-There's no minimap on the screen during races or battle mode. You apparently have to use the gamepad screen for the minimap, which is pointless if you're not playing using the gamepad or unfair in local multiplayer if only one person gets to use the gamepad. Also by removing your eyes from the road to look down at the gamepack can often result in disaster. So, what the heck, I want an onscreen minimap as is tradition.

Original Article: Since its reveal in September, all signs have pointed towards the idea that World of Final Fantasy MAXIMA would be a digital-only release on Switch. Rumours started to circulate in October when physical editions for the Xbox One appeared with no Switch version in sight, and there were still no physical copies available when it finally launched last month.
Whether racing around an obstacle-filled track or battling in an arena, drifting and tossing items are the keys to Mario Kart success. Players can shake the Wii Remote while launching off a ramp to pull off a trick that will temporarily boost their speed. When riding a bike, players can gain additional speed by flicking the Wii Remote up and popping a wheelie
The Final Fantasy series has also featured a more basic, traditional turn-based system, such as the original Final Fantasy through to Final Fantasy III that do not rely on time, but the player and the enemy party take turns executing commands. Final Fantasy X features a Conditional Turn-Based Battle system where turns are taken based on an Act List, the turn order depending on the units' stats and statuses, and commands being ranked usually with stronger commands having longer "recovery time" until the unit can act again.
This Princess Zelda is confirmed to be a direct descendant of Tetra,[12] the pirate captain who was also the incarnation of Princess Zelda in her day, and makes an appearance in a large stained glass window in Hyrule Castle's Throne Room.[133] Princess Zelda states that the Spirit Flute was played for her in her youth by her grandmother, and Anjean states that she gave the Spirit Flute to Tetra long ago, pointing out the similarities between the reigning Princess Zelda and her ancestor, the feisty pirate captain that arrived on the land's shores long ago.
While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.
Mega Man 11 sticks so close to the established formula that it wouldn’t have made much of a splash if it had come out in 2008, or 1998. In fact, it has more in common with 1996’s Mega Man 8 than any other game in the series, and feels like a direct sequel to it. I found Mega Man 11 amusingly difficult even with the help of the time-slowing Double Gear system and there are some cool robot moments, but in a series with such great highs (Mega Man 2, 3, 9,10, specifically) and lows (Mega Man 7), it’s pretty average. The robot bosses are mostly bland and familiar (with the exception of the very silly Block Man – I love that guy), and their imparted weapons are a hit-and-miss collection. But Mega Man plays like he should even with the cutesy but tolerable art style, and that’s good because the challenge is cranked up to 11 and getting through these levels takes old-school precision and patience. Mega Man 11 is a good foundation for the next 10 Mega Man games.
Down smash Flame Blast 17% (clean), 14% (mid), 9% (late) Mega Man plants both arm cannons into the ground, causing two vertical flaming pillars to erupt from the ground either side of him which launch the opponent upwards. It has quick startup, but notoriously long endlag that leaves it highly punishable if not landed. Immense knockback when hit with the first frames of the hitbox, which can KO starting at 60% when fully charged. It boasts incredible power, being the fourth-strongest down smash in SSB4, behind Lucario at maximum aura, Ganondorf, and Bowser Jr.. It is based on Flame Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
The new release boasts a rich and varied repertoire of favorites and surprises, developed by the minds of Nobuo Uematsu, game developers SQUARE ENIX and the Distant Worlds production. Performed by the Distant Worlds Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus, recorded in November 2014 at the famed Dvorak Hall of the Rudolfinum in Prague (Czech Republic) and AWR Music Studio in Chicago (USA) and featuring the remarkable singing talents of Distant Worlds favorite, Susan Calloway, Distant Worlds III is recorded in high resolution at 88.2khz/24bit.
Every game in the main Zelda series has consisted of three principal areas: an overworld in which movement is multidirectional, allowing the player some degree of freedom of action; areas of interaction with other characters (merely caves or hidden rooms in the first game, but expanding to entire towns and cities in subsequent games) in which the player gains special items or advice; and dungeons, areas of labyrinthine layout, usually underground, comprising a wide range of difficult enemies, bosses, and items. Each dungeon usually has one major item inside, which is usually essential for solving many of the puzzles within that dungeon and often plays a crucial role in defeating that dungeon's boss, as well as progressing through the game. In nearly every Zelda game, navigating a dungeon is aided by locating a map, which reveals its layout, and a magic compass, which reveals the location of significant and smaller items such as keys and equipment. In later games, the series includes a special "big key" that will unlock the door to battle the dungeon's boss enemy and open the item chest.

Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][82] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
[Amiga] Power Drift[MAME] Power Drift (World)[MAME] Power Drift (World, Earlier)[MAME] Power Drift (Japan)[MAME] Power Drift (World, Rev A)[TG16] Power Drift (Japan) (Alt)[TG16] Power Drift (Japan)[C64 PP] Power Drift (UE)[C64 Tapes] Power Drift (E)[ZX Spectrum Z80] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(128k)[ZX Spectrum Z80] Power Drift (demo) (1989)(Your Sinclair)[ZX Spectrum (TAP)] Power Drift (1989)(Sega & Activision)(128k)[Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 1 of 2)[cr Medway Boys][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 1 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 2 of 2)[cr Medway Boys][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 2 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 3 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989) [a1][CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989)[CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989) [f1][t1]
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.
Dreamwave Productions and Brazilian publisher Magnum Press made its own comic books based on the classic game series. The Brazilian series, Novas Aventuras de Megaman ("New Adventures of Megaman"), were originally published and sold in Brazil between 1996 and 1997 and drew certain criticism for featuring bizarrely altered storylines (with characters from several installments appearing at random, as well as erotic and sexual innuendo in Mega Man and X's relationship with Roll) as well for frequent nudity involving Roll[13] and an original character named Princesa, which attempted to take over the status as the main character of the comics; its sudden end on a cliffhanger. The series was illustrated by Erica Awano, Eduardo Francisco,[14] Daniel HDR and others.[15]
Despite these advantages, Mega Man is not without flaws. His grounded mobility is comparatively poor, with his dashing speed in particular being the 13th slowest in the game. This leaves Mega Man at a disadvantage against characters with better mobility, such as Sheik and Fox. Mega Man's melee attacks also have short range overall despite their extensive utility, causing him to struggle up close against characters with disjointed range like Marth, Link, and Shulk, while the high ending lag on his attacks puts more stress on this flaw. Mega Man's above average weight and falling speed also makes him an easy target for combos and juggles. Finally, Mega Man's projectile-heavy playstyle is also his biggest weakness, as he is heavily affected by powershielding, reflectors, absorbers, and other anti-projectile tools, which can shut down both his approach and defense options.
Princess Zelda returns as a playable character in the fourth installment of Super Smash Bros. Zelda's appearance is once again based on her Twilight Princess design. She can no longer transform into Sheik, as she is her own character now. Her move set and Final Smash is largely the same as in Brawl. However her ability to transform is replaced by the Phantom Slash, where she summons a Phantom Knight straight from The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks to block enemy attacks and projectiles.
Mega Man's playstyle is unique and unorthodox when compared to other fighters, having many projectiles in his moveset (his neutral attack, forward tilt, forward smash, neutral aerial, up aerial, Metal Blade, Crash Bomber and Leaf Shield are all projectiles). However, this only makes Mega Man's comboing ability better and more reliable, as his attacks can easily link into the other when used correctly, allowing Mega Man to easily rack up large amounts of damage on an opponent. His Metal Blade and Crash Bomber are considered to be two of the best projectiles in the game, as both have a wide variety of uses: Crash Bomber is a reliable mindgame tool that forces a punishable reaction out of the opponent: a defensive move (such as shielding or rolling), rushing Mega Man down in an attempt to give back the crash bomber, or simply taking the damage from its explosion. It also dishes out a good amount of shield damage and can combine well with the Metal Blade, forward smash, up aerial, and leaf