Worried about the seal on Vaati, Zelda goes with six other mystical maidens to check on the Sanctuary of the Four Sword, and Link accompanies her. Something goes horribly wrong, however, and a dark shadowy Link attacks them. Link is forced to draw the Four Sword to fight Shadow Link, and Vaati escapes. The girls are abducted, and the Links come to their rescue. Zelda helps them defeat Shadow Link, and after Vaati is dispatched, the five quickly flee the collapsing Tower of Winds. Finally, the Links face Ganon, who is behind the catastrophe, and Zelda helps them deliver the final blow.

Which is kind of a shame. Because while the ability to slow down time is legitimately transformative—especially once you’ve picked up a few upgrades, allowing Mega Man to move at his normal speed while the rest of the world crawls along in digital molasses—it doesn’t change the fact that “biggest alterations to the Mega Man formula” hasn’t been a very competitive field in decades. A little extra bite might have knocked something interesting loose here, a different tone for a team that’s grown too comfortable playing a single note. On a fundamental level, these are games about learning and exploiting patterns, and despite a few flashes of brilliance, Capcom seems just as trapped in one of its own. The times have changed. Gaming has changed. Mega Man hasn’t.
As pointed out by others, Zelda has many attributes that attracts allies. While not always a stable relationship from the start, she has gained many good friends throughout various games. Most of her friends deeply respect her as the princess of Hyrule and do not doubt her judgment. Her kindness is enough to turn even some of her enemies into allies.
Up tilt Mega/Rock Upper 17% (clean), 12% (mid), 8% (late) A quick rising uppercut. Based on the move of the same name from Mega Man 2: The Power Fighters, Marvel vs. Capcom and Street Fighter X Tekken, which is itself a tribute to the Shoryuken from the Street Fighter series. For a tilt, it has incredible power (in fact being stronger than his uncharged up smash), with the sweetspot having as much power as some smash attacks and being able to reliably KO medium-light characters under 90%. It has little starting lag but very high ending lag and little horizontal range. It also pushes Mega Man forward a slight distance; if Mega Man uses the move near a ledge, he will fall off and grab the ledge.
Since Mario Kart 64, all player-characters have been grouped into one of three distinct weight classifications. Smaller characters, labeled as "lightweights," have high acceleration but low top speeds, and lose a minimal amount of speed when off-road but are easily knocked aside by heavier opponents. Medium-sized characters, or "middleweights," have an equal balance of weight, top speed, and acceleration, and lose a moderate amount of speed when off-road. The largest characters, labeled as "heavyweights," can easily knock aside most opposing racers, have high top speeds but poor acceleration, and lose great amounts of speed when off-road.

Stories have been worked on as a collaborative effort from multiple developers with concepts having drawn inspiration from multiple sources. In the early games, Sakaguchi drew inspiration from anime film maker Hayao Miyazaki, and staples such as chocobos and airships originally derived from them.[12] Furthermore, many have noted similarities between the series and Star Wars, present in references such as Biggs and Wedge and in recurring plot points such as an "Empire".[13] The series contains many darker themes of tragedy and loss, many inspired by the developers' own experiences. While developing Final Fantasy VII, the series creator Sakaguchi's mother died, which caused him to drastically reform the game's story to be about coping with loss.[14]
Mega Man gains various additional options from his custom moves. Shadow Blade and Ice Slasher are good for immobilizing opponents and are less susceptible to being used against Mega Man himself. Hyper Bomb and Danger Wrap are harder to land, but deal much more damage and knockback. Tornado Hold has more offensive value due to it dealing damage and granting Mega Man new combo potential. Plant Barrier does not last as long as the default Leaf Shield, but can deal and absorb more damage. Skull Barrier lacks a hitbox when circling Mega Man and deals less damage when thrown, but it reflects projectiles when orbiting and cannot be destroyed, giving it a more defensive value than both Leaf Shield and Plant Barrier lack.
The Crystal-theme can be said to be the overarching theme of the series, as a traditional Final Fantasy plot involves an antagonistic force trying to make use of the Crystals' power with the player power in opposition, sometimes chosen to wield the Crystal's power to enact their will as the Warriors of Light. Some games subvert this theme, such as Final Fantasy XII—where the Crystals are called nethicite—and the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy series with its various types of Crystal, showing that the power of the Crystals is not necessarily something that mankind should pursue despite its might.
Several Mario Kart-related items appear in the Super Smash Bros. series, with Super Smash Bros. Brawl in particular featuring a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS,[10] Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS featuring a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U featuring a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, along with the returning Mario Circuit stage from Brawl.
Rather similar to the Seven Maidens in terms to their relationship with Zelda, the Seven Sages from Ocarina of Time seem to see her as their leader. Zelda as Sheik urged Link to save them to the point of sometimes getting directly involved. It is unknown whether they knew her true identity as Zelda especially due to Ruto's claim about her. It is unknown what the Seven Sages from A Link Between Worlds think of Zelda as they did not interact with her.
I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.
Jump up ↑ "I find your protests inelegant. Not to mention irrelevant. I wish to possess your beauty, Princess Zelda of Hyrule, not all these ugly words of yours! Oh, you are going to make for a spectacular painting, my dear! [...] Haha! My lovely masterpiece! How utterly scrumptious! Dare I say, it's my best work ever!" — Yuga (A Link Between Worlds)
A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]
Zelda Month has come and gone much too quickly. But for those who might’ve missed it, PeanutButterGamer (PBG) released his final video for the month just over a week ago. PGB, who started Zelda Month in 2011, puts a twist on his traditional videos with a Zelda product review. In the video, he takes some of the most interesting Zelda items from eBay and, in usual PBG spirit, reviews them with a kooky flair and comical hijinks. Give it a…

