Perfect game for all ages and anyone that comes over the house can pick it up really easily. My three year old got tired of the other games I had for the wii and I bought this one. He learned how to drive on his second try. He's still not coordinated enough to do everything well but he can complete a race, pick up items and use them. He's used a lot of the tracks and has a preference for some and even found a couple of short cuts on his own that I use now. Mom, dad, and son can play together and have fun since the races are short and it's easy enough to switch out games, cars, and characters. There are a good amount of characters to choose from. I do wish there were a couple more options on game types but this game is still really fun and it's my son's new favorite.
The story begins with Zelda awakening from a recurring nightmare, which she and Impa believe to be a sign of troubled times approaching. While visiting the training barracks of Hyrule Castle, she sees a particularly talented recruit that seems to be different from the others - however, her attention is quickly directed to a massive army of monsters approaching the castle. Zelda personally leads the defense of her castle, soon joined by Impa and Link, the recruit from earlier who had just been revealed as the reincarnation of the legendary hero by his possession of the Triforce of Courage. With the battle seemingly under control, Zelda returned to Hyrule Castle to coordinate her forces, only to be ambushed by Wizzro while her army was distracted by King Dodongo.
The Mario Kart series has been referenced twice in the Paper Mario role-playing game series. Luigi references it in an "adventure" of his which he recounts between chapters of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where in the third of his stories, he states that he visited a location called "Circuit Break Island" where kart races are organized every day. Later, in Paper Mario: Color Splash, once all six Big Paint Stars have been retrieved, Luigi drives his kart on Rainbow Road to transport Mario to Bowser's castle to defeat him and restore peace to Prism Island; when Bowser (who has been transformed by black paint) is reverted to normal upon his defeat, he asks Mario if they have a kart race scheduled. Additionally, several stages based on Mario Kart have appeared in the Super Smash Bros. series: Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS features a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, as well as reusing the Mario Circuit stage from Brawl. Although not actually shown in the first Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the franchise (which at that time had been composed of just Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64) was alluded to in a promotional ad for the game in Nintendo Power, where it mentioned that Nintendo's famous cast had previously "raced go-karts" when announcing their new role in the fighting ring.
The waiting comes into play again here with the hunts, which will be the majority of the filler busywork. Like 80% of the problem I have with the hunts in particular would be gone if they'd just let us be able to accept multiple hunts, but no - get one, finish one, report back to a tipster, repeat ad infinitum, which is especially fun with the few hunts that require special weather conditions. And of course, you can only do a slow jog in major cities to get back to a tipster (god I hate you Lestallum, why does the guy have to be way in the furthest corner of the bazaar), which means even MORE waiting. FFXII did multiple hunts just fine over a decade ago. What excuse does FFXV have?
Neutral attack Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 1% (Mega/Rock Buster) Mega Man fires up to three shots from his Mega Buster (AKA Rock Buster in Japanese), which have limited range and do less knockback at longer range. He lacks a proper forward tilt and neutral air due to his ability to shoot while walking forwards or jumping, though the moves do have minute differences. The Mega Buster itself does slightly more damage when combined up close with the shots fired.
I bought this for my kids because of the great memory I had playing Zelda 2 when I was a kid. That was one of the most challenging and rewarding games I had ever finished. I've not played video games for over 25 years until getting the switch and BOTW. I am amazed at how much gaming has improved and how much I've missed out! I like that this game is not all about fighting and is not too violent and gruesome. The game is fun for all ages and even my youngest 5 year old boy enjoys playing it, although he mostly just explores the villages and experiment with cooking. The biggest problem with this game is that it is so addictive that we'll play it all day and don't want to do anything else. So my wife is not too happy.
Once upon a time, eight bosses and a handful of increasingly vicious Dr. Wily stages were all that a player might have needed to wile away day after day, scribbling down passwords and carefully memorizing the position of each precious E Tank. (Filed mentally right next to their grid map of Hyrule, or the locations of all the hidden 1-UP mushrooms in Super Mario Bros. 1.) But with modern conveniences like between-level saving and the ability to toss plentiful in-game currency at your supply of extra lives and mid-level recharges, those replayable, compulsive elements have been steadily whittled down. And even with its not-infrequent highs, Mega Man 11 doesn’t have anything more substantial to offer in their place, instead relying on a basic skeleton that can’t help but creak as its 30th anniversary arrives. Mega Man 9 (and, to a lesser extent, 10) overcame these pitfalls with a combination of laser-guided nostalgia and rock-solid platforming precision, but 10 years (and any number of more ambitious retro platformers—cough, Shovel Knight, cough) later, and even 11’s biggest swings for the unorthodox leave it feeling like little more than a trifle. In a medium that evolves by the day, 11 is content just to be a pretty good Mega Man game—for better and for worse.

