Spirit Tracks features several moments that can be interpreted romantically. Early in the game during the Graduation Ceremony, Zelda walks into the room in front of Link, who is bowing down respectfully. Link then looks up and gasps, blushing at her in amazement. He is then scolded by Chancellor Cole for raising his head without permission. Later, when Zelda's spirit is separated from her body following the first encounter with Chancellor Cole and Byrne, Link is the only one who can see her besides the Lokomos, demonstrating a clear and strong bond between himself and the Princess. After Zelda and Link defeat Byrne in the Tower of Spirits, Byrne, disbelieving, comments that he was beaten by two mortals. Zelda, while still possessing a Phantom, says that when she and Link combine their strength, no one can defeat them. Link turns to her, surprised. The background turns white and Zelda's Lullaby plays as they both laugh and high-five, gazing at each other all the while.

The VS mode involves player(s) racing a track of their choice and also feature customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. VS mode has been changed several times throughout the series. In earlier games, VS mode is exclusive to multiplayer without any computer-controlled racers. Starting from Mario Kart DS, VS mode can be played either single player with CPU racers, or multiplayer with or without CPU racers. A notable exception is Mario Kart 7, where single-player VS races are removed and limited only to multiplayer, but the rules remain the same as in Mario Kart DS and later installments.


Mega Man gains various additional options from his custom moves. Shadow Blade and Ice Slasher are good for immobilizing opponents and are less susceptible to being used against Mega Man himself. Hyper Bomb and Danger Wrap are harder to land, but deal much more damage and knockback. Tornado Hold has more offensive value due to it dealing damage and granting Mega Man new combo potential. Plant Barrier does not last as long as the default Leaf Shield, but can deal and absorb more damage. Skull Barrier lacks a hitbox when circling Mega Man and deals less damage when thrown, but it reflects projectiles when orbiting and cannot be destroyed, giving it a more defensive value than both Leaf Shield and Plant Barrier lack.
Zelda is the daughter of the King of Hyrule, and eventually the Seventh Sage and the holder of the Triforce of Wisdom. She is also the leader of the Sages. The heir to the Royal Family, Zelda is of the Hylian race with blonde hair and blue eyes. She begins the game as a young girl about 10-12 years old, who is gifted with psychic abilities. In a dream of symbolic importance, she senses Ganondorf's treachery and predicts Link's arrival before either occurs. When Link meets her for the first time in Hyrule Castle's courtyard, she sends him on a quest to collect the three Spiritual Stones and protect the Triforce from Ganondorf. When Ganondorf attacks Hyrule Castle, Zelda and her nursemaid, Impa, flee the castle on horseback.
In Grand Prix, one player is required to race against eleven (formerly seven) computer-controlled characters in a "cup," a series of four races (five in Super Mario Kart). Mario Kart games typically have four recurring difficulty levels: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and an extra "Mirror" mode (where tracks are inverted left-to-right); starting in Mario Kart 8, a fifth difficulty level, 200cc, was added. As the player progresses through the cups, the courses become more difficult, and as the difficulty level increases, the vehicles go faster. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race. In earlier games, if a player finishes in a lower position, they must replay the race and may not proceed until a higher placing is achieved. The racer with the highest number of points after all races have been completed wins a trophy: bronze for third place, silver for second, and gold for first. Grand Prix is also playable in multiplayer mode for up to four players, though this does not affect the rest of the gameplay rules. Grand Prix is known as Mario Kart GP in the first three games.
Available for the console's standard retail price of £279.99, this Nintendo Switch console deal comes with a copy of the ultra-popular (and ultra-amazing) Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, the moustachioed plumber's latest karting adventure. The game is included as a digital download code meaning you can simply hook your console up to the internet when it arrives, pop in the code, and you'll have a shiny copy of the game waiting for you. Lovely.
Mega Man appears in several manga from the series, including, but not limited to, the manga Mega Man Megamix, Rockman Remix, Mega Man Gigamix, Rockman, Rockman World, Rockman: Yomigaeru Blues, Rockman 8, Rockman & Forte, Rockman 10 -Extra F-, Rockman 4Koma Dai Koushin, Rockman Battle & Chase, and Rock'n Game Boy. Mega Man also appears in the Mega Man 2 novel and in the comics Mega Man (from Dreamwave Productions), Mega Man (from Archie Comics), and Novas Aventuras de Megaman.
Princess Zelda returns as a playable character in the fifth installment of Super Smash Bros. Her appearance is now based on her design from A Link Between Worlds, since Masahiro Sakurai and the developers felt her Breath of the Wild incarnation was more suited to research than combat. In the Japanese trailer, however, it lists the basis of her appearance as being Triforce of the Gods, or A Link to the Past. Her move set is largely the same as previous games with some adjustments. However, Zelda's Final Smash has changed from the Light Arrow to the Triforce of Wisdom, which will trap opponents inside the titular Triforce piece for huge damage.
The series portrays an overt romantic relationship between the two protagonists. Link is always begging Zelda for a kiss; however, even when she agrees to indulge him, it never occurs. They are interrupted by monsters, or Spryte, or any number of unfortunate circumstances. It is directly revealed that Zelda loves Link in one episode, and there is no doubt of their romantic relationship in this series. Thirteen of these cartoons were produced before the cancellation of The Super Mario Bros. Super Show. Princess Zelda was voiced by Cynthia Preston in the cartoon.
Two animated tie-ins for Final Fantasy XV were announced at the Uncovered Final Fantasy XV fan and press event, forming part of a larger multimedia project dubbed the Final Fantasy XV Universe. Brotherhood: Final Fantasy XV is a series of five 10-to-20-minute-long episodes developed by A-1 Pictures and Square Enix detailing the backstories of the main cast. Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV, a CGI movie set for release prior to the game in Summer 2016, is set during the game's opening and follows new and secondary characters.[58][59][60][61]
Each setting often features some form of magic (sometimes spelled magick), though it often differs between the different lores. In many settings, magic is the power of the world's Crystals. In Final Fantasy VI magic has become a rarity, with many resorting to magitek (magic technology). In Final Fantasy VII, magic is a product of the Lifestream and can be used via Materia, though scientists have stated that "magic" is an unfitting term for a force of nature. In Final Fantasy XII, magick is provided by the mysterious substance known as Mist that seeps from the inside of the planet.
For the first few installments a key plot point was the Crystals. Each world would feature four, each representing the four elements, and without them the world would deteriorate. The antagonists often begin by destroying or stealing these Crystals for power, and the party would fail to prevent them and be forced to foil their grander scheme later. This plot was abandoned in Final Fantasy VI, and while the games would still feature Crystals, they often did not have the same importance.
Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.
The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.
Mega Man does have some notable flaws, however: While Mega Man has a good amount of attacks with good knockback, the majority of his kill moves are considered situational, difficult to set up, or and/or are easy to punish. As such, he has a more difficult time killing than other characters and it requires good reads to successfully finish off opponents. Characters that have a move that either reflects projectiles or can nullify them (such as Fox or Lady Palutena) can also prove to be an annoyance for him due to his over-reliance on projectiles to combo opponents and bait reactions and it can render his Forward Smash (one of his better kill moves) unreliable, though this can be worked around by firing the Mega Buster twice at a time, and most reflectors are punishable if baited and he can still grab them. Although Mega Man can effectively zone opponents at medium ranges with the Mega Buster, most of his other moves are fairly laggy or gimmicky and his only reliable tool in close range is his grab, and as such faster characters (such as Greninja or Captain Falcon) can bypass his zoning more easily and put work on him in closer ranges and due to his above average weight and falling speed, Mega Man is somewhat easy for these characters to combo once they get in, assuming that they have any combo potential.

