The changes to Zelda's move set in this game were mostly balancing issues. Essentially, Zelda was powered up, with several of her moves being made more powerful and easier to execute. This can be seen in Din's Fire, which is substantially more powerful than in Super Smash Bros. Melee, and in several of Zelda's Smash Attacks, which literally "stop time" for a moment before sending the opposing character flying off the screen. She retains her massively powerful "Lightning Kick" from Super Smash Bros. Melee. Sheik's attacks, meanwhile, were made weaker but faster.
Mega Man 11 sticks so close to the established formula that it wouldn’t have made much of a splash if it had come out in 2008, or 1998. In fact, it has more in common with 1996’s Mega Man 8 than any other game in the series, and feels like a direct sequel to it. I found Mega Man 11 amusingly difficult even with the help of the time-slowing Double Gear system and there are some cool robot moments, but in a series with such great highs (Mega Man 2, 3, 9,10, specifically) and lows (Mega Man 7), it’s pretty average. The robot bosses are mostly bland and familiar (with the exception of the very silly Block Man – I love that guy), and their imparted weapons are a hit-and-miss collection. But Mega Man plays like he should even with the cutesy but tolerable art style, and that’s good because the challenge is cranked up to 11 and getting through these levels takes old-school precision and patience. Mega Man 11 is a good foundation for the next 10 Mega Man games.

While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.
Mega Man Legacy Collections keeps the look and feel of the classic games while updating them to fit modern HD television sets and the Switch’s display. The option to change viewing modes allows you to enjoy the game in its original 4:3 aspect ratio, full screen or widescreen. However, the widescreen option stretches the game out too much and is not very appealing, especially when playing on the Switch’s handheld mode. I definitely recommend keeping the original screen ratio to give it that arcade feel. The filter options for Legacy Collections are also awesome, especially if you’re trying to maximize that arcade feel. Set the game filter to “monitor” and it’ll feel like you’re playing on an arcade box.
Take part in an epic and ever-changing FINAL FANTASY as you adventure and explore with friends from around the world. The starter edition is perfect for newcomers as it includes the award-winning FINAL FANTASY XIV: A Realm Reborn experience and lets you begin your adventure as the Warrior of Light all the way through level 50. Join others from around the world and start your own FINAL FANTASY adventure today!
In the Hyrule Warriors series, Princess Zelda acts as the Supreme Leader of the Hyrulean Forces and the Hyrulean Soldiers bravely serve her in much the same way as in Twilight Princess and Ocarina of Time. Despite her role as a military commander, she retains the compassion for the soldiers that serve under her but chooses to fight alongside them rather than protected by them. In turn her soldiers are very loyal to her and she can raise their moral with words alone, though this can be a double-edged sword as they become quite demoralized when she goes missing and were it not for the leadership of Link and Impa, the entire Hyrulean Forces may have been defeated by the Dark Forces. Though she later returned to fight alongside them under her guise as Sheik, they did not recognize her (though to be fair neither did Impa) and continued to search for the missing Princess. However they were relived when her identity was revealed and did not hold her deception against her. They also did not abandon her or Hyrule when Ganondorf managed to steal the Triforce of Courage and Triforce of Wisdom and later joined her in invading Gerudo Desert in order to defeat Ganondorf's generals, Zant and Ghirahim. After managing to defeat the villains, Zelda would lead her army to reclaim Hyrule Castle and defeat Ganondorf's Forces. The surviving soldiers would also fight alongside Zelda and her allies in the final battle against Ganon.

