The central protagonist of The Legend of Zelda series, Link is the name of various young men who characteristically wear a green tunic and a pointed cap, and are the bearers of the Triforce of Courage. In most games, the player can give Link a different name before the start of the adventure, and he will be referred by that given name throughout by the non-player characters (NPCs). The various Links each have a special title, such as "Hero of Time", "Hero of the Winds" or "Hero chosen by the gods". Like many silent protagonists in video games, Link does not speak, only producing grunts, yells, or similar sounds. Despite the player not seeing the dialogue, it is referenced second-hand by in-game characters, showing that he is not, in fact, mute. Link is shown as a silent protagonist so that the audience is able to have their own thoughts as to how their Link would answer the characters instead of him having scripted responses.
The Mario Kart series has spawned a range of merchandise over the years. Scalextric produced a slot car racer set based on Mario Kart DS, including figures based on Mario, Donkey Kong, Wario, and Luigi. A line of radio-controlled karts has also appeared based on the series, featuring Mario, Donkey Kong, and Yoshi, controlled by Game Boy Advance-shaped controllers. Mario Kart 64 has been promoted with figures of Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Wario, and Bowser made by Toybiz; and another figurine line featuring all eight player-characters available only in Japan. There is also a line of "Sound Drops" inspired by Mario Kart Wii featuring eight of the game's sound effects, and a land-line telephone featuring Mario holding a lightning bolt while seated in his kart.
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide. 

Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
Dr. Wily appears during the World Robot Expo and manages to reprogram some of the Robot Masters that were on display. Although Dr. Light and Mega Man were also in attendance, Wily failed to reprogram Mega Man. Thus, Dr. Light sends Mega Man out to stop Wily before he can use his newly reprogrammed robots to wreak havoc across the globe. Mega Man manages to defeat the first four Robot Masters and make his way to Wily's fortress, where he encounters a new Mega Man Killer named Ballade, and although he defeats him, Ballade promptly leaves, opening the way up to where four more Robot Masters lay in waiting.
Jump up ↑ "I set out for Goron City today to make some adjustments to Divine Beast Vah Rudania. I still recall feeling his eyes on me as I walked ahead. The feeling stayed with me so long, I grew anxious and weary. It is the same feeling I've felt before in his company... And still, not a word passed his lips. I never know what he's thinking! It makes my imagination run wild, guessing at what he is thinking but will not say." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)
In The Wind Waker, Tetra (as Princess Zelda) briefly wields the Master Sword that had been dropped by Link, making her one of the few people besides Link to be shown wielding the Blade of Evil's Bane. Her ability to wield it proves that Tetra (despite being a pirate) possesses a heart untainted by evil, as it has often been stated that evil beings are incapable of touching and or wielding it. However as she wields it only briefly before returning it to Link, it is unknown if Tetra could wield it as effectively as the various incarnations of the Hero. Being a pirate, Tetra is implied to possess some sword fighting skills and carries a short dagger-like blade, which she is shown wielding in promotional artwork. In the spin-off Hyrule Warriors series, she wields cutlasses (along with magically infused pistols) and is even capable of performing the Spin Attack.

From the beginning Uematsu was given creative freedom, though the series' creator Hironobu Sakaguchi would request specific set-pieces to fit themes, and early on there were specific notes Uematsu was unable to use due to hardware limitations.[18] From Final Fantasy IV onwards, he had more freedom of instrumentation. For "One-Winged Angel", the Final Fantasy VII final boss theme and the series' first vocalized theme, Uematsu combined both rock and orchestral influences having had no prior training in orchestra conduction.[18]
A previous incarnation of the Princess of Hyrule is mentioned by Kass and Impa in the legend of the creation of the Divine Beasts and Guardians. In this tale, the princess, her knight, and four unnamed Champions successfully utilized the ancient Sheikah technology and were able to defeat Calamity Ganon ten thousand years prior to the events of Breath of the Wild. Both the current and Princess of Hyrule from ten thousand years ago are referred to as the "Goddess-blood Princess". This is likely a reference to the suggestion the Royal Family of Hyrule is descended from Hylia's mortal reincarnation the Spirit Maiden Zelda from Skyward Sword.

