Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]

The story begins with Zelda awakening from a recurring nightmare, which she and Impa believe to be a sign of troubled times approaching. While visiting the training barracks of Hyrule Castle, she sees a particularly talented recruit that seems to be different from the others - however, her attention is quickly directed to a massive army of monsters approaching the castle. Zelda personally leads the defense of her castle, soon joined by Impa and Link, the recruit from earlier who had just been revealed as the reincarnation of the legendary hero by his possession of the Triforce of Courage. With the battle seemingly under control, Zelda returned to Hyrule Castle to coordinate her forces, only to be ambushed by Wizzro while her army was distracted by King Dodongo.


Dr. Wily having finally managed to modify the time machine, discovers that the time machine could now only travel into the future and back, not into the past. Dr. Wily modified his plan and decided instead to spy on Mega Man’s future. Travelling approximately 37.426 years into the future (as stated in the American manual), Wily found that the future was peaceful, as his future self had reformed and Mega Man no longer needing weapons, had been reset back into a peaceful household robot. Recognizing this chance, Wily convinces his future self to abduct the now defenseless Mega Man. Dr. Wily then proceeds to capture Mega Man, and modifies him into the fighting robot Quint, reprogramming him to make him fight against the Mega Man of the present.[11][12]
Mario and his friends are back and ready to race once again in Mario Kart Wii! Experience new tracks, enhanced Wii graphics, extraordinary gameplay and much more! Place first in Grand Prix circuits or clear skill-based missions to open up increasingly difficult and thrilling circuits. Players can have multiplayer races on any open courses or battle in arenas. Also included with Mario Kart Wii is the Wii Wheel! Now you can feel like your Mario and steering to avoid obstacles and doing incredible stunts - in the safety of your home of course.

However, Wily's frequent false repentances have become a constant frustration to Mega Man who appears to developing less patience with him, something that came to a head in the course of Mega Man 7 where he contemplated killing him, though ultimately decided against it. He further pointed out Wily's previous false repentances at the end of Mega Man 9, showing his diminishing patience, however he nonetheless assists him when he becomes ill in Mega Man 10.


Forward smash Charge Shot 11.5%-19.5% Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.