Mario Kart Wii was well-received, earning praise for its online capability and the large number of tracks, characters and karts. Joe Sinicki of Blast Magazine comments: "While it still does suffer from some of the problems of the older games, Mario Kart Wii takes the simple and accessible formula set by its predecessors and tweaks it enough to make it feel fresh and fun, creating one of the most entertaining and rewarding gaming experiences in quite some time."[30] Official Nintendo Magazine commented that the Wii Wheel worked very effectively and loved the different multiplayer modes.[31] GameSpot producer Lark Anderson praised the game for being easy to jump into for players of any skill level and stated that motorcycles provide a great alternative to go-karts,[23] and IGN commented "Nintendo has delivered one of the best console Karts in years."[25] Plugged In stated that the racing is easy to do and that "the Grand Prix Cup events and several team battle modes keep things interesting" while Classic Game Room praised the game for its high production value and great replay value. They also liked that the online play was a major strength of the game.


Even after his crushing defeat at the hands of Mega Man, Dr. Wily was already planning his next scheme. If he could get his hands on the time machine (named Time Skimmer in the American manual) that was being developed at the Time-Space Research Laboratory (named Chronos Institute in the American manual), he thought he just might be able to change the past.

As they continued to flee, they were cornered in West Necluda near Fort Hateno. Link wielding the Master Sword defeated countless Guardians until both he and the sword became battle worn and exhausted. With the remaining corrupted Guardians closing in, Zelda begged Link to run and save himself. However, he refused, instead staying to try and protect Zelda. When a Guardian began to target lock onto Link, Zelda positioned herself in front of him in an act of self-sacrifice, raising her right hand up to the Guardian. In that moment, her powers awakened, and all of the Guardians in the surrounding area were shut down by a blast of magical light which purged Ganon's influence from them. After this, however, Zelda heard a thump and turned around to find Link collapsed on the ground badly injured on the verge of death. Hopeless despite her success Zelda crying besides Link in total despair. Suddenly Master Sword glows as its dormant spirit then begans to speak to Zelda, telling her that Link could still be saved, reminding Zelda of the Shrine of Resurrection. Determined to save his life, Zelda insisted that Link be taken when they were found by two Sheikah warriors and later instructed Purah and Robbie to carry Link to the ancient medical as soon as possible. The Master Sword's spirit however convinced Zelda she still had a role to play.

No level is the same, and their motifs match the Robot Master who rules that domain. You can choose the order in which you tackle stages, and each Robot Master gives Mega Man a new power upon being defeated, opening up new strategies for subsequent levels. There’s lots of fun to be had with trial and error, figuring out which boss to face first and which powers will defeat the next Robot Master faster. Sometimes it’s as easy as Bubble Man’s power (water) defeating Heat Man (fire) but some get more obscure, especially in the later Mega Man games.
Following Ganon's defeat and while Princess Zelda and Link had left to return the Master Sword to its pedestal, the battle weary Hyrulean Soldiers lead by Impa were confronted by the remnants of Ganondorf's army of monsters which took advantage of the situation to attack the ruins of Hyrule Castle. However despite her absence and their exhaustion, the soldiers valiantly defended the kingdom, though Impa later had them retreat in order to rest while she and the newly arrived Linkle engaged the monsters, though they vowed to return once they had regained their strength. True to their word, the soldiers returned to the battlefield and assisted Impa and Linkle by confronting the lesser monsters, allowing Impa and Linkle focused on defeating Dark King Dodongo. The Hyrulean Forces eventually prevailed over the Monster Forces just as their princess was return to the castle with Link.

