Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]

Ich bin damit einverstanden, den EMP-Newsletter zu erhalten und willige ein, dass die E.M.P. Merchandising Handelsgesellschaft mbH meine personenbezogenen Daten verarbeitet um mich individuell und regelmäßig über ihr Angebot zu informieren. Die Verarbeitung meiner personenbezogenen Daten erfolgt entsprechend den Bestimmungen in der Datenschutzerklärung. Ich kann meine Einwilligung gegenüber der E.M.P. Merchandising Handelsgesellschaft mbH jederzeit widerrufen.
Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
The series has received criticism for many other aspects. Many have found the menu-based combat system and its use of random encounters to be a turnoff, or an outdated annoyance,[54][55] with IGN stating the the use of random encounters "need[ed] to change".[56] The series' minigames have been divisive and often come under fire as weaker aspects[57][58][59] (although minigames have received praise in other regard[60]). Finally, many direct sequels in the series have been poorly received and believed to be worse than the original titles.[61][62][63]
This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
Though all incarnations of Mega Man feature unique stories, settings, and characters, they share several common features. All main Mega Man games released prior to 1997 are side-scrolling action platformers. The player character must fight through the levels using Mega Man's "Mega Buster"—a cannon attached to his arm—to shoot the robotic enemies inhabiting his environment. When Mega Man was released in 1987, the characteristic that made it revolutionary was the choice given to the player of which robot master to attempt first. After defeating a Robot Master—the boss of a level—Mega Man gains the ability to use that Robot Master's special weapon. Each Robot Master is representative of a specific element or object, with such bosses as Fire Man, Ice Man, Guts, Griffith, and Elec Man. The weapons Mega Man gains share the theme of the defeated boss. After defeating all of the Robot Masters, Mega Man travels to a multi-stage fortress to confront Dr. Wily, the person responsible for the robotic enemies' destructive acts. In the fortress, Mega Man fights past new bosses, clones of the game's Robot Masters, and Wily, who is usually in a large multi-phase war machine.
In 2011, to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the series, an art book was published exclusively in Japan under the name Hyrule Historia by Shogakukan. It contains concept art from the series's conception to the release of Skyward Sword in 2011 and multiple essays about the production of the games, as well as an overarching timeline of the series. It also includes a prequel manga to Skyward Sword by Zelda manga duo Akira Himekawa. The book received an international release by publisher Dark Horse Comics on January 29, 2013;[208] it took the number one spot on Amazon's sales chart, taking the spot away from E. L. James's 50 Shades of Grey trilogy.[209] Dark Horse released The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts, a follow-up art book to Hyrule Historia containing additional artwork and interviews,[210][211] in North America on February 21, 2017, and in Europe on February 23, 2017.[212]
Skyward Sword shook up the series in other ways, too. It removed Zelda's traditional large overworld, and instead used smaller, separate areas designed to be played multiple times, albeit with radical changes for each visit. And then there was Fi, the magical spirit which lived in Link's famous Master Sword. Many fans compared her chattiness to that of Ocarina of Time's Navi - and not in a good way.
Super Mario Kart was the first non-platforming game to feature multiple playable characters from the Mario franchise, leading the way for not only its various sequels but also the many other spin-offs that the Mario characters have appeared in, including both sporting games (those relating to tennis, golf, baseball, and soccer) and non-sporting games (Mario Party among other series). The genre-spanning nature of the Mario franchise that was sparked off by the success of Super Mario Kart has been described as key to Mario's success and longevity, keeping fans interested despite the infrequency of the traditional Mario platforming games.[18] Mario Kart and all of the franchise's other spin-off series have helped it rise to its present status as the best-selling video game franchise of all time.
I bought this game as a replacement for a Wii game my daughter wanted but I couldn't find. I never expected that I would LOVE it. I rarely play the Wii. It's pretty much a race game. There are several races with all kinds of courses, which go from easy to difficult. You get to choose your character, then the kind of vehicle you want to race in. You can choose to go for a test drive or race against a ghost (either of one of the wii developers or yourself). I've never played previous versions of this game, but they have the Gamecube version at my kids dentist's office and the wii edition of this game is about 1000 percent better in terms of graphics. While racing against other players, you can pick up different obstacles, like a banana, oil slick or bomb to throw at your opponents. Of course, they throw these things at you too, so you have to avoid them. You can also drive over ramps to give you a boost or pick up a tool to give you super speed or shield you from bombs, etc. I've played it with my kids and other adults and everybody always has a blast. I do like the wheel, but I can play the game fine without it, too. All in all it's a lot of fun, worth the extra money, and a great gift for someone who has a wii but you don't know what kind of game they want. I think this would be perfect for anybody, young and old.