The game is maybe 10-15% story missions, and the rest mostly filler sidequests. The story missions are fairly enjoyable, and the dungeons especially are probably the high points for the game in general (actual plot happening, interesting/funny chatter, unique enemies, often very beautiful scenery - the one in the Vesperwood is my favorite so far). It's a shame that there aren't more important sidequests. Previous entries in the FF series had more benefits from sidequests than just extra gil/consumables or a decent new weapon. There was more lore, more character-building.. but the majority of these sidequests just feel like busywork.
In 2005, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, a theatrical CGI film, and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII, a non-canon OVA,[48] were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was animated by Visual Works, which helped the company create CG sequences for the games.[49] The film, unlike The Spirits Within, gained mixed to positive reviews from critics[50][51][52] and has become a commercial success.[53] Last Order, on the other hand, was released in Japan in a special DVD bundle package with Advent Children. Last Order sold out quickly[54] and was positively received by Western critics,[55][56] though fan reaction was mixed over changes to established story scenes.[57]

^ "Video interview with FINAL FANTASY XII Directors". FINAL FANTASY XII Collector's Edition Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd. October 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2011. Hiroshi Minagawa: In the course of development, Jun Akiyama and Daisuke Watanabe came up with many ideas but ultimately we had to abandon many of them. I'd heard their original ideas and I wish we could have included them all. Once we began development and many of the systems were in place, the team had many progressive ideas. It was the most enjoyable part of the project. But as we approached the project's end, I had to point out features we had to drop in order for the game to be finished. Which is unfortunate, since I'm sure people would have enjoyed the game that much more if we could have left all our original ideas in.
Our best Ocarina of Time sage tournament continues with the first match-up of the Semi-Finals. After all the craziness of Round 1, Zelda and Impa face off. Zelda Vs. Impa Zelda, the princess of Hyrule, makes her long-awaited debut in the tournament. We meet young Zelda as a child in OoT, learning of her prophecy regarding the kingdom of Hyrule, the Sacred Realm, and Ganondorf’s threat. Her and Link quickly concoct a plot to nab the three Spiritual Stones and…
You see I now attempted Acid Man's level on the easier difficulty and there are various points where a fan blows you through spike filled tubes. Any Megaman fan would know the golden rule,"touch those spikes and die!", but because the difficulty was turned down so low, by hitting the spikes, I only lost a little bit of energy and got awarded with a trophy called "Everything proof." It almost made me feel like I was getting a "Ha Ha! You can't play the game on the regular difficulty!" jab by Capcom. Honestly, I feel like Capcom has now made the Megaman games more "extreme" for millennials. By the time I got to Acid Man, near the end of the battle, I was just mashing the fire button to hurry up and kill him rather than even trying to stay with any sort of pattern.
The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]
Games in The Legend of Zelda series frequently feature in-game musical instruments, particularly in musical puzzles, which are widespread.[2] Often, instruments trigger game events: for example, the recorder in The Legend of Zelda can reveal secret areas, as well as warp Link to the Dungeon entrances. This warping with music feature has also been used in A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening. In Ocarina of Time, playing instruments is a core part of the game, with the player needing to play the instrument through the use of the game controller to succeed.[3] Ocarina of Time is "[one of the] first contemporary non-dance title[s] to feature music-making as part of its gameplay",[4] using music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to utilise songs to progress in the game[5] – a game mechanic that is also present in Majora's Mask.[6]
Zelda was featured in three games made by a third party for the Phillips CD-i system. In Link: The Faces of Evil (1993), she was kidnapped by Ganon and had to be rescued. In Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (1993) and Zelda's Adventure (1994), Princess Zelda was the main protagonist, as the plot in both games involves Link's kidnapping. The games are generally criticized by fans, although they are noteworthy as the first time Zelda has been a playable character in any game.
Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)

