The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][94] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
The series has been both commercially and critically successful, selling more than 142 million games worldwide, making it one of the best-selling video game franchises of all time. The series is well known for its innovation, visuals, and music, such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and music by Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy has been a driving force in the video game industry, and the series has affected Square Enix's business practices and its relationships with other video game developers. It has popularized many features now common in role-playing games, also popularizing the genre as a whole in markets outside Japan.
The official Twitter account for The Legend of Zelda recently unveiled new artwork featuring Zelda characters who are rostered in the new Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The artwork showcases Breath of the Wild’s Link, sporting his blue Champions Tunic, alongside Toon Link and Child Link, each of whom are competing with Ganondorf, Sheik, and Princess Zelda in an attempt to reach the Triforce first. The artwork was released as part of a Nintendo-wide countdown to December 7th, when the game is released to the public and available to…
Get ready for a review of a lifetime because I'm about to spit straight fire about this game. You ever want to feel like you're in a high-speed chase going 200 miles an hour while running away from turtles? That's what this game feels like. It incorporates all the genius of all the past MarioKart games into this one mega deluxe game, all while sprinkling in new fun and exciting courses. Seriously dudes, I never cussed out a Mii named Despacito as much as I did while playing online. Don't even get me started on battle mode either that mode don't play. Almost decked my sister in the face on accident because of the tsunami waves of green shells I was being hit with. Overall fantastic masterpiece and just a Pro-Tip never use tilt controls unless you like to have an internal meltdown.

A possible indication of a blood relation between the two in Ocarina of Time is their physical resemblance: they both have blonde hair, blue eyes, and similar facial features. They also have similarly shaped heads. Graphics limitations could be responsible for some of this similarity, however. Certain dialogue could also be perceived as implying a blood relation: the ghost Sharp comments that Link reminds him of Zelda, and that Link "may have some connection with the Royal Family".[4] Link's connection to the Royal Family is highlighted throughout the game, with Link often playing Zelda's Lullaby to verify it. The fact that Impa agrees to teach an outsider a song only Royal Family members are allowed to know could also be interpreted as a hint at Link's blood relation to Hyrule's Royal Family. [5]
I’ve been getting a bunch of emails about Mega Man Legends 2 being made available on PSN. Which speaks to the popularity of the game, I think. I’ve been trying to keep the Game List and Game Counter updated with these sorts of re-releases, but otherwise I haven’t been announcing them all. This may have been an oversight on my part; if you have one of these systems that supports downloadable titles, be sure to browse through the Game List and see if any of them catch your eye!
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Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.

The series has been both commercially and critically successful, selling more than 142 million games worldwide, making it one of the best-selling video game franchises of all time. The series is well known for its innovation, visuals, and music, such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and music by Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy has been a driving force in the video game industry, and the series has affected Square Enix's business practices and its relationships with other video game developers. It has popularized many features now common in role-playing games, also popularizing the genre as a whole in markets outside Japan.
As the holder of the Triforce of Wisdom, she is wise beyond her years and intelligent enough to rule her people. She always wishes to do what is right for others and is extremely self-sacrificing. Though not always capable of defending herself or others on her own, she does not quit and tries to aid allies when she needs their help. She is also forgiving towards former enemies even when they have harmed her in someway. She is however, extremely loyal towards the ones she cares for (such as Link) and does not tolerate them getting harmed.
The success of Final Fantasy and its key role within Square Enix's business plan has served as a double-edged sword. The first movie in the franchise, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, was a box office flop with a net loss of $72-102 million,[87] and delayed the merger between Square and Enix.[88] On the other hand, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn was primarily responsible for overturning the company's financial losses at the end of 2013.[89]
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][94] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][116] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[100][117] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][116][120] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[206]
Other games in the series deviate further from the typical formula. Final Fantasy XII has player characters learn License Points (a variation of the ability points system) to spend on a License Board to purchase "licenses" to wield different equipment, use different spells and boost stats, with total freedom. In the International Zodiac Job System re-release the License Boards are based on jobs. In Final Fantasy X characters learn abilities based on a Sphere Grid that begins linearly but the player can eventually branch the grid out further, and potentially max all stats with various items usable to alter and improve Sphere Grid growth. Another example featuring items for growing skills is Final Fantasy VIII where magic spells are collected into an inventory similar to items, and acquired through refine or draw abilities, with other abilities learned via ability points from the character's equipped Guardian Forces.
On to the good, I really love the art style of this game which feels like a cartoon come to life, something which they were moving closer to on 8 and then backtracked from on 9 and 10. The design of everything is just spot on and I really love the creativity on display as well as the fact that this feels like it has an actual story (something the X games aimed for but the core series usually lacked). The controls are smooth and responsive as they should be in any good Mega Man game and this helps to offset the difficulty of some levels (as does the store which has a lot of helpful items to allow the game to be as hard or easy as you choose to make it).

Sheik is Princess Zelda's Sheikah alter ego in Ocarina of Time. Wearing a blue, possibly armored suit with the red Sheikah eye in the center, and with voice muffled and face concealed, the character is essentially unrecognizable and appears relatively masculine. It is possible that Zelda utilizes her magical skills in altering her appearance. Sheik plays a lyre and teaches Link new songs to help him on his quest. When Link arrives at the Temple of Time near the end of the game, Sheik transforms back into Princess Zelda.