shield for shield pressure. Metal Blades can string into a grab or dash attack, edgeguard, pressure shields, and even string into up tilt for a kill at higher percentages. Leaf Shield deprives the user of many of his options but in exchange he is granted four hitboxes around him and gives him the unique ability to attack while shielding or during invincibility frames, and it can also be used to gimp or interrupt recoveries of certain characters (such as Ness). When fired as a projectile, it also travels at a further range than any of his others and has high priority, it will outprioritize many other projectiles and continue moving. Complementing his heavy weight, Mega Man possesses an above average recovery in Rush Coil that makes him difficult to kill: it not only boosts him at a high distance, but has the unique quirk of allowing Mega Man to still use his double jump if he hasn't already and should Rush remain on-screen long enough, bouncing off of him can save the player if he gets meteor smashed
In Time Trial mode, players race against the clock through the same tracks that are present in Grand Prix mode in 150cc engine class, attempting to set the fastest time possible. There are no opponent racers or item boxes, though the player will always begin each race with three Mushrooms in reserve. For any given course the shortest total times are saved, and the shortest single lap time of any race is also saved. The fastest time is saved as a ghost, a copy of the player's performance, which the player can race against later. In Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, 200cc Time Trial has been added.
As Sheik, the character is completely different. Sheik is not only extremely fast, but also easy to control, making her a very popular character both in casual circles and in the tournament scene. Her close range attacks are possibly the fastest and most easily chainable of any character, with her martial arts training allowing fluid and swift ninja-like attacks. Sheik is at her best when using her speed and high-momentum attacks for an evasion-based "hit-and-run" offense. Her needle throwing attack is extremely flexible, and can be used to start combos or keep the enemy at bay. Her chain whip, while situational, is an excellent way to sabotage an opponent's strategy by interrupting their movements. Her Deku Nut-concealed vanish move is shorter than Farore's Wind but leaves Sheik much less open to attack, and is easier to use as an attack as well.
After defeating Calamity Ganon in Hyrule Castle, at Windvane Meadow, Zelda aids Link in his battle with Calamity Ganon's second form, Dark Beast Ganon, gifting him with the Light Bow and giving him advice on how to defeat him. After Link hits Ganon's weak spot, Zelda herself appears, freed from her own sealing magic. She then uses her powers to seal away Ganon for good, entrapping him in an explosion of light. As she and Link reunite face-to-face for the first time in a hundred years, she asks him with a smile if he remembers her.
Though the Gerudo people had originally been against Urbosa becoming a Champion, after her death and Zelda's sealing of Ganon, they chose to remain loyal to Hyrule and as a result Riju and her bodyguard Buliara aided Link a century later out of respect for Lady Urbosa and Princess Zelda whom through Impa had tasked Link in freeing Vah Naboris. Though Riju had only heard of Zelda through legends, she respected her and the two even share similar backgrounds as Riju lost her mother forcing her to bear the burden of becoming Gerudo Chieftain. Riju even recognized the Sheikah Slate Link carried had belonged to Zelda previously showing she is well informed. Riju however like Zelda ultimately proves herself a capable leader despite her own doubts with Link's help. Presumably after Ganon's defeat, Zelda and Riju would work together to rebuild Hyrule and might even bond over their similar backgrounds.
↑ Jump up to: 29.0 29.1 "We must stop him from freeing himself from the seal that imprisons him. At any cost... That is why I intend to remain here in this time and place... To sustain the seal as best as I can. As long as I continue this vigil, we may be able to prevent the demon king from fully reviving himself in our own time." — Zelda (Skyward Sword)