While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.
The waiting comes into play again here with the hunts, which will be the majority of the filler busywork. Like 80% of the problem I have with the hunts in particular would be gone if they'd just let us be able to accept multiple hunts, but no - get one, finish one, report back to a tipster, repeat ad infinitum, which is especially fun with the few hunts that require special weather conditions. And of course, you can only do a slow jog in major cities to get back to a tipster (god I hate you Lestallum, why does the guy have to be way in the furthest corner of the bazaar), which means even MORE waiting. FFXII did multiple hunts just fine over a decade ago. What excuse does FFXV have?
This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
You see I now attempted Acid Man's level on the easier difficulty and there are various points where a fan blows you through spike filled tubes. Any Megaman fan would know the golden rule,"touch those spikes and die!", but because the difficulty was turned down so low, by hitting the spikes, I only lost a little bit of energy and got awarded with a trophy called "Everything proof." It almost made me feel like I was getting a "Ha Ha! You can't play the game on the regular difficulty!" jab by Capcom. Honestly, I feel like Capcom has now made the Megaman games more "extreme" for millennials. By the time I got to Acid Man, near the end of the battle, I was just mashing the fire button to hurry up and kill him rather than even trying to stay with any sort of pattern.

In Sonic Lost World, a DLC stage based on The Legend of Zelda series was released in March 2014, named "The Legend of Zelda Zone". While built around the core gameplay mechanics of Sonic Lost World, "The Legend of Zelda Zone" incorporates some elements from the Zelda series, including a heart-based vitality meter, rupee collection, and a miniature dungeon to explore.[116]
The next two games, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, were released simultaneously for the Game Boy Color, and interact using passwords[73] or a Game Link Cable.[74] After one game has been completed, the player is given a password that allows the other game to be played as a sequel.[73] They were developed by Flagship in conjunction with Nintendo, with supervision from Miyamoto. After the team experimented with porting the original The Legend of Zelda to the Game Boy Color, they decided to make an original trilogy[75] to be called the "Triforce Series".[76] When the password system linking the three games proved too troublesome, the concept was reduced to two games at Miyamoto's suggestion.[77] These two games became Oracle of Ages, which is more puzzle-based, and Oracle of Seasons, which is more action-oriented.[78]
Link's adventures around the kingdom of Hyrule with Princess Zelda are not just restricted to the console at home. In 1989 there was an American animated series which was based on the first games and over time received a cult following. Since then, comics, books and other Zelda fan merch have become well-loved and have helped the series to become so well known. Most notably is the storybook "Hyrule Historia" which was released in 2011 for the series' 25th anniversary and offers a taste of Nintendo's successful story and their fascinating world.

In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]

…which is nothing compared to how online play is like. I will admit that I have seen some pretty nasty moves that other players have pulled like people in lower places firing behind them a lot even though they are clearly in range of the racers ahead of them. Other instances where racers shoot each other a lot can end up giving first place an even bigger lead due to constant sabotage. I have ran into some instances where I was hit more times than the AI does in a single race. You could be doing so well and be on the final stretch when a blue shell appears and blows you up, then end up getting hit by other players so many times, that you end up in last place.

Side special Default Crash Bomber 1% (loop), 4% (last) Fires a grappling bomb attached to a drill that latches on to any surface or fighter it touches, before exploding a few seconds later. Much like a Gooey Bomb, it can be transferred between players before it detonates but has a shorter timer and the explosion can be safely shielded. The bomb can travel a good distance until it disappears. Can be used to bait a shield grab, or shot against the stage while recovering to deny edgeguarding or extend Mega Man's own recovery. The move is based on Crash Man's weapon in Mega Man 2.

