Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
When transitioning to the 32bit era, Square began to develop games in 3D. A tech demo in 1995 using Final Fantasy VI characters, Final Fantasy VI: The Interactive CG Game, showed the kind of technology they were using. Square opted to develop on the PlayStation, as opposed to the Nintendo 64 as originally intended, due to its use of disc storage instead of the more limited cartridges,[20] and the game still required three discs of storage. Final Fantasy VII was the most expensive game at the time to develop, costing $145 million,[21] though $100 million was spent on marketing.[22] It used pre-rendered backgrounds and character models instead of 2D sprites, in addition to introducing full-motion video sequences. Character models used on the field and those in battle differed, with blocky and less detailed models used on the field. When developing Final Fantasy VIII, Square Enix opted to use a more photo-realistic style, and there was no longer a distinction between field and battle models. The game used more FMVs, and required four discs of storage. Final Fantasy IX was similar, and though its art style was not one of a photorealistic game, it did allow for greater detail than seen previously in the series.

Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.

Several years passed, with Zelda remaining the same because of the curse. Link, who had become sixteen, learned of this tragedy and sets off on a journey to reclaim the lost section of the Triforce to lift the curse. Once Link gains the full Triforce, he goes back to the palace where Zelda resides in and disperses the curse. Now free from the curse, Zelda thanks Link and calls him a "real hero" for saving Hyrule. The curtains then fall as Link and Zelda appear to embrace each other.
Neutral attack Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 1% (Mega/Rock Buster) Mega Man fires up to three shots from his Mega Buster (AKA Rock Buster in Japanese), which have limited range and do less knockback at longer range. He lacks a proper forward tilt and neutral air due to his ability to shoot while walking forwards or jumping, though the moves do have minute differences. The Mega Buster itself does slightly more damage when combined up close with the shots fired.
This Princess Zelda is confirmed to be a direct descendant of Tetra,[12] the pirate captain who was also the incarnation of Princess Zelda in her day, and makes an appearance in a large stained glass window in Hyrule Castle's Throne Room.[133] Princess Zelda states that the Spirit Flute was played for her in her youth by her grandmother, and Anjean states that she gave the Spirit Flute to Tetra long ago, pointing out the similarities between the reigning Princess Zelda and her ancestor, the feisty pirate captain that arrived on the land's shores long ago.
Once rescued from Vaati, Link and Zelda flee down the Tower of Winds, similar to the escape from Ganon's Tower in Ocarina of Time. Zelda must be protected from damage during this escape. When nearing the exit however, the four Links and Zelda are sent tumbling deep beneath the tower by Ganon. While the four Link's are out cold, Zelda attempts to seal away Ganon with her magic, but is instead stopped and sealed away by Ganon himself. The four Links fight Ganon together, and eventually weaken him enough to break the seal on Zelda. Zelda then fights Ganon alongside the Links much like in The Wind Waker. While she does not wield the Light Arrows by name, she does wield a ball of light energy which, coupled with Link's arrows, serves the same function of the Light Arrows, stunning Ganon long enough for him to be drawn into the Four Sword. She must be protected from Ganon's attacks so the ball of light energy can become big enough to contain Ganon's evil might.
Mario Kart: Double Dash!! features co-operative LAN play and two-player karts.[3] It also introduces eleven new playable characters (Princess Daisy, Birdo, Baby Mario, Baby Luigi, Paratroopa, Diddy Kong, Bowser Jr., Waluigi, Toadette, Petey Piranha, and King Boo). The game also features special items that are specific to each character. Finally, this game introduced unlockable characters and karts to the series.
Zelda as Tetra displayed a tomboyish demeanor, taking challenges head on and even seeming bossy at times. At the beginning of the game, she does not think much of Link due to his habit of taking actions without thinking things through, and also due to the fact that he gets melancholic as they are setting sail to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue his sister.[117] Once Tetra discovers her true identity, she gains more respect towards the young hero, and apologizes for all that has happened to him and Aryll.[118] While Link and the King of Red Lions set out to look for the pieces of the Triforce of Courage, Zelda stays hidden away in a basement located inside Hyrule Castle in order to prevent getting caught by Ganondorf.[119] However, she is eventually found and is taken to Ganon's Tower, where Link must rescue her after assembling the Triforce of Courage.[120]
Wii	Mario Kart Wii was released for the Wii in 2008. For the first time in the series, the player can race using motorcycles (labeled in-game as "bikes") and perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, slipstreaming, and wheelies. The game is primarily played using the plastic Wii Wheel accessory, which uses the controller's motion sensing to simulate operating a steering wheel. The game features 24 playable characters, the largest roster of the series at the time (Baby Daisy makes her debut in the Mario franchise, and other new additions to the Mario Kart series include Baby Peach, Funky Kong, Dry Bowser, and Rosalina; Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable). The concept of retro tracks is expanded to the Battle mode, with one retro battle course from each game in the series. When Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was in existence, Mario Kart Wii allowed the VS and Battle modes to be played by up to twelve participants, and also featured the "Mario Kart Channel," which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu and allowed players to check their regional or global Time Trial rankings, send and receive ghost data, and participate in worldwide tournaments on modified courses with special objectives.