One key theme in the series is dualism, presented in many ways, such as through a contrast between two worlds, between two heroes/heroines, and between a protagonist and an antagonist. Most often this dualism represents a balance that is disturbed by outside forces, forcing the protagonists to restore it. Other times, the "balance" set is deemed unjust by the protagonists and they must instead end the cycle to free the world.
Wii Mario Kart Wii was released for the Wii in 2008. For the first time in the series, the player can race using motorcycles (labeled in-game as "bikes") and perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, slipstreaming, and wheelies. The game is primarily played using the plastic Wii Wheel accessory, which uses the controller's motion sensing to simulate operating a steering wheel. The game features 24 playable characters, the largest roster of the series at the time (Baby Daisy makes her debut in the Mario franchise, and other new additions to the Mario Kart series include Baby Peach, Funky Kong, Dry Bowser, and Rosalina; Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable). The concept of retro tracks is expanded to the Battle mode, with one retro battle course from each game in the series. When Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was in existence, Mario Kart Wii allowed the VS and Battle modes to be played by up to twelve participants, and also featured the "Mario Kart Channel," which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu and allowed players to check their regional or global Time Trial rankings, send and receive ghost data, and participate in worldwide tournaments on modified courses with special objectives.
The Final Fantasy series has also featured a more basic, traditional turn-based system, such as the original Final Fantasy through to Final Fantasy III that do not rely on time, but the player and the enemy party take turns executing commands. Final Fantasy X features a Conditional Turn-Based Battle system where turns are taken based on an Act List, the turn order depending on the units' stats and statuses, and commands being ranked usually with stronger commands having longer "recovery time" until the unit can act again.
Websites such as IGN, GameSpot, GamesRadar, and 1UP.com retrospectively held Mega Man X as a successful milestone in transitioning the Mega Man series from its increasingly stale existence on the NES to the SNES.[26][27][22][28] Brett Elston of GamesRadar stated, "X was a total reinvention of the series, a perfectly executed update that had fans anticipating its release with a fervor the franchise hadn't seen since the Mega Man 2 and 3 days."[27]
Driving up a waterfall or across the ceiling can provide an intense adrenaline rush, but that's not all anti-gravity is good for. It also provides a wild new gameplay mechanic: if you collide into other racers in zero-g, you'll earn speed boosts worth bragging about. Upload and share your best moments and watch your friends' using Mario Kart TV. Returning features include 12-player online play, gliders, underwater racing, motorbikes, and custom karts. You can even race as Bowser's seven minions, the Koopalings.
I beat Mega Man 11 on Normal in about eight hours. I’m no speed runner, but Mega Man 11 provides a lot of options for Mega Masochists looking for timed challenges, including remixes of levels with leaderboards, most of which unlock when you beat the campaign for the first time: Jump Saver challenges you not to jump, Buster Breakdown challenges you not to shoot, and Balloon Rush adds balloons that you have to destroy or avoid based on their color. I had spent enough time with Mega Man 8’s levels by this point so I didn’t have much drive to put up my times. The best bonus mode, though, is the mysterious Dr. Light’s Trial, which is an ultra-hard, one-life-only set of unique levels similar to Breath of the Wild’s Trial of the Sword DLC -- and even better, it unlocks another mystery trial mode (whose trial could that be?). Finally, you can pump up the difficulty to Superhero and play through the campaign again, if you dare.
Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
The Classic series has not reached a definite conclusion, Originally developed for the NES, the original Mega Man series experienced graphical improvements in fourth and fifth generation installments. The series had no games developed for sixth generation consoles but returned in the seventh generation purposely sporting graphics, sound and gameplay similar to the original NES games to inspire a nostalgic look and feel, distributed as downloadable content instead of retail games like the previous installments.
Since the release of its first title in 1987, the FINAL FANTASY series has become a global phenomenon due to its cutting edge graphics technology, unique and distinctive world settings, and rich storylines. It has since sold over 142,000,000 copies (package/downloads). With 87 titles, the series was awarded the "most prolific role-playing game series" by the Guinness World Records in 2017.

