The tracks in Mario Kart Wii are based thematically on locations seen in the Mario series,[original research?] such as Bowser's Castle. Each of the eight cups features four different tracks for a total of 32 unique tracks, 16 of which are new to the series, while the other 16 are several tracks ported from previous installments.[6] The cups (groups of tracks) are the Mushroom, Flower, Star, Special, Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups. The Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups each contain retro tracks, updated versions of tracks originally found in the five previous Mario Kart installments. There are ten arena courses available for Battle mode, which include five original courses and five retro courses.[7]

The Legends series concluded with only two main games and a spin-off starring mainstay antagonist Tron Bonne before being discontinued. Unlike Battle Network and Zero, the final game in the series does not resolve the storyline. A continuation to the Legends series has become an oft-requested game among many Capcom and Mega Man fans. A third game was once under development for the Nintendo 3DS, but on July 17, 2011, Capcom cancelled the project saying it did not meet certain requirements. This decision was met with criticism from fans and gaming news outlets.[3][4]


During a city battle against Bass, Mega Man is called away to investigate an island uncharted by any maps. After defeating a hermit crab-like robot, he finds Dr. Wily, who reveals that the island was his base before absconding with an orb of strange purple energy. Although unable to stop Wily's escape, Mega Man finds a badly damaged robot in a crater and takes it back to Dr. Light's lab. While the robot is brought in for repairs, Dr. Light informs Mega Man that Dr. Wily is at it again, with four brand-new Robot Masters attacking locations all over the globe.

Although Link uses the Triforce to wish for Demise's destruction, Ghirahim kidnaps Zelda upon her awakening and takes her through the Gate of Time, where Demise is still sealed.[54] Zelda's soul is absorbed and Demise is revived in his true form,[55] but Link manages to defeat the Demon King and seal his remains in the Master Sword. After her soul is restored, Zelda and the young hero return to their own time, where she mentions to Link that she wants to remain in the surface and watch over the Triforce. Zelda asks what Link's intentions are for the future,[56] and Link smiles at her, with the camera panning to show both his and Zelda's Loftwings flying back into the sky, implying that Link chose to stay with Zelda.

The Legend of Zelda[a] is an action-adventure video-game series created by Japanese game designers Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. It is primarily developed and published by Nintendo, although some portable installments and re-releases have been outsourced to Capcom, Vanpool, and Grezzo. The series' gameplay incorporates elements of action, adventure, and puzzle-solving games.


When Link awakens from his seven-year slumber in the Sacred Realm, he encounters Zelda, disguised as a young man of about Link's age named Sheik, who claims to be a survivor of the Sheikah Tribe. Thereafter, Sheik gives Link clues to the locations of the various temples, and teaches him special songs enabling him to warp to specific points near these temples.
In most Zelda games, the player's life meter is represented as a line of hearts. The life meter is replenished a number of different ways, including picking up hearts left by defeated enemies or destroyed objects, fairies or springs located in specific locations, or consuming items such as potions or food. Fairies can be kept in bottles and act as extra lives, reviving the player if they run out of hearts. Players are able to extend their life meter by finding heart-shaped crystals called "Heart Containers". Full heart containers are usually received at the end of dungeons and dropped by the dungeon boss. Smaller "Pieces of Heart" are awarded for completing certain side quests or found hidden around the game world in various places, and require a certain number (usually four) to form a full heart container.
Mario Kart Wii was the sixth game in the Mario Kart series, following Super Mario Kart, Mario Kart 64, Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Mario Kart: Double Dash, and Mario Kart DS.[11] Hideki Konno, who worked with the Software Development Department of Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) division and had previously worked on the first 2 Mario Kart games as well as Mario Kart DS, served as the game’s producer. Shigeru Miyamoto acted as “General Producer” and gave miscellaneous advice on various aspects of the game.[12]
I just wish Square-Enix could have done this with .. pretty much any of the other characters in the game in any meaningful way. The only ones they seemed to have made an effort on, at this point in my playthrough, are Cindy and Iris, who both sadly are kind of terrible. Cindy has literally no depth other than "extremely blatant fanservice mechanic", and Iris' entire schtick is "Gladio's little sister that tries way too hard to be cute and has a serious crush on Noctis." Which is really weird that Iris is going for it and Gladio is egging her on when the point of this boyband roadtrip in the first place is to meet up with Noctis' fiancee so they can get married, which Noctis does not at all seem to be reluctant about. ..Ah, and Aranea. They did alright with her, actually. Everyone else (aside from prominent villains) seems to show up once or twice and then fade into the background.
Beginning on the PlayStation in 1997, a 3D action game series called Mega Man Legends was created to take advantage of the console's advanced graphics hardware. The Legends series is set in the same world as the other Mega Man games, although thousands of years in the future. The world is covered by immense bodies of water and features the return of several major characters from the original series in different situations. The hero, Mega Man (Rock) Volnutt, is a relic hunter called a "Digger" who scavenges various ruins throughout the world in search of refractor shards that can be mined and traded as currency. Mega Man Legends brings the gameplay into 3D and is an action adventure with role-playing game elements.
Mario Kart has also crossed over into the Fortune Street series, where its DS installment features a playable Mario Circuit based on its Double Dash!! and DS versions, and the Wii follow-up features a Mario Circuit whose design is based on Mario Kart Wii. There are also stages based on Mario Kart in the Mario & Sonic series; for example, Olympic Winter Games features Mario Circuit from Mario Kart Wii, Bowser's Castle from Super Circuit, and Sherbet Land from Mario Kart 64 in its ski cross, ice hockey, and curling dream events respectively. Rainbow Road from Mario Kart 64 is featured in F-Zero X; figurines of Mario, Peach, and Bowser racing in their karts appear as dog toys in Nintendogs; and the Animal Crossing series features Mario Kart items in City Folk and references the series in certain lucky tickets in New Leaf.
In his early appearances in Twilight Princess, Zant inspires terrifying dread. His monstrous steel helm is grotesque with a thick, elongated tongue strewn across the lower mouth. Add in the enormous bulging bug eyes, and you have some excellent nightmare fuel fit for your worst enemies. It’s the perfect set up for an imposing villain. Later in the game, Zant’s villainous mystique grows as he creepily whispers into Midna’s ear, revealing a mouth that drips with saliva and split oddly…

Four years later, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past returned to the top-down view (under a 3/4 perspective), and added the concept of an alternate dimension, the Dark World. The game was released for the Super NES on November 21, 1991.[56] It was later re-released for the Game Boy Advance on March 14, 2003, in North America, on a cartridge with Four Swords,[56] the first multiplayer Zelda, and then through Nintendo's Virtual Console service on January 22, 2007. In addition, both this game (unchanged, except for being converted into a downloadable format)[58] and an exclusive "loosely based" sequel (which used the same game engine) called BS Zelda no Densetsu Inishie no Sekiban[59] were released on the Satellaview in Japan on March 2, 1997, and March 30, 1997, respectively.


In the portable entries, the series also performed outstanding sales. Mario Kart: Super Circuit, has sold a total of 5.9 million copies, making it the fourth best-selling game on the Game Boy Advance.[14] The second portable game, Mario Kart DS, has sold a total of 23.60 million copies.[15] The third best-selling game for the Nintendo DS, it is also the best-selling portable game in the series.[15] Mario Kart 7, released for the Nintendo 3DS, has sold 17.21 million copies, and is the best-selling 3DS game as of June 2018.[17]
According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21]
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