Ah ha ha, now this is funny. Apparently Mega Man X Legacy Collection is going to revert the Mega Man X5 Maverick names back to the ones used in the original game’s manual rather than the Guns N’ Roses names. But actually, if the preview videos are any guide, they’re taking it one step further and they’re actually translating the stray Japanese words into English equivalents like I did on the Game Hints page. For example, Spiral Pegacion officially becomes Spiral Pegasus (which is what he should have been named all along—in my humble opinion). I don’t yet have a list of all eight names but I’m sure that will be forthcoming because we’re getting really close to release day.
She often wears jewelry such as ornate earrings (which in some games feature a Triforce design), as well as a royal gown of white, pink, lavender, or another pale color (red in The Adventure of Link), usually bearing the Royal Family's crest. Zelda has also been depicted in casual attire, such as in Skyward Sword, or in a blue shirt with Hylian embroideries as the Champions commander in Breath of the Wild.

The Crystal-theme can be said to be the overarching theme of the series, as a traditional Final Fantasy plot involves an antagonistic force trying to make use of the Crystals' power with the player power in opposition, sometimes chosen to wield the Crystal's power to enact their will as the Warriors of Light. Some games subvert this theme, such as Final Fantasy XII—where the Crystals are called nethicite—and the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy series with its various types of Crystal, showing that the power of the Crystals is not necessarily something that mankind should pursue despite its might.


Some other manga series that have not been localized outside Japan include a 12-volume Rockman X adaptation by Yoshihiro Iwamoto, over 15 Classic and X adaptations by Shigeto Ikehara, a light-hearted adaptation of Rockman Zero by Hideto Kajima, a slapstick adaptation of Shooting Star Rockman by Masaya Itagaki, another Battle Network adaptation by Jun Keijima and Miho Asada called Rockman EXE Battle Story, and a short series of slapstick Battle Network and Star Force-themed adaptations by Takumi Kawano.
Growing up in the halls of Hyrule Castle, young Princess Zelda, referred to by the Great Deku Tree as the Princess of Destiny,[4] was growing concerned with one of her father's associates, the Gerudo king Ganondorf, and a vision of his treachery did not help matters.[64] Expressing her concerns with her guardian and nursemaid Impa, she continued to watch the Gerudo despite her inability to do anything about him. This changed when a young Kokiri boy named Link snuck into her garden courtyard.[65]
Because of the limitations of the LCD screen, there is no elaborate ending sequence. When the eighth dragon has been defeated, Princess Zelda walks out of her prison and right up to Link (just as she does in The Adventure of Link) as if to embrace him, but the animation ends just before they meet, leaving the end result up to the player's imagination.
Following Ganon's defeat and while Princess Zelda and Link had left to return the Master Sword to its pedestal, the battle weary Hyrulean Soldiers lead by Impa were confronted by the remnants of Ganondorf's army of monsters which took advantage of the situation to attack the ruins of Hyrule Castle. However despite her absence and their exhaustion, the soldiers valiantly defended the kingdom, though Impa later had them retreat in order to rest while she and the newly arrived Linkle engaged the monsters, though they vowed to return once they had regained their strength. True to their word, the soldiers returned to the battlefield and assisted Impa and Linkle by confronting the lesser monsters, allowing Impa and Linkle focused on defeating Dark King Dodongo. The Hyrulean Forces eventually prevailed over the Monster Forces just as their princess was return to the castle with Link.

