The Legend of Zelda[a] is an action-adventure video-game series created by Japanese game designers Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. It is primarily developed and published by Nintendo, although some portable installments and re-releases have been outsourced to Capcom, Vanpool, and Grezzo. The series' gameplay incorporates elements of action, adventure, and puzzle-solving games.

The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][94] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][116] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[100][117] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][116][120] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[206]

In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
But there was a lot to like about Skyward Sword, too. The game's impressionist painting aesthetic, its memorable Skyloft village, the fantastically over-the-top villain Ghirahim and scene-stealing Groose. Skyward Sword really embraced its placement as the first Zelda game chronologically, and it revelled in providing Easter eggs and lore-heavy moments to retroactively insert itself as a prequel to later instalments.

Mega Man's primarily extremely courageous and just, choosing to become Mega Man and face the threat Wily posed because he wanted to help and do the right thing. This said he's also a pacifist and in the Mega Man Powered Up pre-boss cutscenes he always tried to find an alternative to violence. This trait was also, to a degree, shown in Mega Man 8 where he questioned Bass as to why they must fight. Along with these traits he's also kind, generous and polite.
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
↑ Jump up to: 29.0 29.1 "We must stop him from freeing himself from the seal that imprisons him. At any cost... That is why I intend to remain here in this time and place... To sustain the seal as best as I can. As long as I continue this vigil, we may be able to prevent the demon king from fully reviving himself in our own time." — Zelda (Skyward Sword)
Some of Princess Zelda's physical abilities are demonstrated in games such as The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess and Spirit Tracks. In The Wind Waker, Princess Zelda aids Link in battling Ganondorf by borrowing the young hero's bow and using it to fire Light Arrows at the King of the Gerudo.[31] This skill is again portrayed in the final battle of Twilight Princess, where the princess yet again uses a bow and Light Arrows to strike Ganondorf while accompanying Link on his horse,[38] and once more in the final battle against Malladus in Spirit Tracks. In one scene of Twilight Princess, Princess Zelda is seen wielding a sword, although it is unknown if she possesses any true sword skills.

Nintendo DS Mario Kart DS, released for the Nintendo DS in 2005, is the second title to be released on a handheld gaming system. It returns to the one-person karts used before Double Dash!!, and includes a new Mission Mode, where the player must complete eight missions (ranging from collecting coins to attacking enemies) in one of seven sets, and engage in battles with bosses from Super Mario 64 DS. The game makes use of the DS's dual-screen features by using the top screen to display the racer's kart and the bottom screen to show either a course overview or a bird's-eye view of the immediate vicinity. Dry Bones and R.O.B. (and Shy Guy for one-cartridge multiplayer mode) make their Mario Kart debut in this game, with this being R.O.B.'s sole appearance thus far. Mario Kart DS features a multiplayer mode where players can race each other using the DS Download Play feature or a multi-card wireless LAN service; additionally, it was also playable online via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service until its termination in 2014. Furthermore, the use of unlockable retro tracks from earlier installments was reintroduced here and made a permanent feature of the series.
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, a remaster of the original GameCube game, was released by Nintendo on September 20, 2013, digitally on the Nintendo eShop in North America with a retail release on September 26 in Japan, October 4 in North America and Europe, and October 5 in Australia. A month later, Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS, which takes place in the same setting as A Link to the Past.[92][93]
When Zelda's power failed to awaken on Mount Lanayru, Urbosa told Zelda not to give up hope as she did all she could and noted Mount Lanayru wasn't her last shot as anything could spark her powers to awaken. When Ganon appeared Urbosa initially wanted to take Zelda to safety but Zelda refused wanting to fight alongside her comrades even without her powers which Urbosa did not object to, understanding and respecting Zelda's desire to stand alongside them against Ganon along with her courage and sense of duty. Ultimately Urbosa was correct about Zelda's powers as the spark she spoke of occurred when Zelda selflessly tried to shield the exhausted Link from an attacking Guardian saving Zelda and Link. Even In death, Urbosa continued to support Link and Zelda as a spirit once freed from Thunderblight Ganon's imprisonment.
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