In the noncanonical Ocarina of Time manga, author Himekawa Akira depicts Zelda requesting her true identity be sealed. Impa then actually transforms Zelda into a male, adding some controversy as to the exact nature of Zelda's Sheik transformation. Sheik also depicted as Zelda's alter-ego and a playable character in Hyrule Warriors and Hyrule Warriors Legends
After Hyrule is saved, Zelda uses the Ocarina of Time to send Link back to the past, allowing him to regain his lost seven years. This would however, turn out to be a mistake (like most of her other actions) as Link later lived a regretful life and became the Hero's Shade due Zelda's actions. He does however (as the Hero's Shade), help train his descendant (the Link in Twilight Princess) as well as move on after easing his regrets.
Zelda is featured on four stickers. Two of these are titled "Young Zelda," while the other two are simply titled "Zelda." The first two depict artwork of Zelda as a child from Ocarina of Time and The Minish Cap, and provide a +20 bonus to electric attacks and a +16 bonus to battering resistance, respectively. The latter can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf. The two stickers titled "Zelda" depict artwork of Zelda from A Link to the Past and of her adult form from Ocarina of Time. The former grants a +27 bonus to magic attacks and, like all other stickers that grant bonuses to magic attacks, can only be used by Zelda and Peach. The latter grants a +18 bonus to flame resistance and can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf.
Anyway, I'm nearing 30 and trying to have a bit of a lifestyle overhaul, i.e. working on my worst qualities. One thing that really annoys me about myself is that I start lots of things but never finish them, flitting between TV programmes, books and games like I have the attention span of a five year-old. So, I'm going back to the source, to the one game that has foxed me throughout my life despite the minimum player age being like 10 (!)... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time!
Down smash	Flame Blast	17% (clean), 14% (mid), 9% (late)	Mega Man plants both arm cannons into the ground, causing two vertical flaming pillars to erupt from the ground either side of him which launch the opponent upwards. It has quick startup, but notoriously long endlag that leaves it highly punishable if not landed. Immense knockback when hit with the first frames of the hitbox, which can KO starting at 60% when fully charged. It boasts incredible power, being the fourth-strongest down smash in SSB4, behind Lucario at maximum aura, Ganondorf, and Bowser Jr.. It is based on Flame Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.

I've been a Legend of Zelda fan forever. From the Game Cube's Ocarina of Time to the Wii's Skyward Sword, I've played them all, and each time I have the same reaction: how do these games keep getting better!? Eventually, you would think that the Zelda world, puzzles, and story would get repetitive and old, but with each iteration, Nintendo manages to change just enough to recapture your interest and awe in familiar characters and places. The game offers all that we love and expect from of a Zelda game while adding an entire new layer of complexity and customization. The map is entirely open-world, which differs from traditional, linear Zelda games, and everything is destructible and collectible. To match this, the inventory system feels much more similar to a standard open-world game as well. This gives the familiar settings of Hyrule, Faron, and Gerudo--to name a few--an entirely different flavor! Breath of the Wild also makes perfect use of the Switch engine--it has superb, Nintendo-style graphics that are just realistic enough to completely immerse yourself while not being overly realistic as to detract from the cartoon-ish nature of the series. This style, combined with the seamless animations and dynamic movement of the Switch create a truly beautiful and stunning world to explore. This game is basically a friendlier, happier, and more puzzle-centric Skyrim. Speaking of the dynamic movements, this game captures all of the best aspects of the old Wii games while doing away with the clunky, unrefined aspects. Different weapons require different swing patters while looking around is as simple as pointing and clicking, but without the click! If this style of gaming isn't for you, the game is just as easy and intuitive on the traditional Switch controller. Overall, this is an amazing game that has something for everyone--phenomenal graphics and game play, memorizing story lines and characters, thought-provoking puzzles, and action and adventure for the whole family to enjoy. Even though I am writing this review as part of a contest, I would HIGHLY recommend this game to anyone and everyone, young and old, Zelda newbies and veterans--it will not disappoint!
Early on in the timeline of the series, the original Zelda, while born as a Hylian, is the mortal incarnation of the Goddess Hylia.[18] Carrying on this divine blood, her female descendants are often named after her and are always the crown princess of Hyrule throughout its history.[3][19][20][21][22] Several princesses within the bloodline are also the possessor of the Triforce of Wisdom, imbued with the essence of the Goddess Nayru.[3][23][24] The essence of Nayru affords each Zelda divine wisdom, allowing them to discern the wisest decisions, especially in situations concerning the welfare of Hyrule. It grants them a myriad of mystical abilities, including the ability to heal others, though there is a possibility that this could also be an effect of their bloodline passing down Hylia's own powers and, later, the Light Force. Each incarnation of Zelda uses their powers to keep evil in check.

