Fortunately that's all I have to say about the bad stuff. The game itself is made to be appropriately challenging, all the new tracks have been very well designed and are fun. Basically if you've ever liked mario kart before, you'll continue to like it now. It's not much different. Blue shells appear to be more rare now, however there's also an item that can be used to prevent getting hit by a blue shell. The squid ink is possibly annoyingly more effective now.
The series has received criticism for many other aspects. Many have found the menu-based combat system and its use of random encounters to be a turnoff, or an outdated annoyance,[54][55] with IGN stating the the use of random encounters "need[ed] to change".[56] The series' minigames have been divisive and often come under fire as weaker aspects[57][58][59] (although minigames have received praise in other regard[60]). Finally, many direct sequels in the series have been poorly received and believed to be worse than the original titles.[61][62][63]

Various artbooks and source books have been released for many years in Japan, often including conceptual artwork, interviews with production staff, and background information on the storyline and concepts that are not present within the games themselves. One of the most well-known is the Rockman Perfect Memories sourcebook released in 2002 which first confirmed the presence of an alternate timeline (for Battle Network), as well as exactly where the Legends series fit into the fictional Mega Man universe.


Mega Man's role in the original story is to battle the mad scientist Dr. Wily and his ever-growing army of robots, and stop them from taking over Earth by using their own special abilities against them. Utilizing his special Mega Buster arm cannon, and his ability to copy a defeated robot's Special Weapon, Mega Man must travel the world and traverse harsh environments in order to bring Wily's menace to an end. With the help of his creator Dr. Light and his assorted robotic companions, Mega Man's eventual goal is to one day achieve "everlasting peace".
During a city battle against Bass, Mega Man is called away to investigate an island uncharted by any maps. After defeating a hermit crab-like robot, he finds Dr. Wily, who reveals that the island was his base before absconding with an orb of strange purple energy. Although unable to stop Wily's escape, Mega Man finds a badly damaged robot in a crater and takes it back to Dr. Light's lab. While the robot is brought in for repairs, Dr. Light informs Mega Man that Dr. Wily is at it again, with four brand-new Robot Masters attacking locations all over the globe.
I bought this game as a replacement for a Wii game my daughter wanted but I couldn't find. I never expected that I would LOVE it. I rarely play the Wii. It's pretty much a race game. There are several races with all kinds of courses, which go from easy to difficult. You get to choose your character, then the kind of vehicle you want to race in. You can choose to go for a test drive or race against a ghost (either of one of the wii developers or yourself). I've never played previous versions of this game, but they have the Gamecube version at my kids dentist's office and the wii edition of this game is about 1000 percent better in terms of graphics. While racing against other players, you can pick up different obstacles, like a banana, oil slick or bomb to throw at your opponents. Of course, they throw these things at you too, so you have to avoid them. You can also drive over ramps to give you a boost or pick up a tool to give you super speed or shield you from bombs, etc. I've played it with my kids and other adults and everybody always has a blast. I do like the wheel, but I can play the game fine without it, too. All in all it's a lot of fun, worth the extra money, and a great gift for someone who has a wii but you don't know what kind of game they want. I think this would be perfect for anybody, young and old.
The bosses themselves are largely familiar, and that was disappointing. You may be surprised to learn that there hasn’t been a Torch Man before, because he is a clone of Fire Man, Heat Man, Flame Man etc. (However, his level, which is loosely summer camp-themed, is pretty cute.) Fuse Man, Tundra Man, and Blast Man all filled familiar Mega Man niches. I did like Acid Man, whose level featured PH balance (!) challenges as water went from neutral to acidic. Conversely, Bounce Man’s level is a total disaster as it uses some shaky physics to bounce Mega Man around deadly balloon-filled gauntlets, robbing you of control. Finally, Block Man is just the best: His Egyptian-like palace is filled with hieroglyphs of him triumphing over Mega Man.
