Game Boy Advance Mario Kart: Super Circuit for Game Boy Advance, developed by Intelligent Systems, was released in 2001 as the first Mario Kart title for a handheld console. It retains the traditional elements of Mario Kart established by its predecessors; however, it is not without its new additions. Mario Kart: Super Circuit is the first entry in the series to feature unlockable retro tracks from a previous installment (in its case, the Super Mario Kart tracks). It is also the first installment where, in addition to the usual trophy, the player is also awarded with a ranking based on their performance. During a linked VS mode with only one cartridge, players can only choose from the four SNES Mushroom Cup courses, and must play as a Yoshi of a specific color. If all players have a cartridge, all racers and courses are available. This is the first Mario Kart game to have a feature that allows players to swap ghost data, in its case via the use of the GBA's Link Cable.


Character growth determines how player characters learn new abilities and boost their stats. Unlike battle systems, character growth systems are less consistent throughout the series, and players must internalize the systems to make the correct decisions. The only consistent character growth mechanic used in the series has been the level based system where characters raise their level through experience points earned in battle to improve stats and sometimes learn new abilities. Even this system has been excluded from some games, such as in Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII, where only ability points are accumulated from battles that can be expended for both better stats and new skills.
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[158][159][160][161][162][163] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[164] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[142][165] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[166]

At one point, there was also a game in the series planned for the Virtual Boy in 1995. Tentatively entitled VB Mario Kart, it was likely to be the first sequel to Super Mario Kart. The game was canceled due to the Virtual Boy's failure, and was never reported in the media until revealed in the August 2000 issue of German gaming magazine The Big N, along with other shelved projects for that system.[9] Even though the GBA already had its own official Mario Kart game in Super Circuit, a tech demo called Mario Kart XXL was made for that system by Manfred Trenz of the company "Denaris Entertainment Software".


Following the Japanese launch of F-Zero, a Super Nintendo Entertainment System game which was exclusively single-player, Nintendo developers decided to create a two-player racing game for that console as a follow-up.[1] They made a prototype that featured a generic "guy in overalls"; it was decided that Mario characters and concepts be included when the developers added Mario driving one of the karts, out of curiosity as to how the game would look, and were satisfied with it.[1] Thus, the Mario Kart series was born, with its first title, Super Mario Kart, released for the SNES on August 27, 1992. Development of the first Mario Kart game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, then the general manager of Nintendo's EAD division, who is best known for creating the Mario franchise and other successful Nintendo properties. Darran Jones of Imagine Publishing's magazine NowGamer attributed the original success of Mario Kart to its use of the Mario characters and to being a new type of racing game.[2]

Throughout the lifespan of The Legend of Zelda series, a number of games (including main series games as well as re-releases and spin-offs) in varying states of completeness have had their releases cancelled. Perhaps the earliest of these was Gottlieb's The Legend of Zelda Pinball Machine (cancelled 1993). After securing a license from Nintendo to produce two Nintendo-franchise-based pinball machines, pinball designer Jon Norris was tasked with designing the table. Before it was completed, Gottlieb decided to repurpose the game with an American Gladiators theme. Licensing for this version ultimately fell through and the game was released as simply Gladiators (November 1993).[103]