Despite the general ineffectiveness in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess, the Hyrulean Soldiers are depicted as willing to serve and defend their Princess, even in the face of death. In fact, one soldier is implied to have died from wounds he received during Ganondorf's attack on Hyrule Castle, though he managed to instruct the young Hero of Time into heading towards the Temple of Time before succumbing to his wounds. In Twilight Princess, the Hyrulean Soldiers are depicted as valiantly defending the Hyrule Castle throne room and Zelda from the Shadow Beasts lead by Zant, though they prove to be no match for the Shadow Beasts. It is also shown that despite their role and willingness to die defending, Zelda generally cares for their well-being as she does for the rest of her people. This is demonstrated by her decision to surrender Hyrule to Zant rather than see them needlessly slaughtered by Zant's minions.


Princess Zelda plays a much larger role in Spirit Tracks than in previous installments, as she herself also aids Link in the salvation of Hyrule. Near the beginning of the game, Link travels to Hyrule Castle to see Zelda and become an official train conductor. Because he is an engineer and the apprentice of Alfonzo, who was once the head of the castle guard, Zelda asks Link to secretly meet her in her quarters later to discuss something with him. Zelda explains to Link that she needs to get to the Tower of Spirits to personally investigate the disappearance of the Spirit Tracks, which she attributes to something that Chancellor Cole is hiding.
Three weeks after Wily found Ra Moon, the electromagnetic field begins to affect all the machinery and electronics around the world. Roll falls into a coma victim of the electromagnetic field, and Wily makes a worldwide broadcast saying to the world surrender for him in two weeks, or else he will shut down all machinery, which would effectively kill Roll and all the robots around the world, and without them, humans would die as well. Dr. Light quickly immunizes Mega Man and his brothers (the Robot Masters from Mega Man 1 : Cut Man, Elec Man, Ice Man, Fire Man, Bomb Man, and Guts Man) from the electromagnetic field, and sends them to stop Dr. Wily before it's too late. During the adventure, Mega Man and his comrades fought their way to the source of Electromagnetic field, Ra Moon, battling the Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and 3 in the process. In the end, Mega Man manages to destroy Ra Moon and the eletromagnetic field ceases, Roll recovers and all the machinery around the world starts functioning again.
When it came to Mega Man 9, the one most people considered the hardest, I didn't really think it was that bad, the difficultly never felt punishing and it was usually fair in how many power-ups you were given and how the levels got steadily harder as you went along. Then came 10 which I thought was just WAY too hard and not in a good way. Where 9 felt balanced, 10 felt cheap and I found myself dying over and over for the stupidest reasons before finally just giving up on the game.
Mario Kart Wii features multiple game modes: Grand Prix, Time Trials, Versus, and Battle. All modes support single-player gameplay; Versus and Battle support local multiplayer for up to four players, with or without computer-controlled players. In Grand Prix, the player participates in four three-lap races from one of eight cups against eleven opponents. The player is awarded points at the end of each race based on their ranking. The total number of points collected determines the player's overall rank. Versus mode is similar to Grand Prix, but the presented courses and items may configurable. In Time Trials, the player must quickly complete the race in the fastest time possible— there are no opponents or items except for three Mushrooms given at the start of each race. The player can compete against a ghost character, which mimics a player's movements from an earlier race. Ghost data can be saved in the Wii console memory.
Jump up ↑ "Once the wizard had finished casting his spell, Princess Zelda crumpled where she stood. [...] Mad with grief and regretting what he had done, the young king placed his sleeping sister, Princess Zelda, on an altar in the North Castle, in the hopes that she would someday be revived. [...] The story became the legend of the first Princess Zelda. [...] There came a day when the demon army led by the Demon King Ganon invaded Hyrule and stole the Triforce of Power. The reigning Princess Zelda divided the Triforce of Wisdom, which was in her possession, into eight pieces, hiding them in different corners of the kingdom. [...] Just then, a boy named Link appeared. [...] Using the power of the Triforce of Wisdom, Link crushed the Demon King and saved Princess Zelda. [...] Even after defeating Ganon, Link remained in the Kingdom and lent a hand to the reconstruction efforts. [...] Link, having obtained the Triforce of Courage, used the Triforce's power to awaken Princess Zelda I from her slumber." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 104-107, 109)
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
Princess is also featured in other media, including comics based on the games, animated shows, and the Super Smash Bros. series. In some of her appearances, she is depicted as a brave, proud, and self-reliant fighter who is proficient in archery and horseback riding, such as in the The Legend of Zelda comics by Valiant Comics and The Legend of Zelda TV series. As with the games, she is the protector of the Triforce of Wisdom.
In Twilight Princess, Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the deaths of herself and her people.[28] Afterward, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle. It is revealed that Zelda is unaffected by the veil of Twilight Zant casts upon Hyrule and does not become a spirit like all the other inhabitants of the kingdom. As the bearer of the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda may have been protected by its power.[23]
This game was a gift for my brother's birthday and he and I remember playing Megaman from our childhoods so this game was a much anticipated gift! Game is crisp and clean with new style of graphics. Megaman uses a whole new time slowing ability and/or power up ability allowing Megaman to unload MEGA devastation on his enemies! You will see new boss power-ups like never before with Megaman's copy techniques and good ole dog rush and friends return for support.

