Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)
In the game's story mode, "The Subspace Emissary", Zelda is watching a match between Mario and Kirby alongside Princess Peach. When the flying battleship Halberd appears over the stadium, both princesses join Mario and Kirby in fighting off the enemies that emerge from it. After the fight, Mario is blown out of the stadium, and Zelda and Peach are captured by Petey Piranha, one of Mario's enemies. Kirby fights Petey to rescue the princesses, but can only save one of them (the player can choose which one). The other princess is turned into a trophy by Wario, and Kirby escapes with the rescued princess as the entire stadium is pulled into Subspace by a Subspace Bomb.

Mega Man 11 isn't perfect. It isn't a severely flawed game, but some of its flaws can really stand out. For the most part the level design is really good. There are many moments that encourage players to use the double gear system and the levels are lengthy enough that they can keep you busy. The difficulty of some levels, however, is definitely going to get to some players. For the most part any screw ups are your own, but there's a lot of trial and error in learning some of the levels, and even worse is that Mega Man 11 has a limited life count. If you get a game over it's back to the beginning of a level for you. The levels put up a great challenge, but their length and (in some levels) hazards can make starting the entire thing over again feel like a test in frustration. Even Mega Man veterans will have to slow down and really take time to learn these levels.
Mario Kart 64 is a go-kart racing game released for the Nintendo 64 gaming console system back in 1996. Mario Kart 64 is the second game in the series and the first game to feature a full 3D gameplay. The game has an assortment of powerups and characters with a cool Mario vibe. Each character has their own unique traits and set of attributes that will affect the gameplay. Race through different tracks and avoid the natural hazards and try to cross the finish line first! Good luck!
The first three titles where developed on the 8bit Nintendo Entertainment System while the next three were developed on the 16bit Super Nintendo Entertainment System. These games were two-dimensional and used sprites to depict characters and enemies on screen. The enemies in battle would have more detailed sprites that more closely resembled their artwork, but far fewer animations. The character sprites had several frames of animations, as well as different sprites based on their various statuses or weapons equipped, but were less detailed. Field sprites were less detailed than battle sprites. Though the SNES allowed games to have greater graphics and use higher-quality music with more instrumentation, the games were mostly the same format and similarly basic.
The player can explore dungeons where enemies are fought and treasures and items can be found. Enemies tend to be more numerous in dungeons, and there is often a boss at the end. Other areas are safe havens, notably towns, which contain shops for the party to buy new items and equipment, and often an inn to rest at and fully restore HP and MP. Many games feature a world map used to traverse on foot or via airships, chocobos or other vehicles. World maps have random encounters and are crossed to reach other points of interest in the world, often with mountains and oceans and other impassable objects placed to ward off areas the player is not meant to visit yet; by end game players usually acquire a vehicle that allows exploration of every nook of the world.

Final Fantasy[a] is a science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The series has also branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching out in other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.