Mega Man has been slightly buffed in the game's updates. In 1.0.4, much like Wario, his grab release was altered to remove guaranteed combos several characters had on him out of an air release. Besides this, he only received minor buffs to his Leaf Shield, but in update 1.1.1, he had the speed of his Ice Slasher and Hyper Bomb custom specials slightly improved as well, along with a slight increase to Hyper Bomb's power and splash damage. However, the changes to shield mechanics make some of his projectiles, most notably his forward smash, less safe on shield due to their low hitlag.
Back to Zelda though, the atmosphere, graphics, sound and gameplay are all SPOT ON. There's crafting of Food, Potions, Weapons and Armor as well as a bunch of quests, side quests and tons of hidden content to keep you engrossed for at least the next several months... The Game of the Year buzz that this game has received is 100% deserved. Get this game! You will LOVE It!
LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.
Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.

At one point, there was also a game in the series planned for the Virtual Boy in 1995. Tentatively entitled VB Mario Kart, it was likely to be the first sequel to Super Mario Kart. The game was canceled due to the Virtual Boy's failure, and was never reported in the media until revealed in the August 2000 issue of German gaming magazine The Big N, along with other shelved projects for that system.[9] Even though the GBA already had its own official Mario Kart game in Super Circuit, a tech demo called Mario Kart XXL was made for that system by Manfred Trenz of the company "Denaris Entertainment Software".
So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
It's been eight years since Capcom released a Mega Man game. Just as things were looking grim two major things happened. The first was that Mighty No. 9 turned out to be a colossal failure. The second was that near the end of 2017 Capcom finally announced Mega Man 11. This was met with celebration and, well, worry. Keiji Inafune was no longer going to be working on it (but after Mighty No. 9 would you want his team to be?), the art style was very different and what we saw back then was tiny. The demo came out, leaving a good impression, but worries still plagued fans. After all, if Mega Man 11 wasn't good that'd be it for the Blue Bomber, and very few gamers want that. Mega Man is one of the most recognizable gaming icons of all time. The drought of no Mega Man games was felt throughout the industry. While he made guest appearances in games such as Super Smash Bros. for the Wii U and 3DS this was not the same as a full blown Mega Man game.

^ Nintendo (November 21, 1998). The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Nintendo 64. Nintendo. Great Deku Tree: Before time began, before spirits and life existed... Three golden goddesses descended upon the chaos that was Hyrule... Din, the Goddess of Power... Nayru, the Goddess of Wisdom... Farore, the Goddess of Courage... Din... With her strong flaming arms, she cultivated the land and created the red earth. Nayru... Poured her wisdom onto the earth and gave the spirit of law to the world. Farore... With her rich soul, produced all life forms who would uphold the law.
Game runs at a solid 60 fps, but when it is 3 or 4 player split-screen, the frame rate noticeable drops to 30 fps. Still playable though. Online was pretty smooth, and out of all the matches I played, I very rarely lost connection and when I did, it was during a lobby instead of during races. Mario Kart TV is a very nice touch since it saves the last 12 races that occurred. My petty complaint of it is that it doesn’t show the exact things you saw on your screen.
However, after Mega Man defeated the second set of four Robot Masters, he made his way to where Ballade was waiting and defeated him for a second time, acquiring the Ballade Cracker, which he used to blast his way out of Wily's crumbling fortress. Mega Man made his way to the Wily Battleship and defeated Wily, but was trapped in the fortress when Wily activated a self-destruct mechanism. Ballade, realizing his mistakes, decides to sacrifice himself at the last minute to save Mega Man in the end.
Lana and Cia reclaim the Triforce of Power and together with Link, and Princess Zelda who arrives after the battle with Impa use it to form the complete Triforce to undo the damage caused by Phantom Ganon causing Tetra, King Daphnes, and parts of the Great Sea to return to their dimension of origin. Afterwards Princess Zelda, Link, and Impa bid Lana and the reformed Cia farewell as they return to the valley of the Seers to both serve as the twin Guardians of Time as well as protect the Triforce of Power which they split between them.
The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][93] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[97] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[98] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[99]