When awarding Link with the title of Royal Engineer during his Graduation Ceremony, Zelda slips him a note, warning him of the suspicious Chancellor Cole and instructing Link to take a hidden path and meet her in secret. Zelda requests Link's aid in investigating the mystery of the vanishing Spirit Tracks, which entails Link helping her sneak out of the castle. She then presents Link with a change of clothing, the Recruit Uniform, which will help Link blend in with the similarly dressed guards as they escape the castle. Upon exiting the castle, Link and Zelda enlist the aid of Alfonzo, Link's Master Engineer and mentor, to take them towards the Tower of Spirits. However, the tracks begin to vanish out from underneath their train before they witness the tower's levels being separated and then are stopped in their tracks by Chancellor Cole and Byrne. Byrne easily defeats Link and Alfonzo while Cole uses his magic to force Zelda's spirit out of her body.
While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.
Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
Zelda's body is eventually possessed by the resurrected Malladus, although Link frees it by firing a Light Arrow. Despite this, Zelda is unable to reenter her body, and just as Malladus is about to possess it again, Byrne uses his power to repel the Demon King, giving Zelda the strength to pray to her grandmother Tetra to reclaim her body.[128] In the final battle, Zelda, finally back in her own body, charges up her power to weaken the Demon King, which reveals a weak spot on the demon's back.[129] Like in previous games, Princess Zelda's role consists of shooting Light Arrows at Malladus's back from the Bow of Light.[130] Just as Link realizes that he cannot make the final blow to Malladus using the Lokomo Sword on his own, Princess Zelda rushes over to help the young hero, defeating the demon once and for all.[131] Anjean and the rest of the Lokomos depart to the heavens, entrusting Link and Zelda to watch over the land for them.[132] Link and Zelda are then seen holding hands as they witness the departure of the Lokomos.
If you're like me and grew up playing Mario Kart, you'll see this one blows all the others out of the water! The characters are so much more detailed and they've introduced new ones: King Boo, Bowser Jr, Dry Bones, & Inklings (Boy and Girl), as well as kept the older ones. The tracks have greater visibility and the overall resolution is incredibly clear. They've added new tracks, but kept some old ones which brings back childhood nostalgia. The carts now glow and look more futuristic. We can now carry 2 items at once, and the Item Boxes now come with 2 items! Nintendo has outdone themselves and I am excited to continue to share my love for this game with my niece and nephew! I am writing this review as part of a contest.
The next game, Link's Awakening, is the first Zelda for Nintendo's Game Boy handheld, and the first set outside Hyrule and to exclude Princess Zelda. It was released in 1993, and re-released, in full color, as a launch game for the Game Boy Color in 1998 as Link's Awakening DX. This re-release features additions such as an extra color-based dungeon and a photo shop that allows interaction with the Game Boy Printer.
Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)
But there was a lot to like about Skyward Sword, too. The game's impressionist painting aesthetic, its memorable Skyloft village, the fantastically over-the-top villain Ghirahim and scene-stealing Groose. Skyward Sword really embraced its placement as the first Zelda game chronologically, and it revelled in providing Easter eggs and lore-heavy moments to retroactively insert itself as a prequel to later instalments.
I didn't pay any attention when they announced MK8 last year. I knew I'd get it at some point, but there was no excitement. Then a few weeks ago I booted up my Wii U for the first time in months and was browsing the eStore. I watched the recent Nintendo Direct for MK8... after that it was all over, suddenly I was more hyped for new Mario Kart than I have been since 1997. I'm still not quite finished with Watch Dogs... partially because it's a long game with tons of content, partially because I keep taking breaks to play MK8. I can't wait to finally finish WD so I can give MK8 the undivided attention it deserves.