In Skyward Sword, Zelda is shown to have a father known as Gaepora, whom she seems reasonably close to. The two casually interacted with one another when discussing Link's success at the ceremonial race, to which Zelda voiced her worry. In response, Gaepora reminded Zelda of the importance of a rider and Loftwing`s bond with one another, noting Link`s powerful bond with his Crimson Loftwing. He would also continue on to tease Zelda, jokingly referring her as jealous. Somewhat annoyed at her father`s words, Zelda further voices her worries to him. Seeing Zelda slightly agitated, Gaepora notes her change in behavior when concerning Link. Later on, when Zelda goes missing from a mysterious tornado, Gaepora shows great concern for his daughter and asks Link to save her.

While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.
Princess Zelda,(TLoZ | TAoL | ALttP | OoT | OoS | OoA | TWW | FS | FSA | TMC | TP | ST | ALBW | BotW)[13][14] sometimes shortened to just Zelda,(SS | BotW | HW | SSBU)[15] is the eponymous name commonly given to the women born into the Royal Family of Hyrule in The Legend of Zelda series.[16] With the exception of Link's Awakening, Majora's Mask, and Tri Force Heroes, an incarnation of Zelda or one of her alter egos has always been one of the central characters in the series.
Just as there are multiple Links, there are multiple Zeldas throughout the series. Generally close in age to her respective Link, Zelda is most often portrayed as a child, but has been portrayed as a teenager or young adult on five occasions: in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
Final Fantasy[a] is a science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The series has also branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching out in other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.

The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[215] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[216] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[217] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the series,[218] and BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[219] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[220]
The music was composed by Asuka Ohta and Ryo Nagamatsu; who both used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games alongside original material. A 46-track official soundtrack was released in December 2011 as a Club Nintendo reward in Japan.[18] The speaker on the Wii Remote is frequently used during gameplay, as sound effects like crashes and warning signals are emitting from it. During the extensive testing of the different Wii Wheel prototypes, the developers decided to have the voice actors playing the game during recording sessions.[14]
Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.

The original Super Mario Kart has been listed among the greatest games ever made by a number of organizations. IGN, in listing it as the fifteenth-best game ever, called it "the original karting masterpiece."[16] It has also been credited with creating the kart racing subgenre of video gaming, as many developers have attempted to replicate its success, including Sega with Sonic Drift, Ubisoft with Street Racer, Konami with Konami Krazy Racers, Sony Computer Entertainment with Crash Team Racing, etc. Response to all these competing kart racers has been mixed: GameSpot stated that they tended to be bad,[17] and 1UP.com said that their producers tried to improve upon the Mario Kart formula without success.[18]
Another less popular theory among fans is that Link and Zelda are related by blood, either as siblings or more distantly. Even though rumors to this effect started with the infamous "Save the Princess... Zelda is your... ... ..." line from A Link to the Past (later reported as a mistranslation), the theory generally revolves around the Link and Zelda from Ocarina of Time.

Other games in the series deviate further from the typical formula. Final Fantasy XII has player characters learn License Points (a variation of the ability points system) to spend on a License Board to purchase "licenses" to wield different equipment, use different spells and boost stats, with total freedom. In the International Zodiac Job System re-release the License Boards are based on jobs. In Final Fantasy X characters learn abilities based on a Sphere Grid that begins linearly but the player can eventually branch the grid out further, and potentially max all stats with various items usable to alter and improve Sphere Grid growth. Another example featuring items for growing skills is Final Fantasy VIII where magic spells are collected into an inventory similar to items, and acquired through refine or draw abilities, with other abilities learned via ability points from the character's equipped Guardian Forces.
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