VS Race – Multiple human players race against each other on any course with customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. The mode also includes single-player VS races and CPU controlled players to compete in VS races as well since Mario Kart DS (except for Mario Kart 7). Super Circuit, however, features a Quick Run mode, which shares similarities with VS mode.
Though the Gerudo people had originally been against Urbosa becoming a Champion, after her death and Zelda's sealing of Ganon, they chose to remain loyal to Hyrule and as a result Riju and her bodyguard Buliara aided Link a century later out of respect for Lady Urbosa and Princess Zelda whom through Impa had tasked Link in freeing Vah Naboris. Though Riju had only heard of Zelda through legends, she respected her and the two even share similar backgrounds as Riju lost her mother forcing her to bear the burden of becoming Gerudo Chieftain. Riju even recognized the Sheikah Slate Link carried had belonged to Zelda previously showing she is well informed. Riju however like Zelda ultimately proves herself a capable leader despite her own doubts with Link's help. Presumably after Ganon's defeat, Zelda and Riju would work together to rebuild Hyrule and might even bond over their similar backgrounds.
More than 100 Shrines of Trials to discover and explore - Shrines dot the landscape, waiting to be discovered in any order you want. Search for them in various ways, and solve a variety of puzzles inside. The tasks you must perform in each Shrine varies, and you'll never expect the challenges you'll face until you enter. Some will involve realistic physics, and some will require you to harness the power of nature, including electricity, wind, fire, and more. Work your way through the traps and devices inside, utilizing your runes and think outside the box to earn special items and other rewards that will help you on your adventure.
As the series progressed, various other player characters have appeared, such as fellow Maverick Hunter Zero who was created by Dr. Wily of the Classic series, OVER-1, created jointly by Dr. Light and Dr. Cossack, and Axl, a Reploid with an adolescent personality who has the ability to shape-shift into other Reploids. Zero would later star in his own spin-off series, Mega Man Zero.
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[100] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]

Following Ganon's defeat, she assists Link in returning the Master Sword to its Sacred Pedestal to restore the seal on Ganon's Soul. When the darkness from Ganon's soul contained in the Pedestal leaks out to prevent Link from returning the sword, Zelda helps Link push the Sword into the pedestal, sealing away Ganon once again. The two then leave the Temple of the Sacred Sword together. Linkie's decision to follow her own path proves fortunate as Linkie later comes to Impa and the Hyrulean Forces aid while Link and Zelda are busy returning the Master Sword to its pedestal. After Linkie and Impa end up saving Hyrule in Link and Zelda's absence, Link and Zelda can be seen walking in Hyrule Field towards Hyrule Castle after restoring the seal.


As the last free descendant, Zelda uses telepathy to contact the descendant of the Knights of Hyrule, Link, to save her.[32] Despite his efforts in evacuating her from Hyrule Castle, Agahnim manages to capture Zelda and sacrifice her to the Dark World, breaking the seal between Hyrule and the Dark World.[80][81] While in the Dark World, Princess Zelda is held inside a crystal prison within Turtle Rock.[82] When Link frees her, she, along with the other maidens, breaks the seal surrounding Ganon's lair.[83]
In Twilight Princess, Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the deaths of herself and her people.[28] Afterward, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle. It is revealed that Zelda is unaffected by the veil of Twilight Zant casts upon Hyrule and does not become a spirit like all the other inhabitants of the kingdom. As the bearer of the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda may have been protected by its power.[23]

Just as there are multiple Links, there are multiple Zeldas throughout the series. Generally close in age to her respective Link, Zelda is most often portrayed as a child, but has been portrayed as a teenager or young adult on five occasions: in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][94] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][116] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[100][117] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][116][120] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[206]
Significant portions of this product require (i) an internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live or PlayStation Network account (if playing on an Xbox One or PlayStation®4, respectively). Multiplayer features of this product require (i) a persistent internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live Gold or PS Plus account (if playing on a Xbox One or PlayStation®4 respectively). Third-party accounts may require payment of additional fees.