Overall, the Final Fantasy series has been critically acclaimed and commercially successful, though each installment has seen different levels of success. The series has seen a steady increase in total sales; it sold over 10 million units worldwide by early 1996,[134] 45 million by August 2003, 63 million by December 2005, and 85 million by July 2008.[135][136][137] In June 2011, Square Enix announced that the series had sold over 100 million units,[138] and by March 2014, it had sold over 110 million units.[139] Its high sales numbers have ranked it as one of the best-selling video game franchises in the industry; in January 2007, the series was listed as number three, and later in July as number four.[46][140] As of 2018, the series has sold over 142 million units worldwide.[141]
Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.
Many of her abilities as both a Sage and the wielder of the Triforce of Wisdom are widely illustrated in Ocarina of Time, one of them being that she has prophetic visions in her dreams.[33][34] She also helps Link in their escape from Ganon's Castle by using her powers to magically remove the barriers blocking the exits. During the final battle between Link and Ganon, Princess Zelda uses her powers to restrain the King of Evil as Link delivers the final blow.[35] Being the seventh Sage, she is the ruler of the rest of the six Sages, and it is with her guidance that the Sages seal Ganon in the void of the Evil Realm.[3][36] Finally, with her powers as a Sage, she is capable of returning Link to his original time by simply using the Ocarina of Time.[37]
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
Afterwards, Impa reveals to Zelda and the others of her intent to remain in the past to safeguard the Master Sword, much to Zelda's sadness. As a token of her appreciation, Zelda gives one of her armlets to the Sheikah. Impa assures Zelda that they will reunite, before watching the Hylians depart to their own time. At the Sealed Grounds' overseer of their time, Zelda, Link, and Groose are greeted by the Old Lady. Zelda notices the Old Lady's armlet, realizing that it is the one she gave to Impa. The Old Lady is then revealed to be Impa of the present, to everyone's surprise. Immediately afterwards, Impa passes on, with Zelda thanking her for everything she did for them.
LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.

Princess Zelda appears in this game solely as Tetra, her alter ego in The Wind Waker. She does not regain her royal persona, although quite often when she appears, “Zelda's Lullaby” plays in the background, and she is called "Zelda" by some of the pirates during the game's intro,[123] much to Tetra's chagrin.[124] Her role is somewhat limited in the game as she is kidnapped early on in the story, and when Link finds her at last she has been turned to stone.[125]


Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]
The Legends series concluded with only two main games and a spin-off starring mainstay antagonist Tron Bonne before being discontinued. Unlike Battle Network and Zero, the final game in the series does not resolve the storyline. A continuation to the Legends series has become an oft-requested game among many Capcom and Mega Man fans. A third game was once under development for the Nintendo 3DS, but on July 17, 2011, Capcom cancelled the project saying it did not meet certain requirements. This decision was met with criticism from fans and gaming news outlets.[3][4]
Dreamwave Productions and Brazilian publisher Magnum Press made its own comic books based on the classic game series. The Brazilian series, Novas Aventuras de Megaman ("New Adventures of Megaman"), were originally published and sold in Brazil between 1996 and 1997 and drew certain criticism for featuring bizarrely altered storylines (with characters from several installments appearing at random, as well as erotic and sexual innuendo in Mega Man and X's relationship with Roll) as well for frequent nudity involving Roll[13] and an original character named Princesa, which attempted to take over the status as the main character of the comics; its sudden end on a cliffhanger. The series was illustrated by Erica Awano, Eduardo Francisco,[14] Daniel HDR and others.[15]
Jump up ↑ "I am unsure how to put today's events into words. Words so often evade me lately, and now more than ever. He saved me. Without a thought for his own life, he protected me from the ruthless blades of the Yiga Clan. Though I've been cold to him all this time...taking my selfish and childish anger out on him at every turn... Still, he was there for me. I won't ever forget that." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)

In the end, Mega Man defeated the remaining Robot Masters and infiltrated Wily's fortress. Along the way, Bass challenges him to a duel, having used Evil Energy to increase his power, but Mega Man emerges triumphant once more. When he finally reaches Dr. Wily, he is caught in an energy trap and is almost destroyed by Wily's machine's cannon, but is saved when Duo appears and takes the blast for him. Duo, now immobilized, is in turn saved by Proto Man. Mega Man thanks Proto Man for helping Duo recover and takes on Wily's newest machine.