The next game, Link's Awakening, is the first Zelda for Nintendo's Game Boy handheld, and the first set outside Hyrule and to exclude Princess Zelda. It was released in 1993, and re-released, in full color, as a launch game for the Game Boy Color in 1998 as Link's Awakening DX. This re-release features additions such as an extra color-based dungeon and a photo shop that allows interaction with the Game Boy Printer.
Legacy Collection 1 and 2 also offer up timed Challenges, which are remixed Mega Man levels that provide a more substantial challenge. Players traverse through various parts of different levels, all while trying to beat a predetermined score. Mega Man levels are difficult, often rewarding a slow, methodical pace, but the Challenges are the complete opposite. Believe me, you’ll need all of your skills to complete them.
Mega Man next appeared in anime produced in Japan and based on spin-off series. First was MegaMan NT Warrior (2002-06), based on the Mega Man Battle Network video game series (both the anime and the video game series were known as Rockman.EXE in Japan). This was followed by Mega Man Star Force (2006-08), based on the video game series of the same name (both were known as Shooting Star Rockman in Japan).[citation needed]
Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.
However, Wily's frequent false repentances have become a constant frustration to Mega Man who appears to developing less patience with him, something that came to a head in the course of Mega Man 7 where he contemplated killing him, though ultimately decided against it. He further pointed out Wily's previous false repentances at the end of Mega Man 9, showing his diminishing patience, however he nonetheless assists him when he becomes ill in Mega Man 10.
Japanese figurines of Mario, Luigi, Peach, Toad, Yoshi, Wario, Donkey Kong, and Bowser are also available for purchase as well as for Mario Kart 64, figures of Mario, Luigi, Wario, Bowser, Donkey Kong, and Yoshi were made by Toybiz. There are also Sound Drops inspired by Mario Kart Wii with eight sounds from the game. A land-line telephone featuring Mario holding a lightning bolt while seated in his kart, has also been marketed.
Mario Kart 8 features 200cc mode, anti-gravity racing, introduces ATVs, uploading highlights to YouTube via Mario Kart TV (except on Switch), up to four local players in Grand Prix races, downloadable content, and is the first in the series to boast HD graphics. Introduces the Koopalings, Baby Rosalina, and Pink Gold Peach as new playable characters, and Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, Villager, Isabelle from Animal Crossing, and Link from The Legend of Zelda as new DLC playable characters.[5] The Nintendo Switch version, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, also adds the Inkling Girl and Inkling Boy from Splatoon as playable characters for the first time in the series, as well as a new battle mode, "Renegade Roundup", which plays similarly to a game of tag.
Nintendo 3DS Mario Kart 7, released in 2011 for the Nintendo 3DS, features optional 3D stereoscopic graphics and can be played using the console's gyroscope, which allows players to race in first-person and steer vehicles simply by turning the game system. Other features unseen in previous installments include the ability to build customizable vehicles with unlockable parts such as frames or tires; retractable hang gliders, which allow players to glide through the air, skipping over parts of the track or locating new routes/shortcuts that are otherwise inaccessible; fully submersible karts; and segments of tracks that are completely underwater. The game features 4 new characters: Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen. This is also the first Mario Kart game where Shy Guy can be played as without playing in multiplayer mode. The player can play online via Nintendo Network, participating in races or battles with up to seven other players, and exchange game data with other Nintendo 3DS consoles. Two of the new courses are set on Wuhu Island from the non-Mario game series Wii Fit.
Zelda's B button attacks lend themselves to this defensive style of play as well. Din's Fire is a long range setup attack allowing the player to control a guided fire "mine," which explodes upon release. Nayru's Love is a crystal shield which not only reflects projectiles, but damages nearby enemies and pushes them away. Farore's Wind is Zelda's third jump, a teleport move which can be directed and has enormous range, but leaves her somewhat vulnerable. If Zelda invokes the teleport while physically touching an enemy character, that character will take damage, but this is very hard to pull off in practice. Fans may remember her three magic attacks as the same ones Link acquired in Ocarina of Time, albeit with quite different applications. Instead of a fourth attack, her final command is the transformation to Sheik.

In some games, lines of coins are found on the courses, which if run over and collected, will increase a kart's top speed and can be used to unlock kart parts. Having coins also helps players when their kart is hit by another: instead of spinning and losing control, they lose a coin. Coins are also lost when karts are struck by power-ups or fall off the tracks. The series also features advanced maneuvers such as drifting (also called power sliding), which allows a kart to rapidly turn in a direction preventing the need to brake; and hopping, which helps a kart to avoid obstacles or off-road parts and sometimes can be used to execute tighter turns (the kart makes a short hop and turns in the air, speeding off in the new direction when it lands).