All in all, and like in the original games, Mega Man excels at medium range, having little to no trouble to keep opponents at distance, though it can be risky for him to fight at close range. He has to use his fantastic projectiles at medium range and bait opponents so he can grab them to rack up damage, all while keeping his distance until the opponent is weak enough to finish it with one of his slow, yet powerful finishing moves.
The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.
The series' popularity has led to it having an impact in popular culture, with appearances and references in anime, TV, and film. The music in particular has garnered much attention, such as winning a place on the Classic FM Hall of Fame,[15] and a performance from synchronized swimmers at the 2004 Summery Olympics to "Liberi Fatali" from Final Fantasy VIII.
This game adds bikes, which I think adds nice diversity and feels very well balanced. The karts tend to be faster with better mini boosts from jumps and corners. The bikes can pop wheelies to get a mini boost on the straight stretches but are more vulnerable to being thrown off balance. My wife likes playing with karts and I like bikes, and I think she usually wins.

In Sonic Lost World, a DLC stage based on The Legend of Zelda series was released in March 2014, named "The Legend of Zelda Zone". While built around the core gameplay mechanics of Sonic Lost World, "The Legend of Zelda Zone" incorporates some elements from the Zelda series, including a heart-based vitality meter, rupee collection, and a miniature dungeon to explore.[116]
In addition, Nintendo celebrated the 25th anniversary of The Legend of Zelda game by releasing a Zelda game for all its current consoles in 2011: Link's Awakening in the 3DS's Virtual Console on June 7, Ocarina of Time 3D for the 3DS in mid-June, Four Swords Anniversary Edition[90] from September 28, 2011, to February 20, 2012, as a free DSiWare download and Skyward Sword for the Wii, which was released on November 18, 2011, in Europe; on November 20, 2011, in the United States; and on November 24, 2011, in Australia. A limited edition Zelda 25th anniversary 3DS was released on December 1, 2011, in Australia.[91]
The Final Fantasy series usually puts the player in control of multiple characters in a party, though there are exceptions. The player will build the party's strength by gradually acquiring new abilities and equipment to handle more powerful opponents. In many games this task extends beyond the main story with challenging superbosses and bonus dungeons serving as optional tests of skill. As a Japanese role-playing game, many installments—particularly the earlier installments in the main series, or the throwback spin-offs returning to old formulas—involve frequent use of menus to select items, skills and upgrades.
WatchMojo.com has frequently placed titles in the series in top ten lists, including top 10 JRPGs of all time*,[76] top 10 PSOne games*,[77] top ten PSOne RPGs*,[78] top ten PlayStation games of all time*,[79] and top ten Super Nintendo RPGs*.[80] The series held seven Guinness World Records in its Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, including "Most Games in an RPG Series", "Longest Development Period"* and "Fastest Selling Console RPG in a Single Day";[81] in the subsequent issue in 2009, two titles in the series featured in its top 50 console games*.[82]
Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[121][122] Like Final Fantasy VII, full motion video (FMV) sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series, although it still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques used in the previous two games.[122] Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2, and used the more powerful hardware to render graphics in real-time instead of using pre-rendered material to obtain a more dynamic look; the game features full 3D environments, rather than have 3D character models move about pre-rendered backgrounds. It is also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters.[19] This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[19][123]
The original Super Mario Kart has been listed among the greatest games ever made by a number of organizations. IGN, in listing it as the fifteenth-best game ever, called it "the original karting masterpiece."[16] It has also been credited with creating the kart racing subgenre of video gaming, as many developers have attempted to replicate its success, including Sega with Sonic Drift, Ubisoft with Street Racer, Konami with Konami Krazy Racers, Sony Computer Entertainment with Crash Team Racing, etc. Response to all these competing kart racers has been mixed: GameSpot stated that they tended to be bad,[17] and 1UP.com said that their producers tried to improve upon the Mario Kart formula without success.[18]
Capcom wanted a redesign in graphics and control as the Mega Man series moved from the NES to the SNES, prompting the creation of the Mega Man X series in 1993. Set in the future, this series follows the story of Mega Man's successor, Mega Man X, a new, advanced robot that has complete free will over his actions, thoughts and feelings. This character, often referred to as "X", is also a creation of Dr. Light, put into suspended animation and uncovered 100 years in the future by a researcher named Dr. Cain. The Mega Man X series features more detailed 16-bit graphics and greater freedom of movement. In the Mega Man X series, the characters grow in abilities and power as the game progresses.
The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original SNES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" original courses and 16 "retro" tracks drawn from previous titles, spread across four cups each. The four "nitro" cups ― the Mushroom Cup, Flower Cup, Star Cup, and Special Cup ― have been recurring cups throughout the entire series, while the "retro" cups from the more recent installments are the Shell Cup, Banana Cup, Leaf Cup, and Lightning Cup. As the player progresses through the cups, each is ostensibly more difficult than the one before it. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, namely Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.