In Skyward Sword, Zelda, daughter of Gaepora, lives in Skyloft with her childhood friend Link,[43] where they are both students at the Knight Academy.[44] After playing the role of the goddess at the Wing Ceremony, Link and Zelda go for a flight together, when suddenly a twister pulls Zelda and her Loftwing below the clouds. This phenomenon is later revealed to have been caused by Ghirahim, who needs Zelda's soul to resurrect Demise, his master.[45][46] Upon Zelda's arrival on the Surface, however, she is rescued by Impa before the Demon Lord can capture her.[47] Link then begins to look for Zelda and eventually finds her in the Earth Spring, but Impa impedes him from reaching the young girl,[48] and instead urges Zelda to continue praying at each goddess statue to finish purifying her body.[49][50]


It’s been eight long years since Capcom’s venerable Mega Man franchise last slapped a new numeral onto the end of its name, a span that’s seen the Blue Bomber’s NES contemporaries—most notably Nintendo’s own Mario and Zelda games—evolve dramatically in response to increasingly powerful technology and changing gaming philosophies. But while the franchise’s latest title, Mega Man 11, does its damnedest to try to teach itself a few new tricks, this might be the point where even the most devoted practitioners of the time-honored art of murdering octets of themed robots to steal their magical arm-guns have to accept that this series has comfortably settled into its limits, probably for good.

The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
What he means by this is that Zelda's mother couldn't teach how to access the power to seal Gannon away. As Zelda grew older, she became the gossip mongers favorite subject. Behind her back, they whispered how she was heir to the throne of nothing and how she was a failure. She grew frustrated when Link became her guard, and she expressed that feeling by shouting at him.
The series has had multiple directors: Sakaguchi directed the first five installments, Yoshinori Kitase and Ito collaboratively directed Final Fantasy VI, and the two went on to direct many later installments on their own. Ito directed Final Fantasy IX and Final Fantasy XII, while Kitase developed Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X. After Final Fantasy X Kitase decided to stop directing but remained involved as a producer instead, choosing Motomu Toriyama as the director for Final Fantasy XIII and its sequels. The MMO releases have had multiple directors, though most recently, Naoki Yoshida has directed Final Fantasy XIV. Hajime Tabata started with directing spin-off games for portable gaming systems with Before Crisis -Final Fantasy VII- and Crisis Core -Final Fantasy VII-, but when Final Fantasy Versus XIII became Final Fantasy XV Tabata took over the role of director.

Toward the end of Spirit Tracks, before the final battle against Malladus, Zelda is reunited with her body, and is no longer able to levitate. Link runs underneath her to catch her as she falls, and she lands on top of him and knocks them both to the ground. Upon awakening, Zelda, overjoyed to have her body back, embraces Link, causing him to blush. Finally, after Malladus is defeated, Zelda and Link watch Anjean and Byrne's spirits ascend to the heavens. The camera then lowers to show Zelda and Link holding hands while Zelda's Lullaby plays in the background. After the credits, a short cut-scene shows Zelda gazing at a picture of Link on the Spirit Train with her flying beside him, which she keeps on her desk. She may also wave at Link depending on his answer to a question Zelda asked him during the events of the story.
In 2005, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, a theatrical CGI film, and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII, a non-canon OVA,[48] were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was animated by Visual Works, which helped the company create CG sequences for the games.[49] The film, unlike The Spirits Within, gained mixed to positive reviews from critics[50][51][52] and has become a commercial success.[53] Last Order, on the other hand, was released in Japan in a special DVD bundle package with Advent Children. Last Order sold out quickly[54] and was positively received by Western critics,[55][56] though fan reaction was mixed over changes to established story scenes.[57]
Custom 1 Tornado Hold 2% (center), 1% (sides) Drops a spinning fan onto the ground that creates a tornado and pushes anyone caught in it upwards, dealing multiple hits. It can be also used to combo into the Flame Sword, Slash Claw or Air Shooter. If used in mid-air, it causes the fan to fall as it pushes Mega Man up, giving it better offensive potential but slightly less vertical distance than the Rush Coil. It is based on Tengu Man's weapon from Mega Man 8.