A sequel (of sorts) to the Legacy Collection has been announced, which, continuing where the first left off, consists of Mega Man series games 7, 8, 9, and 10. This is a bit more of a smorgasbord, though, since unlike the NES titles from the previous collection, these span at least three different systems. It’s not a simple matter of tossing an NES emulator on there and calling it good. And considering I’m not sure whether MM9 and MM10 used an emulator or a brand new custom engine, it’s possible they’ll find themselves emulating an emulator. Ah, fun times are ahead indeed.
Jump up ↑ "You are already leaving this land of Hyrule, aren't you? Even though it was only a short time, I feel like I've known you forever. I'll never forget the days we spent together in Hyrule... And I believe in my heart that a day will come when I shall meet you again... Until that day comes, please... Take this..." — Princess Zelda (Majora's Mask)
The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]
Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
Because of the limitations of the LCD screen, there is no elaborate ending sequence. When the eighth dragon has been defeated, Princess Zelda walks out of her prison and right up to Link (just as she does in The Adventure of Link) as if to embrace him, but the animation ends just before they meet, leaving the end result up to the player's imagination.
In Legends and the Definitive Edition, Tetra is transported to Hyrule from the Era of the Great Sea in another dimension by a mysterious dark force that originate from her world. Link, Proxi, and the Hyrulean Forces are sent to investigate the recent warping of timespace by Impa and Zelda, as Impa convinces Zelda to remain at Hyrule Castle as Hyrule is still recovering from the battle with Ganon. Link and Proxi find Tetra defending Windfall Island from the Monster Forces lead by Boss Blin and join forces with Zelda's pirate counterpart though are unaware she is an incarnation of the Princess of Hyrule from another dimension. Boss Blin ends up driving Tetra's old adversary Helmaroc King whom Tetra despises from Forsaken Fortress causing it to attack the Hyrulean and Monster Forces while searching for a new place to roost forcing Tetra and the Hyrulean Forces to drive it away before taking on the Monster Forces and Boss Blin. However after Boss Blin is defeated Link and Proxi notice Helmaroc King kidnap Tetra once more as it had done during the Era of the Great Sea and chase after it to Gerudo Desert where the Monster Forces are guarding Gates of Souls. Lana arrives searching for Cia and Link informs her Tetra is an ally after she escapes from a sleeping Helmaroc King while it was roosting in the Arbiter's Grounds. After closing the Gates the Monster Forces join forces with Helmaroc King as it tries to retrieve Tetra but Tetra and the Hyrulean Forces defeat them. Tetra's ancestor King Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule appears afterwards and reveals the entity that stole Lana's Triforce of Power is responsible for Cia's disappearance after her defeat and the recent warping of timespace. He joins forces with Tetra and the Hyrulean Forces to save Cia who has been imprisoned in the Temple of Souls. There they find her doppleganger Dark Cia draining Cia's magic. They rescue her causing Cia to have a change of heart after having been saved by her former enemies. Cia joins forces with them to defeat Dark Cia. After Dark Cia's defeated Cia regains her magic and reveals the one responsible for creating Dark Cia and stealing the Triforce of Power is Phantom Ganon the artificial phantom of Ganondorf from the Era of the Great Sea. The Hyrulean Forces then travel to Phantom Ganon's stronghold in the merged Wind and Earth Temples. Tetra, King Daphnes, Link, Lana, and Cia manage to combine their power to weaken Phantom Ganon allowing the Hyrulean Forces to defeat him.
K'Nex produced sets with tracks from the game and figures of Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, and Bowser in karts and bikes. These have been released to promote Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7, and Mario Kart 8. McDonald's released an eight-character set of Happy Meal toys based on Mario Kart 8, where the characters' karts were customizable with stickers. Nintendo itself has also offered Mario Kart-related merchandise, such as a soundtrack for Mario Kart 64 offered by mail; and varying pieces of merchandise through the Club Nintendo customer rewards program, such as a Mario Kart Wii-themed stopwatch, gold trophies modeled after those in Mario Kart 7, and a CD featuring the soundtrack of Mario Kart 8.
None of the Robot Master weapons from Mega Man 5, Mega Man 10, Mega Man & Bass, or Mega Man V are included in Mega Man's arsenal, even though there is at least one weapon used from every other Mega Man game from 1-9, although the Black Hole Bomb from Mega Man 9 appears briefly during his Final Smash. Beat from Mega Man 5 also appears as a custom up special move.
The game is maybe 10-15% story missions, and the rest mostly filler sidequests. The story missions are fairly enjoyable, and the dungeons especially are probably the high points for the game in general (actual plot happening, interesting/funny chatter, unique enemies, often very beautiful scenery - the one in the Vesperwood is my favorite so far). It's a shame that there aren't more important sidequests. Previous entries in the FF series had more benefits from sidequests than just extra gil/consumables or a decent new weapon. There was more lore, more character-building.. but the majority of these sidequests just feel like busywork.
The Legend of Zelda series has received outstanding levels of acclaim from critics and the public. Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, Skyward Sword, and Breath of the Wild have each received a perfect 40/40 score (10/10 by four reviewers) by Japanese Famitsu magazine,[175][176] making Zelda one of the few series with multiple perfect scores. Ocarina of Time was even listed by Guinness World Records as the highest-rated video game in history, citing its Metacritic score of 99 out of 100.[177] Computer and Video Games awarded The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess a score of 10/10.[178][179] A Link to the Past has won Gold Award from Electronic Gaming Monthly. In Nintendo Power's Top 200 countdown in 2004, Ocarina of Time took first place, and seven other Zelda games placed in the top 40.[180] Twilight Princess was named Game of the Year by X-Play, GameTrailers, 1UP, Electronic Gaming Monthly, Spacey Awards, Game Informer, GameSpy, Nintendo Power, IGN, and many other websites. The editors of review aggregator websites GameRankings, IGN and Metacritic have all given Ocarina of Time their highest aggregate scores.[181] Game Informer has awarded The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword, A Link Between Worlds and Breath of the Wild with scores of 10/10. Phantom Hourglass was named DS Game of the Year by IGN and GameSpy.[182][183] Airing December 10, 2011, Spike TV's annual Video Game Awards gave the series the first ever "Hall of Fame Award", which Miyamoto accepted in person.[184] Ocarina of Time and its use of melodic themes to identify different game regions has been called a reverse of Richard Wagner's use of leitmotifs to identify characters and themes.[185] Ocarina of Time was so well received that sales increased for real ocarinas.[186] IGN praised the music of Majora's Mask for its brilliance despite its heavy use of MIDI. It has been ranked the seventh-greatest game by Electronic Gaming Monthly, whereas Ocarina of Time was ranked eighth.[187][188] The series won GameFAQs Best Series Ever competition.[189]
Valiant Comics released a short series of comics featuring characters and settings from the Zelda cartoon as part of their Nintendo Comics System line. Manga adaptations of many entries in the series, including A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Four Swords Adventures, The Minish Cap, and Phantom Hourglass, have been produced under license from Nintendo, mostly in Japan. These cartoons are usually not involved with the chronology of the actual games.[clarification needed]
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
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