The first game in the Mega Man ZX series was released in 2006. It takes place about 200 years after the Zero series in which progression has led to the mixing of physical attributes between humans and robots; humans are given the physical advantages of robots, and robots are given lifespans. Therefore, this is the first game in the main storyline in which the player can control a human character. Players collect Biometals containing data on the legendary heroes of the past (including X, Zero, and the Four Guardians of the Mega Man Zero series). Using these Biometals, they are able to "Mega-Merge" with them to don the powers of the fallen heroes.

Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game.
Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.

Zelda Month has come and gone much too quickly. But for those who might’ve missed it, PeanutButterGamer (PBG) released his final video for the month just over a week ago. PGB, who started Zelda Month in 2011, puts a twist on his traditional videos with a Zelda product review. In the video, he takes some of the most interesting Zelda items from eBay and, in usual PBG spirit, reviews them with a kooky flair and comical hijinks. Give it a…
The spin-offs' gameplay can deviate a lot from the main series. While spin-offs tend to include gameplay fundamentals, if only in abilities and ability names, many stick to role-playing game elements. As an example, although Dissidia Final Fantasy and games following its format are fighting games, they still feature character growth, characters using their specific abilities, and similar equipment systems. Another notable spin-off, Final Fantasy Tactics, is a tactical role-playing game with a job system that uses tactical unit command as opposed to one of the battle systems featured throughout the main series. Many games also feature action elements, such as Final Fantasy Type-0, while others include shooting elements, such as Dirge of Cerberus -Final Fantasy VII-, but still keep the series fundamentals.
In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Zelda is revealed to be the hope of the people.[85] She is the one who sends Impa to Labrynna and Holodrum to find Nayru, the Oracle of Ages,[86] and Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and bring them to Hyrule for safety. Zelda herself appears if the two games are linked. When players have defeated both General Onox and Veran in the linked game, Twinrova will kidnap Zelda in order to sacrifice her to resurrect Ganon.[87] Link dashes to her rescue and Twinrova fails to sacrifice Zelda, making them to sacrifice themselves in order to resurrect Ganon. Due to the fact that they could not sacrifice Zelda as planned, the Ganon they resurrect is mindless and raging and is defeated by Link. In these games, Zelda has a sprite similar to that of Marin, the girl Link mistakes for Zelda when he wakes up at the beginning of Link's Awakening.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][82] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.

The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]

The title theme of The Wind Waker is an absolutely magical piece of music. Inspired by traditional Irish music, the theme makes excellent use of strings and harps to capture the freedom and whimsy of Link’s seafaring adventure. Admittedly, as great as it is, I never thought this tune was versatile enough to exist beyond its original genre. But count me proven wrong, because musician Ace Waters has released an amazing synth cover of The Wind Waker‘s title theme that…
Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.
Hit the road with the definitive version of Mario Kart 8 and play anytime, any-where! Race your friends or battle them in a revised battle mode on new and returning battle courses. Play locally in up to 4-player multiplayer in 1080p while playing in TV Mode. Every track from the Wii U version, including DLC, makes a glorious return. Plus, the Inklings appear as all-new guest characters, along with returning favorites, such as King Boo, Dry Bones, and Bowser Jr.!