Neutral aerial Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 2% (Mega Buster) Behaves identically to Mega Man's neutral attack, except Mega Man fires while jumping or falling in the air much like in his original games. The move has a sweetspot on the Mega Buster that has high base knockback and can serve as a surprise KO option when edge-guarding. Due to Mega Man's effective aerial movement, his neutral attack can be used as a very effective "wall" to deny approaches.
Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters

Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.
Three weeks after Wily found Ra Moon, the electromagnetic field begins to affect all the machinery and electronics around the world. Roll falls into a coma victim of the electromagnetic field, and Wily makes a worldwide broadcast saying to the world surrender for him in two weeks, or else he will shut down all machinery, which would effectively kill Roll and all the robots around the world, and without them, humans would die as well. Dr. Light quickly immunizes Mega Man and his brothers (the Robot Masters from Mega Man 1 : Cut Man, Elec Man, Ice Man, Fire Man, Bomb Man, and Guts Man) from the electromagnetic field, and sends them to stop Dr. Wily before it's too late. During the adventure, Mega Man and his comrades fought their way to the source of Electromagnetic field, Ra Moon, battling the Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and 3 in the process. In the end, Mega Man manages to destroy Ra Moon and the eletromagnetic field ceases, Roll recovers and all the machinery around the world starts functioning again.

The Mario Kart series has been referenced twice in the Paper Mario role-playing game series. Luigi references it in an "adventure" of his which he recounts between chapters of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where in the third of his stories, he states that he visited a location called "Circuit Break Island" where kart races are organized every day. Later, in Paper Mario: Color Splash, once all six Big Paint Stars have been retrieved, Luigi drives his kart on Rainbow Road to transport Mario to Bowser's castle to defeat him and restore peace to Prism Island; when Bowser (who has been transformed by black paint) is reverted to normal upon his defeat, he asks Mario if they have a kart race scheduled. Additionally, several stages based on Mario Kart have appeared in the Super Smash Bros. series: Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS features a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, as well as reusing the Mario Circuit stage from Brawl. Although not actually shown in the first Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the franchise (which at that time had been composed of just Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64) was alluded to in a promotional ad for the game in Nintendo Power, where it mentioned that Nintendo's famous cast had previously "raced go-karts" when announcing their new role in the fighting ring.
While driving, the player collects power-ups from item boxes placed in various points on the track. These power-ups allow the player to attack opponents, causing them to slow down or spin out of control; defend against such attacks; or gain boosts in speed. These include the series staple items, such as the Mushroom, Koopa shell projectiles, the Starman, and banana peels. There are also three new items: the Mega Mushroom, Thunder Cloud, and POW Block. The Mega Mushroom temporarily grows the player to an enormous size and allows them to flatten opposing karts, the POW Block causes all racers ahead of the user to spin out and drop their items if used (unless they dodge it by being mid-air or shaking the Wii Remote), and the Thunder Cloud gives the recipient a speed boost and off road capabilities, but the recipient has to collide with other racers to pass it onto them before the item delivers a shock, shrinking them to a tiny size.
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