In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]
Titles in the series have generally received praise for their storylines, characters, settings, music, battle elements and graphics.[43][44][25] Many other aspects in particular have received praise, such as the job system, a series staple,[45][46] with GameSpot stating it is "hard to say enough good things" about it, referring to the the "exciting variety" it offers to the gameplay.[47] Another popular feature is the self-referential nature of many of the games and inclusions of allusions to previous games, with recurring features such as chocobos, moogles and Gilgamesh among others, being well received as nods to make fans feel at home.[48][49][50] The series has also been praised for its gameplay variety and innovation between installments to prevent the gameplay from going stale.[51][52][53]
Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.
Several spin-off series have emerged over the past few years, each one continuing the Mega Man mythos in some unique way, including but not limited to Mega Man X, Mega Man Legends, and Mega Man Battle Network. A resulting animated series was also produced originally in the United States as well as a number of toys, comics, and collectibles available both in and outside of Japan.
The Legend of Zelda games feature a mixture of puzzles, action, adventure/battle gameplay, and exploration. These elements have remained constant throughout the series, but with refinements and additions featured in each new game. Later games in the series also include stealth gameplay, where the player must avoid enemies while proceeding through a level, as well as racing elements. Although the games can be beaten with a minimal amount of exploration and side quests, the player is frequently rewarded with helpful items or increased abilities for solving puzzles or exploring hidden areas. Some items are consistent and appear many times throughout the series (such as bombs and bomb flowers, which can be used both as weapons and to open blocked or hidden doorways; boomerangs, which can kill or paralyze enemies; keys for locked doors; magic swords, shields, and bows and arrows), while others are unique to a single game. Though the games contain many role-playing elements (Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is the only one to include an experience system), they emphasize straightforward hack and slash-style combat over the strategic, turn-based or active time combat of games like Final Fantasy. The game's role-playing elements, however, have led to much debate over whether or not the Zelda games should be classified as action role-playing games, a genre on which the series has had a strong influence.[1]
In several games, Zelda has a nursemaid named Impa, a faithful servant who is heavily hinted to be largely responsible for raising her and cultivating her abilities. In The Legend of Zelda, Impa is her most trusted servant, the one whom she entrusts with the task of finding a hero to defeat Ganon. In The Adventure of Link, it is Impa who brings Link to the North Castle and recounts the story of the ancient curse on the sleeping Zelda.

Mega Man (ロックマン, Rockman) is a newcomer in Super Smash Bros. 4. He was announced at Nintendo's E3 2013 Direct Conference presentation for the game, becoming the first-revealed of the six third-party characters in the game along with SEGA's Sonic and Bayonetta, Bandai Namco's Pac-Man, fellow Capcom character Ryu, and Square Enix's Cloud. He does not widely use hand-to-hand combat, instead relying on the large arsenal of ranged weaponry he has amassed by defeating boss characters in his own games. His sound effects are reused from the vast number of retro Mega Man games he has appeared in.
around 37% beams Mega Man fires a Black Hole Bomb forward. After shooting, the bomb will detonate after a set distance, but can be detonated prematurely by pressing the special move button or if the bomb touches another player, causing 1%. Pressing the button again will instantly force the bomb to suck the opponent(s), dealing 1-2%. If anyone touches the black hole, they will be sucked in. A cutscene then occurs where Mega Man summons his other four incarnations: X, MegaMan.EXE, MegaMan Volnutt and Star Force Mega Man. All five proceed to charge their respective Busters and fire energy beams at the opponent, causing around 37% damage. It KOs at mid-high damage percentages, starting at 58%.

Mario Kart DS features dual-screen play and introduces online multiplayer (via Wi-Fi) & retro battle courses. Introduces Shy Guy (exclusive to DS Download Play), Dry Bones, and R.O.B. as playable characters. DS was also the first Mario Kart game to feature retro tracks from all previous versions of the game. It is, as of 2017, the only entry in the series to feature mission mode. It also introduces two new items: the Blooper and Bullet Bill.

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