Explore the wilds of Hyrule any way you like—anytime, anywhere! - Climb up towers and mountain peaks in search of new destinations, then set your own path to get there and plunge into the wilderness. Along the way, you'll battle towering enemies, hunt wild beasts and gather ingredients for the food and elixirs you'll make to sustain you on your journey. With Nintendo Switch, you can literally take your journey anywhere.
In Battle Mode, players go head to head on one of a number of dedicated Battle Mode courses, usually designed as closed arenas. Each player starts with three balloons and loses a balloon with every hit sustained; the last player possessing at least one balloon wins. In addition to the classic battle game, different variants of this mode were added as the series progressed, including one that involves capturing a Shine Sprite and maintaining possession of it for a certain period of time; and one that involves throwing Bob-ombs at other players to earn points. Starting with Mario Kart Wii, there is a time limit for each battle. For Mario Kart 8, the battles take place on race courses. In Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7 and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, the player will respawn after losing all balloons, instead of getting eliminated.
Mega Man currently ranks 27th on the SSB4 tier list, in C tier as a high tier character. Mega Man's most prevalent advantage is that he has among the best projectile games in Smash 4, with his wide array of projectiles being able to keep opponents away. He excels in pressuring as a result, with his Crash Bomber able to pressure shields easily, Metal Blade being an overall useful tool for forcing approaches, shield pressure and edgeguarding, and a useful mid-range spacing tool with his Mega Buster. This is made more effective once combined with Mega Man's grab game; his grab is among the fastest in the game, with his down throw being a decent combo starter, while his back throw is a decent damage racker and KO option at high percents. Mega Man also possesses above-average endurance due to his high weight and falling speed, which ties in with an effective recovery in Rush Coil that doesn't cause him to go helpless. Some of Mega Man's finishes are also among the strongest in the game, such as his up tilt and down smash. Finally, owing to his high air friction, Mega Man also has extremely fluid control in the air, including the ability to zig-zag while jumping.

With the success of these two test-type robots, Light designed and built six industrial robots, mainly to be used in the construction and maintenance of public works. These robots were Cut Man, a timber felling robot; Guts Man, a construction robot; Ice Man, a robot designed for exploration in extreme freezing temperatures; Bomb Man, a land reclamation robot; Fire Man, designed for waste management; and Elec Man, designed to oversee and control atomic energy power plants. (Mega Man Powered Up introduced two more Robot Masters: Time Man, a time researcher robot, and Oil Man, an oil maintenance robot.) Each of these robots had full use of a human-like intelligence and reasoning potential. However, little did Dr. Light know that all of these robots, including the missing Proto Man, would later serve as the key to unlocking Rock's destiny.


Final Fantasy has spawned numerous spin-offs and metaseries. Several are, in fact, not Final Fantasy games, but were rebranded for North American release. Examples include the SaGa series, rebranded The Final Fantasy Legend, and its two sequels, Final Fantasy Legend II and Final Fantasy Legend III.[38] Final Fantasy Mystic Quest was specifically developed for a United States audience, and Final Fantasy Tactics is a tactical RPG that features many references and themes found in the series.[39][40] The spin-off Chocobo series, Crystal Chronicles series, and Kingdom Hearts series also include multiple Final Fantasy elements.[38][41] In 2003, the Final Fantasy series' first direct sequel, Final Fantasy X-2, was released.[42] Final Fantasy XIII was originally intended to stand on its own, but the team wanted to explore the world, characters and mythos more, resulting in the development and release of two sequels in 2011 and 2013 respectively, creating the series' first official trilogy.[28] Dissidia Final Fantasy was released in 2009, a fighting game that features heroes and villains from the first ten games of the main series.[43] It was followed by a prequel in 2011.[44] Other spin-offs have taken the form of subseries—Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Ivalice Alliance, and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy.
A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.
Valiant Comics released a short series of comics featuring characters and settings from the Zelda cartoon as part of their Nintendo Comics System line. Manga adaptations of many entries in the series, including A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Four Swords Adventures, The Minish Cap, and Phantom Hourglass, have been produced under license from Nintendo, mostly in Japan. These cartoons are usually not involved with the chronology of the actual games.[clarification needed]
The traditional Mega Man boss design is another knock against the Power Gear as a useful ability. Because bosses already have vulnerabilities to certain weapons, there’s no point in amping up the weapons that already easily cut them down, and increasing the damage of weapons that barely do any is like upgrading your Nerf gun to Super Soaker. However, I found two pretty cool uses for the Power Gear. One is that Tundra Man’s T. Storm can be amplified to wipe out all enemies on screen like a more efficient Infinite Gauntlet. People watching me play in the office got a kick out of me hitting what amounted to the “nuke’em from orbit” button when frustration set in. The second is Impact Man’s P. Driver ability, which is a mid-air dash attack which is more useful for getting around because its charged form lets you zoom across the whole screen. See ya, disappearing block puzzle!
Skyward Sword shook up the series in other ways, too. It removed Zelda's traditional large overworld, and instead used smaller, separate areas designed to be played multiple times, albeit with radical changes for each visit. And then there was Fi, the magical spirit which lived in Link's famous Master Sword. Many fans compared her chattiness to that of Ocarina of Time's Navi - and not in a good way.