Gifted with a perfectly serviceable faux-3D makeover, and a plot that couldn’t matter less if it tried, 11 once again pits its robot hero against the forces of the cartoonishly nasty Dr. Wily. Said battle comes in the form of eight new stages to run and gun through, with eight new bosses lurking at their ends. Despite boilerplate names like Block Man, Impact Man, and Torch Man, this is easily the most colorful bunch of baddies the series has ever offered up, varying wildly in size, and featuring sharp little details like the electrodes poking jauntily out of Fuse Man’s silhouette. That same love has been lavished on the way they fight, too: Rather than execute a few simple patterns of jumps and attacks, each boss battle is now a multi-phase affair, with enemies tossing out super moves and even the occasional full-on transformation. All of these flashy theatrics—which put a welcome edge onto the long-standard process of learning and overcoming a boss—are empowered by the Double Gear system, the game’s one big contribution to the Mega Man canon. A fancy way of saying “short-lived bursts of extra power or speed,” the Gears’ powers aren’t just confined to your enemies. They’re also the biggest tool in Mega Man’s new arsenal—and in the game’s efforts to justify its existence as more than just a pleasant but brief nostalgic stint.
Phantom Slash has been heavily reworked. The Phantom armor now assembles itself behind Zelda rather than appearing fully formed out of a portal in front of her. It is now a single-press chargeable move; Pressing B again will cause the incomplete armor to attack at its current charge level. The move has six charge levels, each resulting in a different attack:
In addition to both the Hyrule Warriors incarnation of Zelda and Tetra, Ghost Zelda who is designated as Toon Zelda appears as a playable character from the Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks DLC. Toon Zelda fights by possessing a Phantom wielding Phantom Arms and light magic fueled by the Sacred Power of the Spirits. Unlike her grandmother Tetra, Toon Zelda has no role in the story. Additionally, there are several Fairy Clothing options based on her outfit can be unlocked on the Grand Travels Map: Destiny Tiara, Destiny Necklace, Destiny Top, and Destiny Skirt.

Many course themes recur throughout the series. Most are based on an existing area in the Mario franchise (Bowser's Castle being among the most prominent), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, but still belong in the Mushroom Kingdom, such as Rainbow Road.[3] Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas.[3] Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups", or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original Super NES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" (courses belonging to its own game) and 16 "retro" tracks (courses from previous Mario Kart games), spread across four cups each with four races. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, including Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.[5]


The sequel to The Legend of Zelda plays on the classic tale of Sleeping Beauty. The Zelda in this game is not the one from the first game, but rather her distant ancestor. The whereabouts of the Zelda from the first game are unknown. Long ago, the power of the Triforce had belonged to one man alone, a great King of Hyrule; however, before his death, he divided the artifact and concealed the part called the Triforce of Courage; the heir to the throne could inherit only the rest.
Mega Man's playstyle is unique and unorthodox when compared to other fighters, having many projectiles in his moveset (his neutral attack, forward tilt, forward smash, neutral aerial, up aerial, Metal Blade, Crash Bomber and Leaf Shield are all projectiles). However, this only makes Mega Man's comboing ability better and more reliable, as his attacks can easily link into the other when used correctly, allowing Mega Man to easily rack up large amounts of damage on an opponent. His Metal Blade and Crash Bomber are considered to be two of the best projectiles in the game, as both have a wide variety of uses: Crash Bomber is a reliable mindgame tool that forces a punishable reaction out of the opponent: a defensive move (such as shielding or rolling), rushing Mega Man down in an attempt to give back the crash bomber, or simply taking the damage from its explosion. It also dishes out a good amount of shield damage and can combine well with the Metal Blade, forward smash, up aerial, and leaf shield for shield pressure. Metal Blades can string into a grab or dash attack, edgeguard, pressure shields, and even string into up tilt for a kill at higher percentages. Leaf Shield deprives the user of many of his options but in exchange he is granted four hitboxes around him and gives him the unique ability to attack while shielding or during invincibility frames, and it can also be used to gimp or interrupt recoveries of certain characters (such as Ness). When fired as a projectile, it also travels at a further range than any of his others and has high priority, it will outprioritize many other projectiles and continue moving. Complementing his heavy weight, Mega Man possesses an above average recovery in Rush Coil that makes him difficult to kill: it not only boosts him at a high distance, but has the unique quirk of allowing Mega Man to still use his double jump if he hasn't already and should Rush remain on-screen long enough, bouncing off of him can save the player if he gets meteor smashed
Es gibt immer eine Prinzessin, die es zu retten gilt, und Link ist stets auf der Suche nach dem legendären Master-Schwert. Auch das Triforce spielt eine Rolle: Hierbei handelt es sich um ein mächtiges Artefakt und in den falschen Händen um eine gefährliche Waffe. Und wo ein mächtiges Artefakt ist, können Ganondorf und ähnliche Bösewichte nicht weit sein. Logisch also, dass all diese Markenzeichen der Reihe auch im Zelda Merchandise auftauchen. Tauch in die Phantasiewelt ein und begebe dich auf die Spuren von Link.
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