You can use the Toy-Con Motorbike from your Nintendo Labo: Variety Kit and the Toy-Con Car, Pedal, and Key from your Nintendo Labo: Vehicle Kit to control your in-game vehicle in the Mario Kart™ 8 Deluxe game. Enjoy every game mode and every vehicle type with these immersive, interactive controller options that make you feel like you’re really in the driver’s seat.
In Skyward Sword, the Triforce was sought by a demon king named Demise,[22] and after a long battle, Demise was sealed away within the Temple of the goddess Hylia, guardian of the Triforce.[18][23] Hylia, placing the Hylians on a floating island (called Skyloft) in the sky to protect them, orchestrated a means to stop the demon from escaping: creating the Goddess Sword (later becoming the Master Sword) for her chosen hero[24] and discarding her divinity to be reborn among the people of Skyloft.[25] In time, Zelda and Link (the reborn Hylia and her predestined warrior), enacted the goddess' plan and Demise was destroyed. However, Demise vowed that his rage would be reborn and forever plague those descended from Link and Zelda.[26] That prophecy came to fruition in Ocarina of Time, when Ganondorf's attempt to get the Triforce scattered it with him gaining the Triforce of Power. The Triforce of Wisdom ended up with the Hylian princesses descended from Zelda, each named after her, while the Triforce of Courage is passed to a youth named Link across generations. While the Triforces of Power and Wisdom have been part of the series since the original The Legend of Zelda, it was only in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link that the Triforce of Courage was first introduced, being obtained by Link at the end of his quest. The Triforce, or even a piece of it, is not always distributed as a whole. Such as in The Wind Waker, Link must find all the pieces (called Triforce Shards) of the Triforce of Courage before he can return to Hyrule. Even in the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda breaks her Triforce of Wisdom into 8 pieces for Link to find, before she was captured by Ganon.
At the Temple of Hylia, when Zelda states she must seal herself to keep Demise in place, she sheds tears of sadness and states before all this, she was happy just being with Link on Skyloft, demonstrating a deep level of feelings for her childhood friend. Link desperately tries to stop her and when she is sealed, Link lowers his head in sadness, showing his deep feelings for her. Once Link releases Zelda from her sealed state, he runs up and catches her from falling. They both hug and walk out smiling at each other, holding hands, before Ghirahim ruins the tender moment. During the ending, Zelda asks what Link will do now. Link sweetly smiles at her while their Loftwings fly off toward the sky, implying that he chose to stay on the Surface to live with Zelda.
Custom 2 Plant Barrier 3% (circling), 4.2% (thrown) Mega Man summons flower petal-shaped units that orbit around him. The petals are more durable than the Leaf Shield, as they do not disappear when hit and deal slightly more damage when thrown, but they move slightly slower and have less range when thrown. The move is based on Plant Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
The Wind Waker is parallel, and takes place in the other timeline branch, more than a century after the adult era of Ocarina of Time.[45][46] Phantom Hourglass is a continuation of the story from The Wind Waker,[47] and is followed by Spirit Tracks, which is set about 100 years later on a supercontinent far away from the setting of The Wind Waker.[48] At the time of its release, Four Swords for the Game Boy Advance was considered the oldest tale in the series' chronology, with Four Swords Adventures set sometime after its events.[49] The Minish Cap precedes the two games, telling of the origins of villain Vaati and the creation of the Four Sword.[50] A Link Between Worlds takes place six generations after Link to the Past. Important events that occur in the game include the Triforce being reunited, and Ganon being resurrected.[51]
While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.
While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.

Following Ganon's defeat and while Princess Zelda and Link had left to return the Master Sword to its pedestal, the battle weary Hyrulean Soldiers lead by Impa were confronted by the remnants of Ganondorf's army of monsters which took advantage of the situation to attack the ruins of Hyrule Castle. However despite her absence and their exhaustion, the soldiers valiantly defended the kingdom, though Impa later had them retreat in order to rest while she and the newly arrived Linkle engaged the monsters, though they vowed to return once they had regained their strength. True to their word, the soldiers returned to the battlefield and assisted Impa and Linkle by confronting the lesser monsters, allowing Impa and Linkle focused on defeating Dark King Dodongo. The Hyrulean Forces eventually prevailed over the Monster Forces just as their princess was return to the castle with Link.


Forward smash Charge Shot 11.5%-19.5% Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.

The most well-known series is produced by Hitoshi Ariga (who went on to provide character designs and artwork for future official Capcom releases, including the Super Famicom game Mega Man and Bass). The series began with Rockman Remix, followed with Rockman Megamix, and is currently being serialized as Rockman Gigamix. The Megamix portion of the series would eventually be brought to North American shores thanks to UDON Entertainment Corporation, also responsible for the localization of the short Mega Man ZX manga by Shin Ogino. In the original Mega Man series, Dr. Light was known as Dr. Right, so many of his robots featured in Ariga's comic have "R"s in their designs. UDON did not alter this detail in the English version of Mega Man Megamix.[11]

Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
Zelda is portrayed as a young girl or beautiful young woman, usually with blonde hair. In Twilight Princess, however (and therefore in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, as well as Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U, in which her appearance is based on that of Twilight Princess), she is depicted as a brunette. She also has light brown hair in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (though she is depicted as being blonde in artwork), and auburn hair in The Adventure of Link.