Mega Man then went to Dr. Wily's castle and defeated Dr. Wily again. Dr. Wily, as usual, begged Mega Man for forgiveness. Mega Man responded to this by having Rush play clips of all the times Wily had done the same routine (the clips being scenes from previous games). Although Wily seemed contrite and apologetic, he tricked Mega Man into thinking that Dr. Light was, in fact, imprisoned in a jail cell in the next room. Although Proto Man appeared and warned him that it was a trap, Mega Man went to investigate the cell and was electrocuted by the fake Light robot and Wily set his hideout to self-destruct. Proto Man saved Mega Man, but Wily escaped yet again.


The Legend of Zelda games feature a mixture of puzzles, action, adventure/battle gameplay, and exploration. These elements have remained constant throughout the series, but with refinements and additions featured in each new game. Later games in the series also include stealth gameplay, where the player must avoid enemies while proceeding through a level, as well as racing elements. Although the games can be beaten with a minimal amount of exploration and side quests, the player is frequently rewarded with helpful items or increased abilities for solving puzzles or exploring hidden areas. Some items are consistent and appear many times throughout the series (such as bombs and bomb flowers, which can be used both as weapons and to open blocked or hidden doorways; boomerangs, which can kill or paralyze enemies; keys for locked doors; magic swords, shields, and bows and arrows), while others are unique to a single game. Though the games contain many role-playing elements (Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is the only one to include an experience system), they emphasize straightforward hack and slash-style combat over the strategic, turn-based or active time combat of games like Final Fantasy. The game's role-playing elements, however, have led to much debate over whether or not the Zelda games should be classified as action role-playing games, a genre on which the series has had a strong influence.[1]
The VS mode involves player(s) racing a track of their choice and also feature customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. VS mode has been changed several times throughout the series. In earlier games, VS mode is exclusive to multiplayer without any computer-controlled racers. Starting from Mario Kart DS, VS mode can be played either single player with CPU racers, or multiplayer with or without CPU racers. A notable exception is Mario Kart 7, where single-player VS races are removed and limited only to multiplayer, but the rules remain the same as in Mario Kart DS and later installments.
Although Sheik is intended to appear masculine, it is unclear whether Princess Zelda physically transforms herself into a male or simply dresses herself to look like one. When Link encounters Princess Ruto in the Water Temple, Ruto explains, "A young man named Sheik rescued me from under the ice". Later, when Link obtains the Water Medallion, Ruto asks, "If you see Sheik, please give him my thanks". Additionally, a Gossip Stone in the Hyrule Castle Grounds says, "They say that contrary to her elegant image, Princess Zelda of Hyrule Castle is, in fact, a tomboy!"
The series has overall enjoyed high critical acclaim, with varying success. Of the main series, six titles have reached a Metacritic score of or above 90: Final Fantasy VI at 91,[29] Final Fantasy VII at 92,[30] Final Fantasy VIII at 90,[31] Final Fantasy IX at 94,[32] Final Fantasy X at 92,[33] and Final Fantasy XII at 92.[34] The only game to reach a Metacritic score below 70 was the original Final Fantasy XIV launch at 49,[35], though the subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, reached a score of 83.[36] The most critically acclaimed release was Final Fantasy IX,[32] while the poorest received by critics was the original Final Fantasy XIV.[35] Spinoffs, likewise, have enjoyed varied critical reception, though lower than that of the main series. Many spinoffs have been well received, such as Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions,[37] Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy[38] and Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call.[39] Many other spinoffs have been poorly received, such as Final Fantasy: All the Bravest,[40] Dirge of Cerberus -Final Fantasy VII-,[41] and Final Fantasy IV: The After Years.[42]
Hit the road with the definitive version of Mario Kart 8 and play anytime, any-where! Race your friends or battle them in a revised battle mode on new and returning battle courses. Play locally in up to 4-player multiplayer in 1080p while playing in TV Mode. Every track from the Wii U version, including DLC, makes a glorious return. Plus, the Inklings appear as all-new guest characters, along with returning favorites, such as King Boo, Dry Bones, and Bowser Jr.!
The rescued princess journeys alongside Kirby until she is attacked and turned into a trophy by Bowser, who uses a swarm of Shadow Bugs to create a clone of the princess. If the princess is Zelda, the clone tries to attack Link and Yoshi, but is intercepted and destroyed by Mario and Kid Icarus hero Pit. Link notices the battle just in time to see what appears to be Zelda's trophy dissolve into nothing, and attacks Mario and Pit in a rage.