The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, a remaster of the original GameCube game, was released by Nintendo on September 20, 2013, digitally on the Nintendo eShop in North America with a retail release on September 26 in Japan, October 4 in North America and Europe, and October 5 in Australia. A month later, Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS, which takes place in the same setting as A Link to the Past.[92][93]
Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward.[101] Tetsuya Nomura was chosen to replace Amano because Nomura's designs were more adaptable to 3D graphics. He worked with the series from Final Fantasy VII through Final Fantasy X;[74][101] for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[111] Nomura is also the character designer of the Kingdom Hearts series, Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy.[112] Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI, and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and Final Fantasy XII.[40][113]
Mega Man then went to Dr. Wily's castle and defeated Dr. Wily again. Dr. Wily, as usual, begged Mega Man for forgiveness. Mega Man responded to this by having Rush play clips of all the times Wily had done the same routine (the clips being scenes from previous games). Although Wily seemed contrite and apologetic, he tricked Mega Man into thinking that Dr. Light was, in fact, imprisoned in a jail cell in the next room. Although Proto Man appeared and warned him that it was a trap, Mega Man went to investigate the cell and was electrocuted by the fake Light robot and Wily set his hideout to self-destruct. Proto Man saved Mega Man, but Wily escaped yet again.

After Link finds a second Gate of Time and goes to the past, he meets up with Zelda there. It is then revealed that Zelda is the reincarnation of Hylia. She also confesses to manipulating Link's feelings for her (as Hylia) so that he could fulfill his destiny, a deed for which she is very remorseful. In order to maintain Demise's imprisonment, Zelda seals herself. While doing so, Zelda asks Link for him to wake her up when his mission is complete.


In 2002, a follow-up series to the Mega Man X franchise was developed for the Game Boy Advance which starred Zero, a character created for the Mega Man X series as a sidekick/ally of Mega Man. The series revolved around Zero battling a powerful human-supremacy force as he protects the oppressed remaining reploids. In the Mega Man Zero series, the gameplay is largely similar to Zero's play style in the later Mega Man X games and features an in-depth ranking system that rewards the player with new abilities and enhancements (such as copied abilities from boss characters) in exchange for better play performance. In the fourth game, Zero can also physically steal weapons from enemies (such as axes and guns).
A sequel (of sorts) to the Legacy Collection has been announced, which, continuing where the first left off, consists of Mega Man series games 7, 8, 9, and 10. This is a bit more of a smorgasbord, though, since unlike the NES titles from the previous collection, these span at least three different systems. It’s not a simple matter of tossing an NES emulator on there and calling it good. And considering I’m not sure whether MM9 and MM10 used an emulator or a brand new custom engine, it’s possible they’ll find themselves emulating an emulator. Ah, fun times are ahead indeed.
Mega Man then went to Dr. Wily's castle and defeated Dr. Wily again. Dr. Wily, as usual, begged Mega Man for forgiveness. Mega Man responded to this by having Rush play clips of all the times Wily had done the same routine (the clips being scenes from previous games). Although Wily seemed contrite and apologetic, he tricked Mega Man into thinking that Dr. Light was, in fact, imprisoned in a jail cell in the next room. Although Proto Man appeared and warned him that it was a trap, Mega Man went to investigate the cell and was electrocuted by the fake Light robot and Wily set his hideout to self-destruct. Proto Man saved Mega Man, but Wily escaped yet again.
The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.
Neutral aerial Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 2% (Mega Buster) Behaves identically to Mega Man's neutral attack, except Mega Man fires while jumping or falling in the air much like in his original games. The move has a sweetspot on the Mega Buster that has high base knockback and can serve as a surprise KO option when edge-guarding. Due to Mega Man's effective aerial movement, his neutral attack can be used as a very effective "wall" to deny approaches.
But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
Mega Man, known as Rockman in Japan, is a video game franchise created by Capcom, starring the robot character Mega Man, or one of his many counterparts. Mega Man, released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1987, was the first in a series of over 50 games on multiple systems. A roster of corrupted robot masters faced Mega Man in separate stages in the game. By March 2015, the series had sold about thirty million copies worldwide.[1]
This Princess Zelda is confirmed to be a direct descendant of Tetra,[12] the pirate captain who was also the incarnation of Princess Zelda in her day, and makes an appearance in a large stained glass window in Hyrule Castle's Throne Room.[133] Princess Zelda states that the Spirit Flute was played for her in her youth by her grandmother, and Anjean states that she gave the Spirit Flute to Tetra long ago, pointing out the similarities between the reigning Princess Zelda and her ancestor, the feisty pirate captain that arrived on the land's shores long ago.
Just like everyone else has said, this is Zelda meets Skyrim. Still that is an awesome idea, and it is executed almost flawlessly. I love open the world and how it will be hours before you see your first classic dungeon. In fact, the classic dungeons feel tighter and more creative than most of the temples from a lot of the last games. I haven't completed the game yet, but feel there is so much content here it will last me months before I complete it. I am writing this review as part of a contest
I just wish Square-Enix could have done this with .. pretty much any of the other characters in the game in any meaningful way. The only ones they seemed to have made an effort on, at this point in my playthrough, are Cindy and Iris, who both sadly are kind of terrible. Cindy has literally no depth other than "extremely blatant fanservice mechanic", and Iris' entire schtick is "Gladio's little sister that tries way too hard to be cute and has a serious crush on Noctis." Which is really weird that Iris is going for it and Gladio is egging her on when the point of this boyband roadtrip in the first place is to meet up with Noctis' fiancee so they can get married, which Noctis does not at all seem to be reluctant about. ..Ah, and Aranea. They did alright with her, actually. Everyone else (aside from prominent villains) seems to show up once or twice and then fade into the background.

Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.


"Skyward Sword" was released in 2011 and really put the Wii controller to the test. Other spin-offswere released for Nintendo's numerous handheld systems which show Link in unusual adventuressuch as "Link's Awakening" for the Game Boy (1993) or "A Link Between Worlds" for the 3DS (2014).For those who not only want a virtual adventure but also want to take home a slice of the hero'sfantasy world, the Zelda fan merch in the EMP Online Shop will not disappoint.
Like Link, several of Zelda's various incarnations are shown to be talented musicians. At least three of incarnations are known to be harp-players (Ocarina of Time, Skyward Sword, and Hyrule Warriors). She also shows a talent for playing wind-based instruments such as an ocarina and a pan flute. She is also been shown to have a talent for singing as well.
Various artbooks and source books have been released for many years in Japan, often including conceptual artwork, interviews with production staff, and background information on the storyline and concepts that are not present within the games themselves. One of the most well-known is the Rockman Perfect Memories sourcebook released in 2002 which first confirmed the presence of an alternate timeline (for Battle Network), as well as exactly where the Legends series fit into the fictional Mega Man universe.
Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]
Despite these advantages, Mega Man is not without flaws. His grounded mobility is comparatively poor, with his dashing speed in particular being the 13th slowest in the game. This leaves Mega Man at a disadvantage against characters with better mobility, such as Sheik and Fox. Mega Man's melee attacks also have short range overall despite their extensive utility, causing him to struggle up close against characters with disjointed range like Marth, Link, and Shulk, while the high ending lag on his attacks puts more stress on this flaw. Mega Man's above average weight and falling speed also makes him an easy target for combos and juggles. Finally, Mega Man's projectile-heavy playstyle is also his biggest weakness, as he is heavily affected by powershielding, reflectors, absorbers, and other anti-projectile tools, which can shut down both his approach and defense options.
I bought this for my kids because of the great memory I had playing Zelda 2 when I was a kid. That was one of the most challenging and rewarding games I had ever finished. I've not played video games for over 25 years until getting the switch and BOTW. I am amazed at how much gaming has improved and how much I've missed out! I like that this game is not all about fighting and is not too violent and gruesome. The game is fun for all ages and even my youngest 5 year old boy enjoys playing it, although he mostly just explores the villages and experiment with cooking. The biggest problem with this game is that it is so addictive that we'll play it all day and don't want to do anything else. So my wife is not too happy.
The spin-offs' gameplay can deviate a lot from the main series. While spin-offs tend to include gameplay fundamentals, if only in abilities and ability names, many stick to role-playing game elements. As an example, although Dissidia Final Fantasy and games following its format are fighting games, they still feature character growth, characters using their specific abilities, and similar equipment systems. Another notable spin-off, Final Fantasy Tactics, is a tactical role-playing game with a job system that uses tactical unit command as opposed to one of the battle systems featured throughout the main series. Many games also feature action elements, such as Final Fantasy Type-0, while others include shooting elements, such as Dirge of Cerberus -Final Fantasy VII-, but still keep the series fundamentals.
Categories: CharactersSagesCompanionsHeroesHyliansHyruleansPrincess ZeldaRoyaltySkyloftiansCharacters in The Legend of ZeldaCharacters in The Adventure of LinkCharacters in A Link to the PastCharacters in Ocarina of TimeCharacters in Ocarina of Time 3DCharacters in Majora's MaskCharacters in Majora's Mask 3DCharacters in Oracle of SeasonsCharacters in Oracle of AgesCharacters in Four SwordsCharacters in The Wind WakerCharacters in The Wind Waker HDCharacters in Four Swords AdventuresCharacters in The Minish CapCharacters in Twilight PrincessCharacters in Twilight Princess HDCharacters in Spirit TracksCharacters in Skyward SwordCharacters in A Link Between WorldsCharacters in Breath of the WildCharacters in The Faces of EvilCharacters in The Wand of GamelonCharacters in Zelda's AdventureCharacters in BS The Legend of ZeldaCharacters in Ancient Stone TabletsCharacters in Super Smash Bros. MeleeCharacters in Super Smash Bros. BrawlCharacters in Hyrule WarriorsBosses in Hyrule WarriorsCharacters in Hyrule Warriors LegendsBosses in Hyrule Warriors LegendsCharacters in Hyrule Warriors: Definitive EditionBosses in Hyrule Warriors: Definitive EditionCharacters in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DSCharacters in Super Smash Bros. for Wii UCharacters in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

