Princess Zelda is often shown as a beautiful and elegant princess, with the exception of Skyward Sword, where she is portrayed as an ordinary girl before the kingdom of Hyrule had been established. She is always either a child, teen, or young adult. Her hair color is depicted as blonde in most games of the series, as well as brunette in Twilight Princess and red in The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link. Her eyes are portrayed in different shades of blue throughout all the games, with the exception of her green eyes in Breath of the Wild. Her ears are pointy, as is characteristic of all Hylians, although in some games her ears tend to be shorter than in others. The dresses that she wears are long with determinate colors, such as different tones of pink, white, and blue. Most of her dresses are shown with the Hylian Crest, and in almost every game, she is seen wearing a tiara with either a red, pink, or blue jewel in it. In some games, she also wears long gloves. Princess Zelda is seen wearing makeup in most games, such as in The Wind Waker and Spirit Tracks, and her hairstyle is characterized either with her hair down or with braids. She wears high heels, although in Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword, and Breath of the Wild she wears boots. She also occasionally wears sandals, such as in Skyward Sword and Breath of the Wild.
Initially, the player assumes control as Zelda, although it is possible to start a round as Sheik by holding down the A button following selection of a stage until the round begins. Zelda is somewhat slow but is rather graceful and agile, and her special attacks, if they connect, are extremely powerful—boosted by magic, if the sparkles and flashes of light are any indication. Her aerial movements and dodging skill, as well as her attacks' high priority and strong impact, make her an ideal counter-defensive character. She is very much built for defensive attacking, but her moves leave her very open if timed incorrectly, and if attacked, her gracefulness can work against her. She has a light frame and is easily sent flying.
1UP.com described Mega Man as "Capcom's ill-treated mascot", and "one of the most incongruous characters of all time", saying "it wouldn't be completely incorrect to assume that the popularity of the series has almost nothing to do with Mega Man himself", but with "his rivals, his enemies, and their abilities."[60] IGN agreed with his dependency on support characters, saying Zero is "cooler than Mega Man".[61] Den of Geek listed Mega Man's incarnation from Street Fighter X Tekken as the 15th best cameo in fighting game history due to how it represented Capcom's lack of interest in featuring other games as of 2012, as well as the apparent self-mockery of it due to Mega Man's poor characterization.[62] Destructoid described this Mega Man as "legit" stating it was "an unexpected and interesting creative decision by [Capcom] using this version of Mega Man to represent them in what may be one of their biggest games of 2012".[63]

In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Zelda is revealed to be the hope of the people.[85] She is the one who sends Impa to Labrynna and Holodrum to find Nayru, the Oracle of Ages,[86] and Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and bring them to Hyrule for safety. Zelda herself appears if the two games are linked. When players have defeated both General Onox and Veran in the linked game, Twinrova will kidnap Zelda in order to sacrifice her to resurrect Ganon.[87] Link dashes to her rescue and Twinrova fails to sacrifice Zelda, making them to sacrifice themselves in order to resurrect Ganon. Due to the fact that they could not sacrifice Zelda as planned, the Ganon they resurrect is mindless and raging and is defeated by Link. In these games, Zelda has a sprite similar to that of Marin, the girl Link mistakes for Zelda when he wakes up at the beginning of Link's Awakening.
Zelda tried to rally the other fighters to fight the army of Master Hands by saying, "Stow your fear; it's now or never!". Zelda was present when Galeem unleashed its beams of light. Zelda and Mewtwo attempted to reflect the beams using Nayru's Love and Confusion, respectively, but this attempt failed, and both of them were vaporized and transformed into spirits along with the rest of the fighters (excluding Kirby).
In April 2008, Miyamoto stated that "the Zelda team is forming again to work on new games".[87] Miyamoto clarified in July that the Zelda team had been working on a new Zelda game for the Wii.[88] In January 2010, Nintendo Executive Satoru Iwata stated that the game would be coming out at some time in 2010, and confirmed that the game would make use of the Wii's MotionPlus feature, which had been announced too late to be integrated into the Twilight Princess Wii release. The game's subtitle was announced at E3 in 2010 as Skyward Sword, but its release was delayed to 2011.[89] The game, the earliest in the Legend of Zelda timeline, reveals the origins of Hyrule, Ganon and many elements featured in previous games. It was released on November 20, 2011; the first run included a 25th Anniversary CD of fully orchestrated music from various Zelda games, including Skyward Sword.

Jump up ↑ "There are three kinds of Triforce -- Power, Wisdom, and Courage. [...] Of the three, I have left Power and Wisdom in the kingdom. But the Triforce Courage I have hidden for a reason. [...] The Triforce of Courage is hidden in the Great Palace in the Valley of Death on the largest island in Hyrule." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 9, 10)

A number of official books, novels, and gamebooks have been released based on the series as well. The earliest was Moblin's Magic Spear, published in 1989 by Western Publishing under their Golden Books Family Entertainment division and written by Jack C. Harris. It took place sometime during the first game. Two gamebooks were published as part of the Nintendo Adventure Books series by Archway, both of which were written by Matt Wayne. The first was The Crystal Trap (which focuses more on Zelda) and the second was The Shadow Prince. Both were released in 1992. A novel based on Ocarina of Time was released in 1999, written by Jason R. Rich and published by Sybex Inc. under their Pathways to Adventure series. Another two gamebooks were released as part of the You Decide on the Adventure series published by Scholastic. The first book was based on Oracle of Seasons and was released in 2001. The second, based on Oracle of Ages, was released in 2002. Both were written by Craig Wessel. In 2006, Scholastic released a novel as part of their Nintendo Heroes series, Link and the Portal of Doom. It was written by Tracey West and was set shortly after the events of Ocarina of Time.