When Link goes back to the castle, she expends all of her power, even losing her physical form, in order to save a dying Midna. She regains her body later only to become possessed by Ganondorf, but his influence is purged from her body by Midna with the power of the Fused Shadows. Ganondorf makes another attempt on Zelda's life soon after, but she is protected by the Light Spirits of Hyrule, who grant her the magical Light Arrows so she can assist Link in part of his final battle. With the battle won and Midna revived, Zelda and Link bid her goodbye at the Mirror of Twilight.
Mario Kart Wii was officially announced at E3 2007; the online features and the first footage of the game were shown at the Expo.[16] During Nintendo of America CEO Reggie Fils-Aimé's presentation, he unveiled the game via a trailer that showed some of the new characters and tracks. The trailer also displayed that the game would include up to twelve simultaneous racers. Additional details of the game were later released in conjunction with the Nintendo Fall 2007 Conference held in October 2007, where it was revealed that it would include bikes and the Wii Wheel. New gameplay footage from the game was also shown, and the release date was revealed to be set for spring 2008.[17]
Throughout the lifespan of The Legend of Zelda series, a number of games (including main series games as well as re-releases and spin-offs) in varying states of completeness have had their releases cancelled. Perhaps the earliest of these was Gottlieb's The Legend of Zelda Pinball Machine (cancelled 1993). After securing a license from Nintendo to produce two Nintendo-franchise-based pinball machines, pinball designer Jon Norris was tasked with designing the table. Before it was completed, Gottlieb decided to repurpose the game with an American Gladiators theme. Licensing for this version ultimately fell through and the game was released as simply Gladiators (November 1993).[103]
The Final Fantasy series has now grown to 15 core games, along with over dozens of spin-offs, sequels, remakes, ports, movies, and more. Final Fantasy I was first released in 1987 (JP), now coming up to Square Enix's 30th anniversary, Final Fantasy XV awaits to be released for the upcoming XBOX One and PS4. The popularity of the franchise continues to grow as it continues to pave the road in RPG creativity and innovation. As the series continues to expand, the complete game list below will be updated accordingly.
However Urbosa's Diary reveals that Urbosa has known Zelda for most of her life as the Queen of Hyrule brought the newborn Zelda to Gerudo Town as she and Gerudo Chieftain Urbosa were close friends in addition to being sworn allies. When the Queen died suddenly when Zelda was six, Urbosa attended the state funeral as both Gerudo Chieftain and a friend. However she worried about Zelda to the point a year after the funeral she went to Hyrule Castle to find out how Zelda was coping and even accompanied Zelda to the Spring of Power in place of Zelda's mother who was originally supposed to oversee Zelda's training but her death occured before Zelda began her training. Urbosa watched as Zelda fervently prayed to Hylia in the cold water until Urbosa was forced to pull her out causing Zelda to break down from all the pressure she was under along with her holding in her grief. Urbosa consoled Zelda as she let out all the emotions and grief she had been suppressing. Urbosa was one of the few people who understood the pressure Zelda was under and also was aware of the fact Zelda had been putting on a brave face after her mother's death while in truth grieved her mother's death as much if not more so than Urbosa and her father. Urbosa and Zelda became friends with Urbosa acting as a surrogate mother or aunt figure to Zelda. In addition to Urbosa's hatred of Ganon due to his origins as Ganondorf, Urbosa became a Champion to support Zelda despite her own people and advisers being against it. Urbosa however did her best to assist Link in finding Zelda when she abused Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail and hoped the two would eventually get along showing while she cared for Zelda she did not share Zelda's biased opinion towards Link and likely recognized Zelda resented Link's talent given her struggles to awaken her power which Urbosa witnessed first hand. Like Link, Urbosa was fiercely protective of Zelda as she foiled an assassination attempt by the Yiga Clan and was prepared to kill them though relented when Zelda requested their lives be spared as the Yiga were simply misguided Sheikah angered over their peoples mistreatment in the past. However Urbosa had her soldiers gather intel on the Yiga Clan as they were still servents of Ganon. She was pleased Zelda and Link started getting along after Link had foiled another assassination attempt. As signs of Ganon's imminent return increased, Urbosa feared Zelda would run out of time to awaken her power and chose to pray to the late Queen of Hyrule's spirit instead of Hylia who failed to answer Zelda's prayers indicating Urbosa had more faith in Zelda's mother than Hylia. Additionally Urbosa took up the late Queen's habit of affectionately calling Zelda her little bird.
The Fallen Hero Timeline is the timeline in which Link, the Hero of Time, despite his best efforts, was defeated by Ganondorf in the final battle. This turn of events created the timeline containing A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons, Oracle of Ages, Link's Awakening, A Link Between Worlds, Tri Force Heroes, The Legend of Zelda, and The Adventure of Link.

Each setting often features some form of magic (sometimes spelled magick), though it often differs between the different lores. In many settings, magic is the power of the world's Crystals. In Final Fantasy VI magic has become a rarity, with many resorting to magitek (magic technology). In Final Fantasy VII, magic is a product of the Lifestream and can be used via Materia, though scientists have stated that "magic" is an unfitting term for a force of nature. In Final Fantasy XII, magick is provided by the mysterious substance known as Mist that seeps from the inside of the planet.