The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][116] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][94][116] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[197][198] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[199] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[200] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[201] Grandia,[202] and The Elder Scrolls.[200] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[203] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[204] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[117] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[205]


Mega Man X received criticism from some publications as well. Ed Semrad, Danyon Carpenter, and Al Manuel of the EGM review panel all noted that the game may have too low a difficulty level; Semrad disliked the introductory stage and felt that the game was too short as well.[23] Super Play editor Zy Nicholson lowered his review score of the game because he found the levels were neither large nor challenging. "A few elementary tricks like repeating easy sections to recoup energy and weapon power will see you through the harder bits," Nicholson explained. "Within the level you'll also find restart points, extra lives, and no harsh time limit to put pressure on your performance. Couple this with a password system that records your level completion, status and weapon accumulation and you'll see we're not looking at a lasting challenge for the experienced player."[25] Nintendo Power criticized how little the game had changed stating that "the theme remains the same as the Game Boy and NES Mega Man titles."[20] The game's title initially proved a source of some confusion; the gaming media reported that many gamers mistook the "X" for the roman numeral 10.[29]
When Link was appointed as Zelda's personal knight by King Rhoam after defeating a Guardian that went haywire during an experiment with a simple Pot Lid, her insecurities in regards to her inability to awaken her powers came to the surface, resulting in her lashing out at him out of jealousy due to his apparent success in fulfilling his destiny as he could already wield the Master Sword. Additionally she mistook Link's silence as a sign that he likely hated her. She grew tired of him following her around seeing him as a constant reminder of her own failure. However Link refused to follow her orders as the King assigned him to protect her which was his sworn duty as Captain of her Imperial Guard detail. Zelda even resorted to abusing Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail though ended up falling asleep while calibrating Vah Naboris and Urbosa informed Link of her where abouts. Urbosa would also foil an assassinate attempt by disguised Yiga Clan members though Zelda convinced her to spare their lives. However, after Link saved Zelda's life when the Yiga Clan tried to assassinate her again near Kara Kara Bazaar, she realized that it was wrong of her to take her frustrations out on him, and befriended him thereafter. She was surprised to discover how gluttonous Link was and discovered his silence was due to his burden as chosen hero despite his skills he still had doubts but shouldered the burden of his destiny causing Zelda to see Link in an entirely new light. She came to respect and admire his dedication to his knightly training. The two bonded over the burdens they carried though Zelda became worried by Link's tendency to be reckless even noting there is a thin line between courage and recklessness.
A possible indication of a blood relation between the two in Ocarina of Time is their physical resemblance: they both have blonde hair, blue eyes, and similar facial features. They also have similarly shaped heads. Graphics limitations could be responsible for some of this similarity, however. Certain dialogue could also be perceived as implying a blood relation: the ghost Sharp comments that Link reminds him of Zelda, and that Link "may have some connection with the Royal Family".[4] Link's connection to the Royal Family is highlighted throughout the game, with Link often playing Zelda's Lullaby to verify it. The fact that Impa agrees to teach an outsider a song only Royal Family members are allowed to know could also be interpreted as a hint at Link's blood relation to Hyrule's Royal Family. [5]

Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]
Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]

In The Wind Waker, when Link travels to Hyrule Castle beneath the Great Sea, there is a portrait of the Princess of Hyrule (around the age of Tetra) from before the Great Flood hanging on the wall of the castle. In the portrait, the princess is surrounded by several characters, all of which have a counterpart to a member of Tetra's Pirate Crew. It is known that during the Great Flood, she took a piece of the Triforce of Wisdom which had been broken in two by her father and fled to the mountaintops with several of her servants.[155]

Take part in an epic and ever-changing FINAL FANTASY as you adventure and explore with friends from around the world. The complete edition is perfect for newcomers as it includes the award-winning FINAL FANTASY XIV: A Realm Reborn and the Heavensward and Stormblood expansion packs! Join others from around the world and start your own FINAL FANTASY adventure today!
Mega Man Battle Network, a series primarily on the Game Boy Advance, began in 2001 as a way for the Mega Man games to branch out into the role-playing video game market and to celebrate MegaMan's 15th anniversary. This series features a Net Navi called MegaMan.EXE. Net Navis act as virtual assistants to Operators, such as the protagonist Lan, an elementary school student and future hero who uses his Net Navi to help battle computer viruses and other Internet-based threats. The game combines elements from collectible card games to create a unique fast-paced battle system. An anime series, MegaMan NT Warrior, was also produced, ending with 209 episodes and a 50-minute film adaptation. Mega Man Network Transmission, the only entry in the series released on a home console rather than a handheld, takes place chronologically between the first two Battle Network games, although it was released between the third and fourth. It is also different from other games in the Battle Network universe in that its game play reminds strongly of the Classic series.

In April 2008, Miyamoto stated that "the Zelda team is forming again to work on new games".[87] Miyamoto clarified in July that the Zelda team had been working on a new Zelda game for the Wii.[88] In January 2010, Nintendo Executive Satoru Iwata stated that the game would be coming out at some time in 2010, and confirmed that the game would make use of the Wii's MotionPlus feature, which had been announced too late to be integrated into the Twilight Princess Wii release. The game's subtitle was announced at E3 in 2010 as Skyward Sword, but its release was delayed to 2011.[89] The game, the earliest in the Legend of Zelda timeline, reveals the origins of Hyrule, Ganon and many elements featured in previous games. It was released on November 20, 2011; the first run included a 25th Anniversary CD of fully orchestrated music from various Zelda games, including Skyward Sword.


According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21]
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