In Breath of the Wild, Zelda is one of Link's companions along with Mipha, Daruk, Revali and Urbosa. She wears a blue shirt with Hylian embroideries on it, similar to Link's one and the scarves worn by the four allies. They were all members of the Champions, a group of protectors of Hyrule and the ancient relics, created by her father King Rhoam and commanded by Zelda herself.
Princess Zelda is one of the three most important characters of The Legend of Zelda series, which is also why her name appears in the title of every game. Princess Zelda first appeared in the original The Legend of Zelda, and has since been featured in every subsequent game, with the exception of Link's Awakening. Each incarnation of the Princess is chosen by destiny to be the keeper of the Triforce of Wisdom in their respective eras, which is the main reason why they play such an integral role in the legends of Hyrule.
Sakaguchi wanted the game to have a simple abbreviation in the Roman alphabet (FF) and a four-syllable abbreviated Japanese pronunciation (efu-efu). "Fantasy" was chosen due to the setting, though "Final" was originally intended to be "Fighting", and was changed to avoid conflict with the tabletop game Fighting Fantasy.[4] Though Final Fantasy was released at a time when competing games, such as Sega's Phantasy Star and Dragon Quest III, were released, it pulled Square out of its financial crisis, and when released three years later in North America, outsold several of its peers.

The Adult Timeline is the timeline that follows the events after Link is being sent back to his original time, following the Hero of Time's defeat of Ganondorf in the final battle. Ganondorf is sealed within the Sacred Realm by the Seven Sages but, with Link sent back in time, the world is left without a Hero. This turn of events created the timeline containing The Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks.
K'Nex produced sets with tracks from the game and figures of Mario, Luigi, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, and Bowser in karts and bikes. These have been released to promote Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7, and Mario Kart 8. McDonald's released an eight-character set of Happy Meal toys based on Mario Kart 8, where the characters' karts were customizable with stickers. Nintendo itself has also offered Mario Kart-related merchandise, such as a soundtrack for Mario Kart 64 offered by mail; and varying pieces of merchandise through the Club Nintendo customer rewards program, such as a Mario Kart Wii-themed stopwatch, gold trophies modeled after those in Mario Kart 7, and a CD featuring the soundtrack of Mario Kart 8.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][82] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
Mario Kart Wii was the sixth game in the Mario Kart series, following Super Mario Kart, Mario Kart 64, Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Mario Kart: Double Dash, and Mario Kart DS.[11] Hideki Konno, who worked with the Software Development Department of Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) division and had previously worked on the first 2 Mario Kart games as well as Mario Kart DS, served as the game’s producer. Shigeru Miyamoto acted as “General Producer” and gave miscellaneous advice on various aspects of the game.[12]
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