Categories: CharactersSagesCompanionsHeroesHyliansHyruleansPrincess ZeldaRoyaltySkyloftiansCharacters in The Legend of ZeldaCharacters in The Adventure of LinkCharacters in A Link to the PastCharacters in Ocarina of TimeCharacters in Ocarina of Time 3DCharacters in Majora's MaskCharacters in Majora's Mask 3DCharacters in Oracle of SeasonsCharacters in Oracle of AgesCharacters in Four SwordsCharacters in The Wind WakerCharacters in The Wind Waker HDCharacters in Four Swords AdventuresCharacters in The Minish CapCharacters in Twilight PrincessCharacters in Twilight Princess HDCharacters in Spirit TracksCharacters in Skyward SwordCharacters in A Link Between WorldsCharacters in Breath of the WildCharacters in The Faces of EvilCharacters in The Wand of GamelonCharacters in Zelda's AdventureCharacters in BS The Legend of ZeldaCharacters in Ancient Stone TabletsCharacters in Super Smash Bros. MeleeCharacters in Super Smash Bros. BrawlCharacters in Hyrule WarriorsBosses in Hyrule WarriorsCharacters in Hyrule Warriors LegendsBosses in Hyrule Warriors LegendsCharacters in Hyrule Warriors: Definitive EditionBosses in Hyrule Warriors: Definitive EditionCharacters in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DSCharacters in Super Smash Bros. for Wii UCharacters in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
He also appears in Nova's ending as part of the new Mega Nova Corps along with Proto Man, Beat, Roll and Zero as well as Thor's ending which was redone to include him along with Ryu and Morrigan. His other appearance in the game is that of a card in the "Heroes and Heralds" mode, as an "S Rank" card who's primary ability is halving the time used to charge attacks for characters with his secondary ability increasing the chance to gain rare cards of characters belonging to Capcom.
In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
Down special Default Leaf Shield 2% (circling), 3.8% (thrown) Mega Man summons leaf-shaped units that electromagnetically orbit around him. The leaves block projectiles, and can be fired forwards by pressing an attack button to land multiple hits, or used to deal additional damage to a grabbed enemy. The move is based on Wood Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.

Four years later, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past returned to the top-down view (under a 3/4 perspective), and added the concept of an alternate dimension, the Dark World. The game was released for the Super NES on November 21, 1991.[56] It was later re-released for the Game Boy Advance on March 14, 2003, in North America, on a cartridge with Four Swords,[56] the first multiplayer Zelda, and then through Nintendo's Virtual Console service on January 22, 2007. In addition, both this game (unchanged, except for being converted into a downloadable format)[58] and an exclusive "loosely based" sequel (which used the same game engine) called BS Zelda no Densetsu Inishie no Sekiban[59] were released on the Satellaview in Japan on March 2, 1997, and March 30, 1997, respectively.
Character growth determines how player characters learn new abilities and boost their stats. Unlike battle systems, character growth systems are less consistent throughout the series, and players must internalize the systems to make the correct decisions. The only consistent character growth mechanic used in the series has been the level based system where characters raise their level through experience points earned in battle to improve stats and sometimes learn new abilities. Even this system has been excluded from some games, such as in Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII, where only ability points are accumulated from battles that can be expended for both better stats and new skills.
Like the Super Mario series, the Mario Kart series has achieved successful sales with over 100 million copies sold in total.[20] Super Mario Kart has sold 8.76 million copies and is the fourth best-selling game on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System console.[14] Mario Kart 64 is the second-bestselling game for the Nintendo 64 (behind Super Mario 64), selling a total of 9.87 million copies.[14]Mario Kart: Double Dash has sold 6.96 million copies.[14] It is the second best-selling game on the GameCube (next to Super Smash Bros. Melee). Mario Kart Wii has achieved highly successful numbers, selling a total of 37.10 million copies.[16] It is the best-selling installment in the series and is the second best-selling game for the Wii (next to Wii Sports).[16] Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U, has shipped 1.2 million copies in North America and Europe combined on its first few days since launch, which was the console's fastest-selling game until the record was beaten by Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.[21][22] It sold a total of 8.42 million copies and is the Wii U's best-selling game.[18] In contrast, the enhanced port for the Nintendo Switch system, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, has sold 459,000 units in the United States in one day of its launch, making it the fastest-selling game in the series to date.[23] Deluxe sold a total of 10.35 million copies worldwide, outperforming the original Wii U version, and is the second-bestselling Nintendo Switch game of all time (behind Super Mario Odyssey).[19] Both versions sold a combined total of 18.77 million copies

As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.
×