The Legend of Zelda, the first game of the series, was first released in Japan on February 21, 1986, on the Famicom Disk System.[56] A cartridge version, using battery-backed memory, was released in the United States on August 22, 1987, and Europe on November 27, 1987. The game features a "Second Quest," accessible either upon completing the game, or by registering one's name as "ZELDA" when starting a new quest. The Second Quest features different dungeons and item placement, and more difficult enemies.[57]
The next game released in the series was Four Swords Adventures for the GameCube, which was released in early 2004 in Japan and America, and January 2005 in Europe. Based on the handheld Four Swords, Four Swords Adventures was another deviation from previous Zelda gameplay, focusing on level-based and multiplayer gameplay. The game contains 24 levels and a map screen; there is no connecting overworld. For multiplayer features, each player must use a Game Boy Advance system linked to the GameCube via a Nintendo GameCube – Game Boy Advance link cable. The game features a single-player campaign, in which using a Game Boy Advance is optional.
Up aerial Air Shooter 3% (early hits), 2% (middle hits), 1% (later hits), 2% (latest hits) Mega Man fires a small tornado straight above him. It travels a fair distance, drawing in opponents who touch the tornado. It is based on Air Man's weapon from Mega Man 2. It can easily Star KO opponents even at low percentages, especially if the opponent tries to jump out of it. However, it will meteor smash Mega Man himself if it is reflected.
Jump up ↑ "The gods chose which of the kingdom's subjects would ascend to the new land, telling them to escape to the tallest mountains. They then flooded the world, sinking Ganondorf and Hyrule to the bottom of the ocean and sealing them away. Though the king was sealed along with his kingdom, the princess took a piece of the Triforce that had been broken in two by the king and managed to escape to the ocean's surface with several of her retainers." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 123)
Settings often contain elements based on real-world mythology, and the series features many allusions to religion. A notable example are ancient mythological creatures that function as summons, and have various different roles within the game lores. Espers from Final Fantasy VI are a magical race that once lived alongside humans until a war wiped most of them out. Aeons in Final Fantasy X are the physical realizations of the dreams of the fayth, and summoners use them to battle Sin. Many games featuring summoned monsters do not have them as a named race, or give them a key role within the lore, the summons being merely abilities to be used in battle.
Aside from the fairly excellent dungeons and sparse setpieces, one thing that I and I think a lot of my fellow players enjoyed was the camaraderie between your main boy-band cast. Hearing them all pipe up to comment on things from time to time was pretty neat, and helped establish each of their characters. Even if Noctis is a bit of a mopey emo brat, each one of them has something to like about them (Prompto keeps the mood light and also takes cool photos, Ignis is the rational caretaker backbone who makes beautiful food, Gladiolus gives everyone both physical and mental strength to pull through) and you do really find yourself getting kinda attached to these guys.
To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series in 2011, Nintendo commissioned an original symphony, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. The show was originally performed in the fall of 2011 in Los Angeles and consists of live performances of much of the music from the series.[215] It has since been scheduled for 18 shows so far throughout the United States and Canada.[215][216] Nintendo released a CD, The Legend of Zelda 25th Anniversary Special Orchestra CD. Featuring eight tracks from live performances of the symphony, the CD is included alongside the special edition of The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword for the Wii. Nintendo would later celebrate The Legend of Zelda's 30th anniversary with an album which was released in Japan in February 2017.[217]
Realizing that it would be very difficult for the armies to stop Wily, Dr. Light knew something had to be done. Rock, having a strong sense of justice, volunteered to be converted from his current state as a lab assistant into a fighting robot, or rather, a super fighting robot. Thus, on May 25,[10] he became known as "Mega Man" (Rockman in Japan).
Additionally, it is revealed that Kass' teacher, who was a Sheikah who served as the Royal Family's court poet, once aided Princess Zelda in surveying the Shrines located throughout Hyrule. Kass's teacher had developed an unrequited love for Zelda, before coming to believe she had feelings for Link though despite this the poet believed Link would return and entrusted Kass with the task of guiding Link to the Shrines.[1] after freeing all four Guardians, Link learns of the Final Trial and assists Kass in completing his mentor's unfinished work, The Champions' Ballad. Afterwards, Kass gives Link the Picture of the Champions, a printed Sheikah Slate photo taken by Purah during the Champions' inauguration ceremony which had been his mentor's prized possession.
^ Nintendo (November 18, 2011). The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. Wii. Nintendo. Demise: I will rise again. Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero... They are eternally bound to this curse. An incarnation of my hatred shall ever follow your kind, dooming them to wander a blood-soaked sea of darkness for all time!
Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.

The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.

The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.