At its core, Deluxe is the same great title from Wii U. Racing up a wall is still disorienting fun, and taking the perfect shot with your green shell is satisfying as ever. Even with all the hours I poured into the original Wii U release, I still love the thrill of coming from behind in the final lap to win the race. Of course, some of that is thanks to the questionable rubber-band A.I. that has always been a sticking point of the series, but fans accepted that pitfall as a series mainstay long ago.
As of April 2018, The Legend of Zelda franchise has sold over 80 million copies, with the original The Legend of Zelda being the fourth best-selling NES game of all time.[190][191] The series was ranked as the 64th top game (collectively) by Next Generation in 1996.[192] According to British film magazine Empire, with "the most vividly-realised world and the most varied game-play of any game on any console, Zelda is a solid bet for the best game series ever."[193]
Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
Mario and his friends are back and ready to race once again in Mario Kart Wii! Experience new tracks, enhanced Wii graphics, extraordinary gameplay and much more! Place first in Grand Prix circuits or clear skill-based missions to open up increasingly difficult and thrilling circuits. Players can have multiplayer races on any open courses or battle in arenas. Also included with Mario Kart Wii is the Wii Wheel! Now you can feel like your Mario and steering to avoid obstacles and doing incredible stunts - in the safety of your home of course.
Mega Man X received criticism from some publications as well. Ed Semrad, Danyon Carpenter, and Al Manuel of the EGM review panel all noted that the game may have too low a difficulty level; Semrad disliked the introductory stage and felt that the game was too short as well.[23] Super Play editor Zy Nicholson lowered his review score of the game because he found the levels were neither large nor challenging. "A few elementary tricks like repeating easy sections to recoup energy and weapon power will see you through the harder bits," Nicholson explained. "Within the level you'll also find restart points, extra lives, and no harsh time limit to put pressure on your performance. Couple this with a password system that records your level completion, status and weapon accumulation and you'll see we're not looking at a lasting challenge for the experienced player."[25] Nintendo Power criticized how little the game had changed stating that "the theme remains the same as the Game Boy and NES Mega Man titles."[20] The game's title initially proved a source of some confusion; the gaming media reported that many gamers mistook the "X" for the roman numeral 10.[29]
Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.
Various artbooks and source books have been released for many years in Japan, often including conceptual artwork, interviews with production staff, and background information on the storyline and concepts that are not present within the games themselves. One of the most well-known is the Rockman Perfect Memories sourcebook released in 2002 which first confirmed the presence of an alternate timeline (for Battle Network), as well as exactly where the Legends series fit into the fictional Mega Man universe.
amiibo compatibility – The Wolf Link amiibo from Twilight Princess HD, the Zelda 30th Anniversary series amiibo, and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild series amiibo are all compatible with this game. Tap the Wolf Link amiibo (sold separately) to make Wolf Link appear in the game. Wolf Link will attack enemies on his own and help you find items you’re searching for. Tap a Zelda 30th Anniversary series amiibo to receive helpful in-game items or even a treasure chest!
On to the good, I really love the art style of this game which feels like a cartoon come to life, something which they were moving closer to on 8 and then backtracked from on 9 and 10. The design of everything is just spot on and I really love the creativity on display as well as the fact that this feels like it has an actual story (something the X games aimed for but the core series usually lacked). The controls are smooth and responsive as they should be in any good Mega Man game and this helps to offset the difficulty of some levels (as does the store which has a lot of helpful items to allow the game to be as hard or easy as you choose to make it).
Link's adventures around the kingdom of Hyrule with Princess Zelda are not just restricted to the console at home. In 1989 there was an American animated series which was based on the first games and over time received a cult following. Since then, comics, books and other Zelda fan merch have become well-loved and have helped the series to become so well known. Most notably is the storybook "Hyrule Historia" which was released in 2011 for the series' 25th anniversary and offers a taste of Nintendo's successful story and their fascinating world.
