Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
6% when thrown Mega Man summons an orbiting shield of petals. Like the Leaf Shield, it blocks projectiles, but the petals do not dissapear when hit, circulate around the user in a wider area, and deal slightly more damage. In exchange, it has slower startup (both on activation and when fired) and flies a much shorter distance when thrown at a slower speed. It also lasts a shorter duration, which can be both a harm and a help depending on the situation.
Despite the general ineffectiveness in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess, the Hyrulean Soldiers are depicted as willing to serve and defend their Princess, even in the face of death. In fact, one soldier is implied to have died from wounds he received during Ganondorf's attack on Hyrule Castle, though he managed to instruct the young Hero of Time into heading towards the Temple of Time before succumbing to his wounds. In Twilight Princess, the Hyrulean Soldiers are depicted as valiantly defending the Hyrule Castle throne room and Zelda from the Shadow Beasts lead by Zant, though they prove to be no match for the Shadow Beasts. It is also shown that despite their role and willingness to die defending, Zelda generally cares for their well-being as she does for the rest of her people. This is demonstrated by her decision to surrender Hyrule to Zant rather than see them needlessly slaughtered by Zant's minions.

After Hyrule is saved, Zelda uses the Ocarina of Time to send Link back to the past, allowing him to regain his lost seven years. This would however, turn out to be a mistake (like most of her other actions) as Link later lived a regretful life and became the Hero's Shade due Zelda's actions. He does however (as the Hero's Shade), help train his descendant (the Link in Twilight Princess) as well as move on after easing his regrets.
Forward smash Charge Shot 11.5%-19.5% Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.
Down tilt Sliding 8% (clean), 5% (late) Mega Man's signature sliding kick attack; he slides approximately four character lengths forward with a kick. Very little startup with low knockback; the hitbox lasts all the way until the slide is finished, which can hit opponents attempting to roll away. A good surprise move, but only if not overused. The actual sliding ability introduced in Mega Man 3 is a non-damaging maneuver, though said ability becomes weaponized with the Charge Kick, Charge Man's weapon in Mega Man 5.
Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)
This game adds bikes, which I think adds nice diversity and feels very well balanced. The karts tend to be faster with better mini boosts from jumps and corners. The bikes can pop wheelies to get a mini boost on the straight stretches but are more vulnerable to being thrown off balance. My wife likes playing with karts and I like bikes, and I think she usually wins.
Mario Kart Wii was well-received, earning praise for its online capability and the large number of tracks, characters and karts. Joe Sinicki of Blast Magazine comments: "While it still does suffer from some of the problems of the older games, Mario Kart Wii takes the simple and accessible formula set by its predecessors and tweaks it enough to make it feel fresh and fun, creating one of the most entertaining and rewarding gaming experiences in quite some time."[30] Official Nintendo Magazine commented that the Wii Wheel worked very effectively and loved the different multiplayer modes.[31] GameSpot producer Lark Anderson praised the game for being easy to jump into for players of any skill level and stated that motorcycles provide a great alternative to go-karts,[23] and IGN commented "Nintendo has delivered one of the best console Karts in years."[25] Plugged In stated that the racing is easy to do and that "the Grand Prix Cup events and several team battle modes keep things interesting" while Classic Game Room praised the game for its high production value and great replay value. They also liked that the online play was a major strength of the game.

around 37% beams Mega Man fires a Black Hole Bomb forward. After shooting, the bomb will detonate after a set distance, but can be detonated prematurely by pressing the special move button or if the bomb touches another player, causing 1%. Pressing the button again will instantly force the bomb to suck the opponent(s), dealing 1-2%. If anyone touches the black hole, they will be sucked in. A cutscene then occurs where Mega Man summons his other four incarnations: X, MegaMan.EXE, MegaMan Volnutt and Star Force Mega Man. All five proceed to charge their respective Busters and fire energy beams at the opponent, causing around 37% damage. It KOs at mid-high damage percentages, starting at 58%.
