and cry confiding her true feelings and revealing her grief and the stress she was under while Urbosa listened and consoled her. She ended up befriending Urbosa who did her best to help her. However Zelda came to believe her mother was wrong about her capabilities feeling more and more like a failure.

After Link finds a second Gate of Time and goes to the past, he meets up with Zelda there. It is then revealed that Zelda is the reincarnation of Hylia. She also confesses to manipulating Link's feelings for her (as Hylia) so that he could fulfill his destiny, a deed for which she is very remorseful. In order to maintain Demise's imprisonment, Zelda seals herself. While doing so, Zelda asks Link for him to wake her up when his mission is complete.


As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.
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