Long long time mega man fan. It's by far my favorite series. 2 and 9 have been my 2 favorites, but 1...1 may have just move to the top. I absolutely love this game. Capcom nailed it. I feel like they really need to do MM2 with this art style and play control. The game looks beautiful! Definitely buy this game. The gear system is amazing, all the weapons are great and very useful. Great game to speedrun, can't wait to see where this goes! See More
Down special	Default	Leaf Shield	2% (circling), 3.8% (thrown)	Mega Man summons leaf-shaped units that electromagnetically orbit around him. The leaves block projectiles, and can be fired forwards by pressing an attack button to land multiple hits, or used to deal additional damage to a grabbed enemy. The move is based on Wood Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.

Early on in the timeline of the series, the original Zelda, while born as a Hylian, is the mortal incarnation of the Goddess Hylia.[18] Carrying on this divine blood, her female descendants are often named after her and are always the crown princess of Hyrule throughout its history.[3][19][20][21][22] Several princesses within the bloodline are also the possessor of the Triforce of Wisdom, imbued with the essence of the Goddess Nayru.[3][23][24] The essence of Nayru affords each Zelda divine wisdom, allowing them to discern the wisest decisions, especially in situations concerning the welfare of Hyrule. It grants them a myriad of mystical abilities, including the ability to heal others, though there is a possibility that this could also be an effect of their bloodline passing down Hylia's own powers and, later, the Light Force. Each incarnation of Zelda uses their powers to keep evil in check.
Although Sheik is intended to appear masculine, it is unclear whether Princess Zelda physically transforms herself into a male or simply dresses herself to look like one. When Link encounters Princess Ruto in the Water Temple, Ruto explains, "A young man named Sheik rescued me from under the ice". Later, when Link obtains the Water Medallion, Ruto asks, "If you see Sheik, please give him my thanks". Additionally, a Gossip Stone in the Hyrule Castle Grounds says, "They say that contrary to her elegant image, Princess Zelda of Hyrule Castle is, in fact, a tomboy!"
Several video games have either been adapted into or have had spin-offs in the form of manga and novels. The first was the novelization of Final Fantasy II in 1989, and was followed by a manga adaptation of Final Fantasy III in 1992.[62][63] The past decade has seen an increase in the number of non-video game adaptations and spin-offs. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within has been adapted into a novel, the spin-off game Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles has been adapted into a manga, and Final Fantasy XI has had a novel and manga set in its continuity.[64][65][66][67] Seven novellas based on the Final Fantasy VII universe have also been released. The Final Fantasy: Unlimited story was partially continued in novels and a manga after the anime series ended.[68] The Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII series have also had novellas and audio dramas released. Two games, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance and Final Fantasy: Unlimited, have been adapted into radio dramas.
Enemies are weak to at least one weapon; for instance, Fire Man will take more damage from Ice Man's weapon than from other weapons. This concept draws inspiration from rock-paper-scissors. Robot Master levels can generally be completed in any order, resulting in a strategic hallmark of the series: determining the best order to defeat bosses and earn weapons. Sequels of Mega Man games contain new enemies alongside familiar ones, new bosses and weapons, and perhaps new gadgets. Later installments of the game give the player the option of commanding other player characters with different abilities, such as Proto Man, Duo, and Bass.
However, after Mega Man defeated the second set of four Robot Masters, he made his way to where Ballade was waiting and defeated him for a second time, acquiring the Ballade Cracker, which he used to blast his way out of Wily's crumbling fortress. Mega Man made his way to the Wily Battleship and defeated Wily, but was trapped in the fortress when Wily activated a self-destruct mechanism. Ballade, realizing his mistakes, decides to sacrifice himself at the last minute to save Mega Man in the end.
…which is nothing compared to how online play is like. I will admit that I have seen some pretty nasty moves that other players have pulled like people in lower places firing behind them a lot even though they are clearly in range of the racers ahead of them. Other instances where racers shoot each other a lot can end up giving first place an even bigger lead due to constant sabotage. I have ran into some instances where I was hit more times than the AI does in a single race. You could be doing so well and be on the final stretch when a blue shell appears and blows you up, then end up getting hit by other players so many times, that you end up in last place.
The second game, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, was released for the Famicom Disk System in Japan on January 14, 1987,[56] and for the Nintendo Entertainment System in Europe in November 1988 and North America in December 1988. The game exchanged the top-down perspective for side-scrolling (though the top-down point of view was retained for overworld areas), and introduced RPG elements (such as experience points) not used previously or thereafter in the series. The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II were released in gold-coloured cartridges instead of the console's regular grey cartridges. Both were re-released in the final years of the Nintendo Entertainment System with grey cartridges.

Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game.
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