In Breath of the Wild, Impa is one of Princess Zelda's closest allies along with her elder sister Purah, and Robbie. Purah herself states this to Link, telling him to talk to Impa about the pictures which Zelda had taken 100 years ago. Zelda was the one who also told Impa to give Link her message to "Free the Divine Beasts", showing that she trusted Impa immensely.
Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)
1UP.com described Mega Man as "Capcom's ill-treated mascot", and "one of the most incongruous characters of all time", saying "it wouldn't be completely incorrect to assume that the popularity of the series has almost nothing to do with Mega Man himself", but with "his rivals, his enemies, and their abilities."[60] IGN agreed with his dependency on support characters, saying Zero is "cooler than Mega Man".[61] Den of Geek listed Mega Man's incarnation from Street Fighter X Tekken as the 15th best cameo in fighting game history due to how it represented Capcom's lack of interest in featuring other games as of 2012, as well as the apparent self-mockery of it due to Mega Man's poor characterization.[62] Destructoid described this Mega Man as "legit" stating it was "an unexpected and interesting creative decision by [Capcom] using this version of Mega Man to represent them in what may be one of their biggest games of 2012".[63]
Link rescues Zelda and takes her into the Sanctuary, where she remains under the protection of the Loyal Sage for part of the game. After Link retrieves the Master Sword from the Lost Woods, Zelda is kidnapped by Agahnim's henchmen and sent to the Dark World in his final ritual, breaking the seal. She is not seen again until she is rescued by Link from Turtle Rock. Saving her and the other six maidens opens the entrance to Ganon's Tower, the final dungeon of the game. Zelda is last seen together with her revived father in the end credits sequence. It is hinted in the Oracle games and A Link Between Worlds that this Zelda became intimate with Link later on.
Some time later, Dr. Wily claims to have changed and teams up with Dr. Light to create a giant peacekeeping robot called Gamma. However, the new Robot Masters created to mine the Energy Elements needed for Gamma's construction have gone out of control. Mega Man goes after them, meeting his brother, Proto Man (under the alias Break Man in this game, until the ending) along the way. Mega Man soon retrieves the crystals, but returns to discover that Dr. Wily has stolen Gamma and plans on using it to take over the world.
Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)

Legacy Collection 1 and 2 also offer up timed Challenges, which are remixed Mega Man levels that provide a more substantial challenge. Players traverse through various parts of different levels, all while trying to beat a predetermined score. Mega Man levels are difficult, often rewarding a slow, methodical pace, but the Challenges are the complete opposite. Believe me, you’ll need all of your skills to complete them.


As it turns out, though, Square Enix has now reportedly revealed a later-than-expected physical release on Switch. The news comes from the folks at NintendoSoup, who mention that "there will be no physical release in North America, Europe, and Japan", with the physical copy instead being released exclusively in Southeast Asia. The situation gets more and more strange every time we hear about it.

Mega Man X was ranked number 58 in Nintendo Power's "100 Best Nintendo Games of All Time" in its 100th issue in September 1997, number 103 in the publication's "Top 200 Games" list for its 200th issue in February 2006, and the 11th best SNES game of all time in its August 2008 issue.[30][31][32] Both GamesRadar and ScrewAttack listed Mega Man X as the eighth best game in the SNES library.[33][34] GamePro similarly listed it as the eighth greatest 16-bit video game.[35] Game Informer considered it the 120th best game of all time in its own 200th issue in December 2009.[36] IGN named it the twelfth-best on its own top 100 SNES games list in 2011.[37]
Distant Worlds IV boasts one of the strongest track lists of any of our recordings with brilliant new classics from the latest game release FINAL FANTASY XV: APOCALYPSIS NOCTIS and Somnus, new orchestral arrangements from FINAL FANTASY VII: Cosmo Canyon and JENOVA COMPLETE, FINAL FANTASY VIII: The Oath and FINAL FANTASY IX: Festival of the Hunt, and Nobuo Uematsu’s FINAL FANTASY XIV: Dragonsong featuring the inimitable voice of Susan Calloway.

The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.