The next three titles would be released on PlayStation 2. Due to the more advanced technology, the games no longer relied on pre-rendered backgrounds, instead using the game engine to render the backgrounds immediately. Final Fantasy X improved in the facial expressions displayed by the characters, using skeletal animation technology and motion capture, to allow the characters to make more realistic lip movements to match the new voice acting, a first in the series which previously was restricted to text-based story telling. The following release, Final Fantasy XI, was the first in the series to use online multiplayer features, which was another expensive development project for the company.[23] Final Fantasy XII would later use only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X in exchange for improved lighting and texture rendering.[24]
Princess Zelda was set to appear in the unreleased game Mystical Seed of Courage. In the game, she was to be the one responsible for managing the four seasons of Hyrule, in a role similar to Din's in Oracle of Seasons. She would be kidnapped by Ganon, which, along with the disappearance of the Rod of Seasons, would cause Hyrule's seasons to go out of control.

The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.


Zelda is portrayed as a young girl or beautiful young woman, usually with blonde hair. In Twilight Princess, however (and therefore in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, as well as Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U, in which her appearance is based on that of Twilight Princess), she is depicted as a brunette. She also has light brown hair in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (though she is depicted as being blonde in artwork), and auburn hair in The Adventure of Link.
When Link goes back to the castle, she expends all of her power, even losing her physical form, in order to save a dying Midna. She regains her body later only to become possessed by Ganondorf, but his influence is purged from her body by Midna with the power of the Fused Shadows. Ganondorf makes another attempt on Zelda's life soon after, but she is protected by the Light Spirits of Hyrule, who grant her the magical Light Arrows so she can assist Link in part of his final battle. With the battle won and Midna revived, Zelda and Link bid her goodbye at the Mirror of Twilight.
I beat Mega Man 11 on Normal in about eight hours. I’m no speed runner, but Mega Man 11 provides a lot of options for Mega Masochists looking for timed challenges, including remixes of levels with leaderboards, most of which unlock when you beat the campaign for the first time: Jump Saver challenges you not to jump, Buster Breakdown challenges you not to shoot, and Balloon Rush adds balloons that you have to destroy or avoid based on their color. I had spent enough time with Mega Man 8’s levels by this point so I didn’t have much drive to put up my times. The best bonus mode, though, is the mysterious Dr. Light’s Trial, which is an ultra-hard, one-life-only set of unique levels similar to Breath of the Wild’s Trial of the Sword DLC -- and even better, it unlocks another mystery trial mode (whose trial could that be?). Finally, you can pump up the difficulty to Superhero and play through the campaign again, if you dare.
+The beautiful art style makes up for anything lacking in the graphics department. The Wii U and Switch are not on par with the PS4 and Xbox One, so don't expect that type of beauty, but the art style truly does make a big difference. Nintendo has always been king when it comes to gorgeous art and design. Exploration is one of the game's biggest draws. Conquering the 100+ shrines is amazing!
The Champions' Ballad: A mysterious voice beckons Link to challenge the Divine Beast Tamer's Trials. He must now prove himself by defeating enemies using the One-Hit Obliterator, conquering new Shrines, challenging a full dungeon, and overcoming many trials along the way. Once all challenges and trials have been bested, Link will obtain a new power known as the Master Cycle Zero! Additionally, the bard Kass is traveling Hyrule to complete the unfinished song his teacher left behind. As Link and Kass chase their respective goals, Kass will share new original songs he wrote capturing lost memories of the four Champions and Zelda, previously unknown to Link. But that unfinished song... What could it be? *To play The Champions' Ballad, you must first complete the Main Quest to free the four Divine Beasts.
The actions made by this incarnation of Princess Zelda were crucial to the development of the Zelda Timeline, since it was through Zelda's choices that three timelines were eventually created, making her instrumental in the history of Hyrule. Her plot with Link to retrieve the Triforce resulted in Ganondorf obtaining the Triforce of Power,[67] eventually leading to Ganondorf besting Link in the final battle, and thus forming the Fallen Hero Timeline.[76] Should Link succeed in defeating Ganondorf, sending Link back to his own time afterwards created two timelines: the Child Timeline and the Adult Timeline. The latter of the two shatters the Triforce of Courage and vanquishes the hero in the Adult Timeline,[77] resulting in Hyrule eventually being flooded.