Certain incarnations, like the Zelda of Skyloft and Tetra, are shown to have a slightly playful personality and more casual attitude. However, this is likely due to the fact that neither was raised to be royalty from birth unlike most incarnations of Princess Zelda. The Zelda of Skyloft was indeed born a commoner and Tetra is the child of a pirate. Additionally, at least two incarnations are known to have tomboyish qualities, such as Tetra and the Zelda from Ocarina of Time.
^ "Zelda: The interview!". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. November 17, 2004. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved May 30, 2010. NoE: How does the Minish Cap fit into the Zelda chronology? Is it a prequel to the upcoming The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures on GameCube? Aonuma: Yes, this title takes place prior to The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, and tells the secret of the birth of the Four Sword.
Zelda appears again in A Link Between Worlds. At her young age, she rules the entire kingdom of Hyrule alone. When Link first meets her, he warns her that Seres was attacked and turned into a Painting by Yuga. She tells the young hero to warn Sahasrahla in Kakariko Village and gives Link a charm that she has owned since childhood. When Hyrule Castle is under Yuga's attack, Link learns that the charm she gave is the Pendant of Courage, which she gave to him in anticipation of the oncoming misfortune.
In 1990, a junior novel version of Mega Man 2 was released as part of the Worlds of Power novel series. Mega Man is turned human by Dr. Light during an accident in a machine designed to clone Mega Man. Instead of a Mega Buster, human Mega Man uses a hand gun and instead of being able to copy the robot master's weapons, he instead takes them off of their arms. For some reason being human does not affect him much and he is still able to consume E-drinks (Energy Tanks) and gain a power boost. The book follows the general plot of Mega Man 2 and even provides game hints at the end of some chapters.
Nintendo DS Mario Kart DS, released for the Nintendo DS in 2005, is the second title to be released on a handheld gaming system. It returns to the one-person karts used before Double Dash!!, and includes a new Mission Mode, where the player must complete eight missions (ranging from collecting coins to attacking enemies) in one of seven sets, and engage in battles with bosses from Super Mario 64 DS. The game makes use of the DS's dual-screen features by using the top screen to display the racer's kart and the bottom screen to show either a course overview or a bird's-eye view of the immediate vicinity. Dry Bones and R.O.B. (and Shy Guy for one-cartridge multiplayer mode) make their Mario Kart debut in this game, with this being R.O.B.'s sole appearance thus far. Mario Kart DS features a multiplayer mode where players can race each other using the DS Download Play feature or a multi-card wireless LAN service; additionally, it was also playable online via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service until its termination in 2014. Furthermore, the use of unlockable retro tracks from earlier installments was reintroduced here and made a permanent feature of the series.
King Rhoam initially supported Zelda's research efforts though as signs of Ganon's return increased eventually he came to believe Zelda was using her studies as an escape and was neglecting her duty as Princess of Hyrule to play scholar unaware Zelda had been training as hard as she could and was using her studies to contribute without her powers. However King Rhoam put his duty before Zelda and scolded her during a Guardian test trying to convince her that she should be focusing every waking moment to awakening her power. Zelda however insisted she already was and tried to explain herself though King Rhoam refused to hear anymore excuses and forbid her from further research. Rhoam attempted to encourage Zelda by telling her that the gossip mongers had been whispering she would inherit a Kingdom of nothing and that it was her destiny to prove them wrong. This however had the opposite effect and led to her having a sense of self loathing due to her "uselessness in the battle field" and inability to awaken her innate powers. She continued to do research such as a survey of the Shrines alongside her Sheikah court poet in secret.
Three weeks after Wily found Ra Moon, the electromagnetic field begins to affect all the machinery and electronics around the world. Roll falls into a coma victim of the electromagnetic field, and Wily makes a worldwide broadcast saying to the world surrender for him in two weeks, or else he will shut down all machinery, which would effectively kill Roll and all the robots around the world, and without them, humans would die as well. Dr. Light quickly immunizes Mega Man and his brothers (the Robot Masters from Mega Man 1 : Cut Man, Elec Man, Ice Man, Fire Man, Bomb Man, and Guts Man) from the electromagnetic field, and sends them to stop Dr. Wily before it's too late. During the adventure, Mega Man and his comrades fought their way to the source of Electromagnetic field, Ra Moon, battling the Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and 3 in the process. In the end, Mega Man manages to destroy Ra Moon and the eletromagnetic field ceases, Roll recovers and all the machinery around the world starts functioning again.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
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