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The Legends series concluded with only two main games and a spin-off starring mainstay antagonist Tron Bonne before being discontinued. Unlike Battle Network and Zero, the final game in the series does not resolve the storyline. A continuation to the Legends series has become an oft-requested game among many Capcom and Mega Man fans. A third game was once under development for the Nintendo 3DS, but on July 17, 2011, Capcom cancelled the project saying it did not meet certain requirements. This decision was met with criticism from fans and gaming news outlets.[3][4]

From the beginning Uematsu was given creative freedom, though the series' creator Hironobu Sakaguchi would request specific set-pieces to fit themes, and early on there were specific notes Uematsu was unable to use due to hardware limitations.[18] From Final Fantasy IV onwards, he had more freedom of instrumentation. For "One-Winged Angel", the Final Fantasy VII final boss theme and the series' first vocalized theme, Uematsu combined both rock and orchestral influences having had no prior training in orchestra conduction.[18]


Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
Dr. Wily having finally managed to modify the time machine, discovers that the time machine could now only travel into the future and back, not into the past. Dr. Wily modified his plan and decided instead to spy on Mega Man’s future. Travelling approximately 37.426 years into the future (as stated in the American manual), Wily found that the future was peaceful, as his future self had reformed and Mega Man no longer needing weapons, had been reset back into a peaceful household robot. Recognizing this chance, Wily convinces his future self to abduct the now defenseless Mega Man. Dr. Wily then proceeds to capture Mega Man, and modifies him into the fighting robot Quint, reprogramming him to make him fight against the Mega Man of the present.[11][12]
When transitioning to the next generation of video game consoles, the now-merged Square Enix developed Final Fantasy XIII for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. It was developed using Crystal Tools, a proprietary engine built to develop games for the consoles. As the first high definition title, it allowed for a major improvement in graphics with many reviewers citing its visuals as a strong point.[25][26][27] The original release of Final Fantasy XIV was also developed using Crystal Tools, though its subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, was developed using different technology.
The game introduces the double gear system. Using the shoulder buttons the player is able to activate either the power gear or the speed gear. The power gear makes your shots more powerful and the speed gear slows down enemies. You can only use each of these temporarily, because they'll over heat if you leave them active for too long. If this happens the double gear will will have to recharge before it can be used again. The game is perfectly designed so that you could make do without them, but it will push you to use these systems a lot. Some enemies are easier to dispatch with the speed gear, and most boss fights are made easier with the power gear. It seems gimmicky at first and upon first playing the game you'll often forget you have them, but once you settle in you'll find yourself using these systems more and more as you encounter hazards in levels that will encourage you to do so. There's another added benefit of the double gear system. When critically low on health you can press both shoulders at the same time to activate both the speed gear and power gear simultaneously. It's mostly a last ditch effort when low on health, and you can't actually turn this off, meaning your double gear will have to recharge without fail after its use, but it can help you out in a moment of desperation.
Every time a new Zelda game comes around, I can’t wait to explore its dungeons. There’s just something about that feeling of progression– collecting keys, opening chests, solving puzzles, tackling larger-than-life bosses– that speaks to me. It’s certainly no coincidence that my favorite Zelda entries are those with the strongest dungeons. Indeed, for many fans, these sections have been an integral part of the series. That said, not every dungeon receives a ton of love. From Ocarina of Time’s Water…

Some of Princess Zelda's physical abilities are demonstrated in games such as The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess and Spirit Tracks. In The Wind Waker, Princess Zelda aids Link in battling Ganondorf by borrowing the young hero's bow and using it to fire Light Arrows at the King of the Gerudo.[31] This skill is again portrayed in the final battle of Twilight Princess, where the princess yet again uses a bow and Light Arrows to strike Ganondorf while accompanying Link on his horse,[38] and once more in the final battle against Malladus in Spirit Tracks. In one scene of Twilight Princess, Princess Zelda is seen wielding a sword, although it is unknown if she possesses any true sword skills.


Outside of battles the player can explore the field for items, dialog with non-player characters, and for trading in gil for items and gear. In games featuring instanced random encounters, the party will encounter an enemy randomly while exploring dangerous areas (though abilities to reduce the encounter rate can be learned), while games with free-roaming enemies have enemies appear in the dangerous areas for the player to engage or avoid.
After the events of Mega Man II, Dr. Wily took control of an off-shore oil platform with some of his powerful Robot Masters. Once again, Dr. Light sends Mega Man to investigate and stop them before it gets out of hand. Mega Man takes down the first four Robot Masters and makes his way to the Wily Castle, where he discovers that four more Robot Masters await him. After defeating them, he encounters a new Mega Man Killer named Punk in the Wily Station, whose Screw Crusher delivers a crushing blow to its opponents. However, Mega Man promptly defeats Punk and defeats Wily with Punk's own weapon.
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