Mario Kart Wii features multiple game modes: Grand Prix, Time Trials, Versus, and Battle. All modes support single-player gameplay; Versus and Battle support local multiplayer for up to four players, with or without computer-controlled players. In Grand Prix, the player participates in four three-lap races from one of eight cups against eleven opponents. The player is awarded points at the end of each race based on their ranking. The total number of points collected determines the player's overall rank. Versus mode is similar to Grand Prix, but the presented courses and items may configurable. In Time Trials, the player must quickly complete the race in the fastest time possible— there are no opponents or items except for three Mushrooms given at the start of each race. The player can compete against a ghost character, which mimics a player's movements from an earlier race. Ghost data can be saved in the Wii console memory.
This Princess Zelda is confirmed to be a direct descendant of Tetra,[12] the pirate captain who was also the incarnation of Princess Zelda in her day, and makes an appearance in a large stained glass window in Hyrule Castle's Throne Room.[133] Princess Zelda states that the Spirit Flute was played for her in her youth by her grandmother, and Anjean states that she gave the Spirit Flute to Tetra long ago, pointing out the similarities between the reigning Princess Zelda and her ancestor, the feisty pirate captain that arrived on the land's shores long ago.
Sheik is Princess Zelda's Sheikah alter ego in Ocarina of Time. Wearing a blue, possibly armored suit with the red Sheikah eye in the center, and with voice muffled and face concealed, the character is essentially unrecognizable and appears relatively masculine. It is possible that Zelda utilizes her magical skills in altering her appearance. Sheik plays a lyre and teaches Link new songs to help him on his quest. When Link arrives at the Temple of Time near the end of the game, Sheik transforms back into Princess Zelda.
K'Nex produced sets with tracks from the game and figures of Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, and Bowser in karts and bikes. These have been released to promote Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7, and Mario Kart 8. McDonald's released an eight-character set of Happy Meal toys based on Mario Kart 8, where the characters' karts were customizable with stickers. Nintendo itself has also offered Mario Kart-related merchandise, such as a soundtrack for Mario Kart 64 offered by mail; and varying pieces of merchandise through the Club Nintendo customer rewards program, such as a Mario Kart Wii-themed stopwatch, gold trophies modeled after those in Mario Kart 7, and a CD featuring the soundtrack of Mario Kart 8.
The music was composed by Asuka Ohta and Ryo Nagamatsu; who both used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games alongside original material. A 46-track official soundtrack was released in December 2011 as a Club Nintendo reward in Japan.[18] The speaker on the Wii Remote is frequently used during gameplay, as sound effects like crashes and warning signals are emitting from it. During the extensive testing of the different Wii Wheel prototypes, the developers decided to have the voice actors playing the game during recording sessions.[14]
Mega Man, known as Rockman (ロックマン Rokkuman, from the phrase "Rock 'n Roll") in Japan, also known as Mega or Rock in his original form, is the title protagonist of the "Classic" Mega Man series developed by Capcom since 1987. The pixel art for Mega Man was created by the designer of the original game in the series, Akira Kitamura (credited under the pseudonym "A.K"), and later turned into a refined illustration by Keiji Inafune (credited under his famous pseudonym "Inafking").[2][3] Since then, he has become one of the company's primary original characters and continues to be one of the video game industry's most recognizable icons. Having appeared on many gaming systems since the Nintendo Entertainment System, Mega Man has had a wide gaming audience, and his games continue to evolve with the ever-changing hardware demands of modern gaming systems. Mega Man's fictional universe can be divided into seven categories, each featuring different variations and incarnations of the same blue hero. Although "Mega Man", or "Rockman", is usually the name used to describe only the original Mega Man from the classic series, it can also be used less specifically to describe the Mega Man series of fictional works, or the group of adherently named main characters within.

As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.

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