Mario Kart has also crossed over into the Fortune Street series, where its DS installment features a playable Mario Circuit based on its Double Dash!! and DS versions, and the Wii follow-up features a Mario Circuit whose design is based on Mario Kart Wii. There are also stages based on Mario Kart in the Mario & Sonic series; for example, Olympic Winter Games features Mario Circuit from Mario Kart Wii, Bowser's Castle from Super Circuit, and Sherbet Land from Mario Kart 64 in its ski cross, ice hockey, and curling dream events respectively. Rainbow Road from Mario Kart 64 is featured in F-Zero X; figurines of Mario, Peach, and Bowser racing in their karts appear as dog toys in Nintendogs; and the Animal Crossing series features Mario Kart items in City Folk and references the series in certain lucky tickets in New Leaf.
The Legend of Zelda was principally inspired by Shigeru Miyamoto's "explorations" as a young boy in the hillsides, forests, and caves surrounding his childhood home in Sonobe, Japan where he ventured into forests with secluded lakes, caves, and rural villages. According to Miyamoto, one of his most memorable experiences was the discovery of a cave entrance in the middle of the woods. After some hesitation, he apprehensively entered the cave, and explored its depths with the aid of a lantern. Miyamoto has referred to the creation of the Zelda games as an attempt to bring to life a "miniature garden" for players to play with in each game of the series.[11]
Associated with the Goddess Nayru and the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda possesses keen insight and good judgment—although this does not always avail her in eschewing capture. Most of Zelda's incarnations are additionally gifted with innate psychic or magical potencies, such as telepathy and precognition. Albeit her gamut of abilities has yet to be revealed, Zelda has demonstrated the ability to cast spells, engender or annul barriers and seals, and shoot a bow. The source of most of these natural mystical powers could be explained by the presence of the Light Force, a power that is passed down through the Royal Family of Hyrule for generations. However Breath of the Wild implies the various incarnations of the Princess are descended from Hylia presumably through the Spirit Maiden from Skyward Sword indicating some of her powers may be divine in nature specifically her sealing powers and ability to communicate with spirits though these latent abilities must be awoken through ritual and devotion to Hylia according to legend though the Zelda of Breath of the Wild struggles despite years of dedicated training and only awakens them through selflessly trying to protect Link.
6% when thrown Mega Man summons an orbiting shield of petals. Like the Leaf Shield, it blocks projectiles, but the petals do not dissapear when hit, circulate around the user in a wider area, and deal slightly more damage. In exchange, it has slower startup (both on activation and when fired) and flies a much shorter distance when thrown at a slower speed. It also lasts a shorter duration, which can be both a harm and a help depending on the situation.
On to the good, I really love the art style of this game which feels like a cartoon come to life, something which they were moving closer to on 8 and then backtracked from on 9 and 10. The design of everything is just spot on and I really love the creativity on display as well as the fact that this feels like it has an actual story (something the X games aimed for but the core series usually lacked). The controls are smooth and responsive as they should be in any good Mega Man game and this helps to offset the difficulty of some levels (as does the store which has a lot of helpful items to allow the game to be as hard or easy as you choose to make it).
Mario Kart Wii's Battle mode is similar to that seen in previous installments in which players drive around an enclosed arena and attack each other using items. The players are divided into two teams, red and blue, and teammates cannot harm each other with their items. There are two variants of Battle mode available: Balloon Battle and Coin Runners. In Balloon Battle, each player's kart has three attached balloons. A player gains a point each time they pop or steal a balloon belonging to an opposing team player, but loses a point each time they lose all balloons. In Coin Runners, the players collect coins scattered throughout the arena and attack opposing team members to make them drop coins. The team that has accumulated the most points or coins total when the three-minute time limit expires wins.[7]
Soon, the police came to arrest Dr. Light. Meanwhile, Mega Man went after the Robot Masters and, after he defeated a few of them, discovered that they were scheduled to be decommissioned and sent to the junkyard because they had reached the expiration date assigned to them by the government. Once the final robot had been taken down, Mega Man brought back his Memory Circuit Board to Auto for investigation. As it turned out, Dr. Wily had reprogrammed the robots, who were scheduled for demolition, to rise up against their human masters rather than be destroyed.