Nintendo argued that the MariCar name was "intended to be mistaken for or confused with" Mario Kart, citing games commonly known by abbreviations in Japan, such as Pokémon (for Pocket Monsters) and Sumabura (Super Smash Bros.). In January 2017, the Japan Patent Office dismissed the objection, ruling that MariCar was not widely recognized as an abbreviation of Mario Kart.[24]

The game won multiple Wii-specific awards from IGN in its 2008 video game awards, including Best Racing Game[46] and Best Online Multiplayer Game.[47] IGN also nominated it for Best Family Game for the Wii.[48] The game was ranked ninth in Nintendo Power's "Best of the Decade."[49] It also won the award for "Favorite Video Game" at the 2010 Kids' Choice Awards.[50] Guinness World Records has awarded Mario Kart Wii with a record for being the best-selling racing video game of all time.[51]
The game is maybe 10-15% story missions, and the rest mostly filler sidequests. The story missions are fairly enjoyable, and the dungeons especially are probably the high points for the game in general (actual plot happening, interesting/funny chatter, unique enemies, often very beautiful scenery - the one in the Vesperwood is my favorite so far). It's a shame that there aren't more important sidequests. Previous entries in the FF series had more benefits from sidequests than just extra gil/consumables or a decent new weapon. There was more lore, more character-building.. but the majority of these sidequests just feel like busywork.
In the Hyrule Warriors Legends, Linkle and her fellow Villagers are the only civilians of Hyrule to appear. After Villagers receive word that Hyrule Castle has been attacked and that Princess Zelda is leading the fight against the invaders, Linkle under the impression that she is the legendary hero, leaves her village to aid Princess Zelda and the struggling Hyrulean Forces. Though she got lost on her way to the castle, Linkle would later join Twili Midna in rescuing Princess Zelda after she went to the Palace of Twilight to stop the flow of Dark Twilight Magic that threated to consume the entire land of Hyrule. Though she managed to rescue Princess Zelda, after seeing Twili Midna's decision to sacrifice her true form to stop the dark magic, Linkle decided to continue on her original journey to Hyrule Castle, rather than joining up with Zelda and Midna. Ultimately this turned out to be the right decision as Linkle after at the ruins of Hyrule Castle shortly after Ganon's defeat, discovering the remnants of his army attacking the battle weary Hyrulean Forces and Impa who stayed behind to defend castle while Zelda and Link returned the Master Sword to its pedestal. Joining in the fight, Linkle and Impa manage to lead the Hyrulean Forces to victory and defened the kingdom in Zelda and Link's absence.

Mega Man's personality seems to stem from his creator, Dr. Light, whose intention may have been to design Rock based on his own interpretation of a real boy as if it were his very own son. Rock, who would later be upgraded into the super fighting robot known as Mega Man, demonstrates a wide range of emotions, similar to that of a prepubescent boy, not typical of other robots, thus making him unique.

At the story's start, she takes Link, whom she has been childhood friends with since they were infants, to the Picori Festival in Hyrule Town. During the ceremony following the Picori Festival Tournament, she is turned into stone by the winner, Vaati. Vaati is an evil mage searching for a legendary Light Force, and knowing Zelda has mystical powers of her own, he wants to keep her out of the way. Later, discovering that her power is, in fact, the Light Force, Vaati invades Hyrule Castle and abducts the petrified Princess, planning to sacrifice her and become a god. Link, after reforging the Four Sword, attacks the castle and faces off against Vaati. Upon defeating the evil mage, Link uses the power of the Four Sword to restore Zelda, who tells Link she had seen him on his adventure as if through a dream, to normal. Zelda then uses the power of the Magic Cap and Light Force to return Hyrule to its natural state. The overflowing power of life causes the Minish Cap to break apart. Ezlo then states that Zelda's kindness as well as the power of the Minish Cap (or Light Force, in the Japanese version of the game) created a miracle. With the time to part nearing, Zelda and Link see Ezlo off as he returns to the Minish World.
×