Jump up ↑ "When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand... Together with the Hero of Time, the awakened ones will bind the evil and return the light of peace to the world..." — Sheik (Ocarina of Time)
Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward.[101] Tetsuya Nomura was chosen to replace Amano because Nomura's designs were more adaptable to 3D graphics. He worked with the series from Final Fantasy VII through Final Fantasy X;[74][101] for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[111] Nomura is also the character designer of the Kingdom Hearts series, Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy.[112] Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI, and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and Final Fantasy XII.[40][113]
Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]

Forward smash Charge Shot 11.5%-19.5% Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.
The rescued princess journeys alongside Kirby until she is attacked and turned into a trophy by Bowser, who uses a swarm of Shadow Bugs to create a clone of the princess. If the princess is Zelda, the clone tries to attack Link and Yoshi, but is intercepted and destroyed by Mario and Kid Icarus hero Pit. Link notices the battle just in time to see what appears to be Zelda's trophy dissolve into nothing, and attacks Mario and Pit in a rage.
The majority of the music in the series—including the main recurring themes, and the full official soundtracks for the first ten games in the main series—was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, and has been praised as one of the greatest aspects of the series.[15][16][17] The music has had a broad musical palette, taking influences from classical symphonic music, heavy metal and techno-electronica.

With the success of these two test-type robots, Light designed and built six industrial robots, mainly to be used in the construction and maintenance of public works. These robots were Cut Man, a timber felling robot; Guts Man, a construction robot; Ice Man, a robot designed for exploration in extreme freezing temperatures; Bomb Man, a land reclamation robot; Fire Man, designed for waste management; and Elec Man, designed to oversee and control atomic energy power plants. (Mega Man Powered Up introduced two more Robot Masters: Time Man, a time researcher robot, and Oil Man, an oil maintenance robot.) Each of these robots had full use of a human-like intelligence and reasoning potential. However, little did Dr. Light know that all of these robots, including the missing Proto Man, would later serve as the key to unlocking Rock's destiny.
Additionally, Zelda seems to recognize Link's name upon their first meeting.[6] This could be attributed to her prophetic abilities, although the boy in her dreams seemed to be a largely abstract figure, with no defining traits aside from the presence of a guardian Fairy and a Spiritual Stone. This line of dialogue has often been regarded as a sign that the two have met before, although this could only have occurred when Link was a baby per the Deku Tree Sprout's account of Link's coming to Kokiri Forest. It is also worth noting that while the King of Hyrule is clearly identified as Zelda's father, no mention is made of a Queen. Meanwhile, Link's mother is stated to have died shortly after reaching the forest, but no information is given concerning his father. Given these facts, it is possible that Zelda and Link share the same parents, making them siblings.

Custom 1 Tornado Hold 2% (center), 1% (sides) Drops a spinning fan onto the ground that creates a tornado and pushes anyone caught in it upwards, dealing multiple hits. It can be also used to combo into the Flame Sword, Slash Claw or Air Shooter. If used in mid-air, it causes the fan to fall as it pushes Mega Man up, giving it better offensive potential but slightly less vertical distance than the Rush Coil. It is based on Tengu Man's weapon from Mega Man 8.


Enemies are weak to at least one weapon; for instance, Fire Man will take more damage from Ice Man's weapon than from other weapons. This concept draws inspiration from rock-paper-scissors. Robot Master levels can generally be completed in any order, resulting in a strategic hallmark of the series: determining the best order to defeat bosses and earn weapons. Sequels of Mega Man games contain new enemies alongside familiar ones, new bosses and weapons, and perhaps new gadgets. Later installments of the game give the player the option of commanding other player characters with different abilities, such as Proto Man, Duo, and Bass.
Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.