During a city battle against Bass, Mega Man is called away to investigate an island uncharted by any maps. After defeating a hermit crab-like robot, he finds Dr. Wily, who reveals that the island was his base before absconding with an orb of strange purple energy. Although unable to stop Wily's escape, Mega Man finds a badly damaged robot in a crater and takes it back to Dr. Light's lab. While the robot is brought in for repairs, Dr. Light informs Mega Man that Dr. Wily is at it again, with four brand-new Robot Masters attacking locations all over the globe.
When Nintendo revealed the GameCube on August 24, 2000, the day before Nintendo's SpaceWorld 2000 exposition,[79] a software demonstration showed a realistically styled real-time duel between Ganondorf and Link. Fans and the media speculated that the battle might be from a Zelda game in development.[80] At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda game, later released as The Wind Waker in December 2002. Due to poor reception, nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages".[81][82] The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.
Initially, the player assumes control as Zelda, although it is possible to start a round as Sheik by holding down the A button following selection of a stage until the round begins. Zelda is somewhat slow but is rather graceful and agile, and her special attacks, if they connect, are extremely powerful—boosted by magic, if the sparkles and flashes of light are any indication. Her aerial movements and dodging skill, as well as her attacks' high priority and strong impact, make her an ideal counter-defensive character. She is very much built for defensive attacking, but her moves leave her very open if timed incorrectly, and if attacked, her gracefulness can work against her. She has a light frame and is easily sent flying.
Ganon, also known as Ganondorf in his humanoid form, is the main antagonist and the final boss in the majority of The Legend of Zelda games. In the series, Ganondorf is the leader of a race of desert brigands called the Gerudo, which consists entirely of female warriors save for one man born every one hundred years. He is significantly taller than other human NPCs, but his looks vary between games, often taking the form of a monstrous anthropomorphic boar. His specific motives vary from game to game, but most often his plans include him kidnapping Princess Zelda and planning to achieve domination of Hyrule and presumably the world beyond it. To this end, he seeks the Triforce, a powerful magical relic. He often possesses a portion of the Triforce called the Triforce of Power, which gives him great strength. However, it is often not enough to accomplish his ends, leading him to hunt the remaining Triforce pieces. Unlike Link, Zelda, and most other recurring characters, he is actually the same person in every game, with the exception of Four Swords Adventures, where he is a reincarnation of the original. In each game the battles with him are different and he fights using different styles. The game Skyward Sword indicates that Ganon is a reincarnation of an evil deity known as Demise.
In Skyward Sword, Zelda is shown to have a father known as Gaepora, whom she seems reasonably close to. The two casually interacted with one another when discussing Link's success at the ceremonial race, to which Zelda voiced her worry. In response, Gaepora reminded Zelda of the importance of a rider and Loftwing`s bond with one another, noting Link`s powerful bond with his Crimson Loftwing. He would also continue on to tease Zelda, jokingly referring her as jealous. Somewhat annoyed at her father`s words, Zelda further voices her worries to him. Seeing Zelda slightly agitated, Gaepora notes her change in behavior when concerning Link. Later on, when Zelda goes missing from a mysterious tornado, Gaepora shows great concern for his daughter and asks Link to save her.
In The Wind Waker, Zelda's (or more precisely Tetra's) relations consist of a deceased mother who previously led her band of pirates, and an ancient ancestor who often takes the form of a talking boat. The pirates of Tetra's crew deeply respect their captain and act as a surrogate family for her. It was also confirmed in Spirit Tracks that Tetra is the grandmother of Zelda in the Japanese script. She was the one who taught Zelda about the Lokomos. It is also hinted in the Fallen Hero Timeline that the Seven Sages in Ocarina of Time are the ancestors of the maidens and sages in A Link Between Worlds. Another significant relationship shown is with King Daltus, father of Zelda in The Minish Cap. When Zelda is turned to stone, he is desperate to find a way to save her. The quest to do so requires Link to communicate with the spirit of another royal ancestor, King Gustaf.
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.
×