Zelda's alter egos appear to have specialized abilities of their own. In Skyward Sword, it is implied that Zelda and her subsequent incarnations' abilities may be due to her connection to the Goddess Hylia and are potentially divine in nature. In Breath of the Wild, both Kass and Impa refer to the Princess of Hyrule as possessing the blood of the Goddess in their retelling of the legend of Calamity Ganon's defeat ten thousands years ago. Unlike other incarnations, the Breath of the Wild incarnation of Zelda initially has trouble awakening her powers, and as a result develops an interest in science and ancient technology. In Link's memories she is shown using the Sheikah Slate which Link uses 100 years later. She is familiar with Gerudo Town law and uses it to her advantage to allude Link's protection detail as Link a man could not accompany Zelda into Gerudo Town a fact Zelda used to her advantage. However her privileged upbringing means she apparently lacks Link's level of physical fitness and was easily cornered by three Yiga Clan Footsoldiers despite running as fast as she could. Zelda is well read and capable researcher though as shown in one of Link's memories when she fails to realize a Hot-Footed Frog has to be cooked into a Hasty Elixir enhance the consumer's physical abilities due to her excitement over catching one and enthusiasm to study its effects using Link as a test subject due to his high level of physical fitness causing her to try and humorously force Link to consume the uncooked frog despite his visible disgust. However her expertise in studying ancient technology is enough that she can calibrate Divine Beasts and understand their functions and inner workings with Divine Beasts being her primary focus along with the Sheikah Slate. She also realized the significance of the Shrine of Resurrection and ensured it was restored to working order upon discovering it was a medical facility recognizing Ganon must be formidable to necessitate such a facility. Zelda also possess precognition like her previous incarnations as she felt something horrible would happen before the Great Calamity and recognized the increased monster activity was a sign of Ganon's return. She also has some medical knowledge such as the medical applications of various flower species in Hyrule and first aid as she treated Link's minor injuries he received fight monsters in Eldin Canyon. She also apparently has an interest in growing endangered flower species such as Silent Princess which despite her and other people's efforts have failed to grow domestically. Zelda is also shown to be a capable horseback rider who has her own Royal White Stallion. Her concept artwork even depicts her wielding a riding crop. However she requires advice from Link to improve her relationship with her horse as while she is a capable rider she apparently failed to consider its feelings until Link advised her how to soothe her horse and inspired Zelda to empathize with her horse improving their relationship. After awakening her powers, Zelda is shown to be strong enough to seal both herself and Calamity Ganon in Hyrule Castle for 100 years. She also recognized Link would likely lose his memories from the untested Slumber of Restoration thus took steps to help him recover his memories through pictures she left on the Sheikah Slate and a final picture kept by Impa. Interestingly, in both Skyward Sword and Breath of the Wild, Zelda does not age while sealed by her own powers. Yet, in the latter, she appears fully conscious of the outside world while in stasis, likely having the same perception of time as Link. Due to her aging being halted she remains physically seventeen despite being approximately 117 years old as she turned seventeen around the time the Great Calamity began and she kept Ganon sealed for approximately a hundred years making her the oldest known living incarnation of Zelda due to not aging at all for a century.
The first three titles where developed on the 8bit Nintendo Entertainment System while the next three were developed on the 16bit Super Nintendo Entertainment System. These games were two-dimensional and used sprites to depict characters and enemies on screen. The enemies in battle would have more detailed sprites that more closely resembled their artwork, but far fewer animations. The character sprites had several frames of animations, as well as different sprites based on their various statuses or weapons equipped, but were less detailed. Field sprites were less detailed than battle sprites. Though the SNES allowed games to have greater graphics and use higher-quality music with more instrumentation, the games were mostly the same format and similarly basic.

Guinness World Records listed 6 records set by the Mario Kart series, including "First Console Kart Racing Game", "Best Selling Racing Game" and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise". Guinness World Records ranked the original Super Mario Kart number 1 on the list of top 50 console games of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[13]
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