In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]
Several individual Final Fantasy games have garnered extra attention; some for their positive reception and others for their negative reception. Final Fantasy VII topped GamePro's "26 Best RPGs of All Time" list,[169] as well as GameFAQs "Best Game Ever" audience polls in 2004 and 2005.[170][171] Despite the success of Final Fantasy VII, it is sometimes criticized as being overrated. In 2003, GameSpy listed it as the seventh most overrated game of all time, while IGN presented views from both sides.[172][173] Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII shipped 392,000 units in its first week of release, but received review scores that were much lower than that of other Final Fantasy games.[174][175][176] A delayed, negative review after the Japanese release of Dirge of Cerberus from Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu hinted at a controversy between the magazine and Square Enix.[177] Though Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within was praised for its visuals, the plot was criticized and the film was considered a box office bomb.[45][46][47][178] Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles for the GameCube received overall positive review scores, but reviews stated that the use of Game Boy Advances as controllers was a big detractor.[116][179] The predominantly negative reception of the original version of Final Fantasy XIV caused then-president Yoichi Wada to issue an official apology during a Tokyo press conference, stating that the brand had been "greatly damaged" by the game's reception.[180]
In addition to Hyrule Warriors incarnation of Zelda, Tetra appears as a playable character in Hyrule Warriors Legends (Tetra also appears in the original Hyrule Warriors via the download code that comes with Hyrule Warriors Legends). Tetra fights using Cutlass and magic-infused flintlock pistols, befitting her status as a swashbuckling pirate captain. During certain attacks, she also uses Light Arrows and can also combine the two pieces of the Triforce of Wisdom to produce a magic blast at the end of her Focus Spirit. Her use of Light Arrows and Triforce of Wisdom are based on her depiction from The Wind Waker.
The Adult Timeline is the timeline that follows the events after Link is being sent back to his original time, following the Hero of Time's defeat of Ganondorf in the final battle. Ganondorf is sealed within the Sacred Realm by the Seven Sages but, with Link sent back in time, the world is left without a Hero. This turn of events created the timeline containing The Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks.
The second game, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, was released for the Famicom Disk System in Japan on January 14, 1987,[56] and for the Nintendo Entertainment System in Europe in November 1988 and North America in December 1988. The game exchanged the top-down perspective for side-scrolling (though the top-down point of view was retained for overworld areas), and introduced RPG elements (such as experience points) not used previously or thereafter in the series. The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II were released in gold-coloured cartridges instead of the console's regular grey cartridges. Both were re-released in the final years of the Nintendo Entertainment System with grey cartridges.
Three Zelda-themed LCD games were created between 1989 and 1992. The Zelda version of Nintendo's Game & Watch series was released first in August 1989 as a dual-screen handheld electronic game similar in appearance to today's Nintendo DS. It was re-released in 1998 as a Toymax, Inc. Mini Classic and was later included as an unlockable extra in Game & Watch Gallery 4, a 2002 compilation for the Game Boy Advance. While the Game & Watch Zelda was developed in-house by Nintendo, the subsequent two LCD games were developed by third parties under license by Nintendo. In October 1989, The Legend of Zelda was developed by Nelsonic as part of its Game Watch line. This game was an actual digital watch with primitive gameplay based on the original Legend of Zelda. In 1992, Epoch Co. developed Zelda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Triforce for its Barcode Battler II console. The game employed card-scanning technology similar to the later-released Nintendo e-Reader.
Mario Kart Wii was the sixth game in the Mario Kart series, following Super Mario Kart, Mario Kart 64, Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Mario Kart: Double Dash, and Mario Kart DS.[11] Hideki Konno, who worked with the Software Development Department of Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) division and had previously worked on the first 2 Mario Kart games as well as Mario Kart DS, served as the game’s producer. Shigeru Miyamoto acted as “General Producer” and gave miscellaneous advice on various aspects of the game.[12]
Jump up ↑ "I had a dream... In the dream, dark storm clouds were billowing over the land of Hyrule... But suddenly, a ray of light shot out of the forest, parted the clouds and lit up the ground... The light turned into a figure holding a green and shining stone, followed by a fairy... I know this is a prophecy that someone would come from the forest..." — Princess Zelda (Ocarina of Time)
Like previous Mega Man games, the weapons are varied but not all are useful. My favorites were Bounce Man’s B. Ball, a versatile weapon you can easily aim at enemies (similar to Metal Man’s Metal Blade in Mega Man 2); Block Man’s B. Dropper to rain heavy objects down on out-of-reach enemies; and the aforementioned P. Driver for skipping puzzle areas entirely. On the other side, Fuse Man’s S. Thunder is a charge that climbs walls and has few uses, and Blast Man’s C. Blast is a slow moving, remotely-detonated bomb that is way too slow to use in any context in a fast-moving game like Mega Man 11.
VS Race – Multiple human players race against each other on any course with customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. The mode also includes single-player VS races and CPU controlled players to compete in VS races as well since Mario Kart DS (except for Mario Kart 7). Super Circuit, however, features a Quick Run mode, which shares similarities with VS mode.
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