More details have been released regarding the new Mega Man TV show that is being produced. I am a little surprised to read that apparently they aren’t even going to try to stick to the plot of the games at all, but are simply taking the “Mega Man” name and a few miscellaneous inspirations from the series and going off on their own. The character design looks like a mix between X and Star Force—which, speaking of Star Force, that’s probably a good comparison regarding the chosen plot direction. There’s nothing inherently wrong with this, of course, and it means the plots will be new and not quite as predictable. And it’s not like we don’t already have enough different Mega Men to completely befuddle any newcomers to the series as it is...just look at the selector image above.

Following Ganon's defeat, she assists Link in returning the Master Sword to its Sacred Pedestal to restore the seal on Ganon's Soul. When the darkness from Ganon's soul contained in the Pedestal leaks out to prevent Link from returning the sword, Zelda helps Link push the Sword into the pedestal, sealing away Ganon once again. The two then leave the Temple of the Sacred Sword together. Linkie's decision to follow her own path proves fortunate as Linkie later comes to Impa and the Hyrulean Forces aid while Link and Zelda are busy returning the Master Sword to its pedestal. After Linkie and Impa end up saving Hyrule in Link and Zelda's absence, Link and Zelda can be seen walking in Hyrule Field towards Hyrule Castle after restoring the seal.
While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.
Some time later, Dr. Wily claims to have changed and teams up with Dr. Light to create a giant peacekeeping robot called Gamma. However, the new Robot Masters created to mine the Energy Elements needed for Gamma's construction have gone out of control. Mega Man goes after them, meeting his brother, Proto Man (under the alias Break Man in this game, until the ending) along the way. Mega Man soon retrieves the crystals, but returns to discover that Dr. Wily has stolen Gamma and plans on using it to take over the world.
Master Mode: In Master Mode, enemies gradually regain health, so take them out as quickly as possible. All enemies are also powered up by one level. For example, Red Bokoblins in Normal Mode are now Blue Bokoblins. Enemies can also have higher maximum levels than they would in Normal Mode. Look up, and you may also find enemies and treasure chests in the sky!
The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original SNES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" original courses and 16 "retro" tracks drawn from previous titles, spread across four cups each. The four "nitro" cups ― the Mushroom Cup, Flower Cup, Star Cup, and Special Cup ― have been recurring cups throughout the entire series, while the "retro" cups from the more recent installments are the Shell Cup, Banana Cup, Leaf Cup, and Lightning Cup. As the player progresses through the cups, each is ostensibly more difficult than the one before it. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, namely Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.
Now we come to 11 where the series has had its first major overhaul with the addition of the gear mechanics. This takes some adjusting too as you'll quickly find you NEED to use the speed gear to get past many obstacles. However, this leads to one problem I have with the game which is that at times, it feels more akin to a puzzle platformer than a standard Mega Man game.
When Link awakens from his seven-year slumber in the Sacred Realm, he encounters Zelda, disguised as a young man of about Link's age named Sheik, who claims to be a survivor of the Sheikah Tribe. Thereafter, Sheik gives Link clues to the locations of the various temples, and teaches him special songs enabling him to warp to specific points near these temples.
Princess Zelda was set to appear in the unreleased game Mystical Seed of Courage. In the game, she was to be the one responsible for managing the four seasons of Hyrule, in a role similar to Din's in Oracle of Seasons. She would be kidnapped by Ganon, which, along with the disappearance of the Rod of Seasons, would cause Hyrule's seasons to go out of control.
Neutral aerial Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 2% (Mega Buster) Behaves identically to Mega Man's neutral attack, except Mega Man fires while jumping or falling in the air much like in his original games. The move has a sweetspot on the Mega Buster that has high base knockback and can serve as a surprise KO option when edge-guarding. Due to Mega Man's effective aerial movement, his neutral attack can be used as a very effective "wall" to deny approaches.
After a five-year hiatus, the series made the transition to 3D with Ocarina of Time for the Nintendo 64, which was released in November 1998. This game, initially known as Zelda 64, retains the core gameplay of the previous 2D games, and was very successful commercially and critically. It is considered by many critics and gamers to be the best video game of all time, and ranks highly on IGN and EGM's "greatest games of all time" lists, as well as scoring perfect scores in several video game publications.[62] In February 2006, it was ranked by Nintendo Power as the best game released for a Nintendo console.[63] The game was originally developed for the poorly selling, Japanese-only Nintendo 64DD, but was ported to cartridge format when the 64DD hardware was delayed.[64] A new gameplay mechanic, lock-on targeting (called "Z-targeting" as that is the controller button used), is used in the game, which focuses the camera on a nearby target and alters the player's actions relative to that target.[65] Such mechanics allow precise sword fighting in a 3D space. The game heavily uses context-sensitive button play, which enabled the player to control various actions with Link using only one button on the Nintendo 64's game pad. Each action was handled slightly differently but all used the 'A' button to perform. For instance, standing next to a block and pressing 'A' made Link grab it (enabling him to push/pull it), but moving forwards into a block and pressing 'A' allowed Link to climb the block. The 'B' button was used only as an attack button. The game featured the first appearance of Link's horse, Epona, allowing Link to travel quickly across land and fire arrows from horseback. Those who preordered the game received a gold-coloured cartridge in a limited edition box with a golden plastic card affixed, reading "Collector's Edition".[66] In some stores that had this "Collector's Edition" quickly sell out, a small and rare Zelda pin was given instead. It is the sword and shield emblem with "Zelda" written on it. Very few of them are known to remain.

Where Mega Man 11 deviates in its gameplay is with a new system called the Double Gear. In a flashback to Dr. Wily and Mega Man creator Dr. Light’s younger days, we learn that Wily helped develop the Double Gear system, believing it to be the next evolution for robotkind. Light, on the other hand, believed that robot progress lay in artificial intelligence, a disagreement that led to their decadeslong rift.


The good news is Mega Man 11 is pretty good. It's everything I expected from a Mega Man game. It does play it relatively safe, however. There is no risk to the formula or design, but this is necessary because the goal needs to be to get Mega Man back on track. That being said, just because it plays it safe doesn't mean it has nothing to offer. The level designs are extremely good (with Block Man's stage being a near perfect tutorial on how to make use of the game's new Double Gear system) and the levels are fairly lengthy and challenging to keep you going. It makes the game inviting, but Mega Man hasn't lost its trademark difficulty. The game is hard. If the clever level designs don't stump you every now and then, some of the bosses will.
Though she is never actually shown using them in core Zelda games, she can use the spells Nayru's Love, Farore's Wind, and Din's Fire in the spin-off Hyrule Warriors game and the non-canon Super Smash Bros. series. Additionally Zelda is also a capable military commander in Hyrule Warriors and can manipulate light-based magic energy to create balls of light or a triangular field of light that causes light energy to erupt from the ground.
Some other manga series that have not been localized outside Japan include a 12-volume Rockman X adaptation by Yoshihiro Iwamoto, over 15 Classic and X adaptations by Shigeto Ikehara, a light-hearted adaptation of Rockman Zero by Hideto Kajima, a slapstick adaptation of Shooting Star Rockman by Masaya Itagaki, another Battle Network adaptation by Jun Keijima and Miho Asada called Rockman EXE Battle Story, and a short series of slapstick Battle Network and Star Force-themed adaptations by Takumi Kawano.
Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game. 
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