The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
Some time before the Great Calamity, the Yiga Clan even attempted to assassinate Zelda before she could awaken her sealing magic. They would have succeeded, had it not been for Link`s intervention. After the Great Calamity, with Zelda sealing herself with Ganon in Hyrule Castle, the Yiga Clan focused on hunting down Link and any of Zelda's surviving allies instead.
Hit the road with the definitive version of Mario Kart 8 and play anytime, any-where! Race your friends or battle them in a revised battle mode on new and returning battle courses. Play locally in up to 4-player multiplayer in 1080p while playing in TV Mode. Every track from the Wii U version, including DLC, makes a glorious return. Plus, the Inklings appear as all-new guest characters, along with returning favorites, such as King Boo, Dry Bones, and Bowser Jr.!
Afterwards, Impa reveals to Zelda and the others of her intent to remain in the past to safeguard the Master Sword, much to Zelda's sadness. As a token of her appreciation, Zelda gives one of her armlets to the Sheikah. Impa assures Zelda that they will reunite, before watching the Hylians depart to their own time. At the Sealed Grounds' overseer of their time, Zelda, Link, and Groose are greeted by the Old Lady. Zelda notices the Old Lady's armlet, realizing that it is the one she gave to Impa. The Old Lady is then revealed to be Impa of the present, to everyone's surprise. Immediately afterwards, Impa passes on, with Zelda thanking her for everything she did for them.
When Nintendo revealed the GameCube on August 24, 2000, the day before Nintendo's SpaceWorld 2000 exposition,[79] a software demonstration showed a realistically styled real-time duel between Ganondorf and Link. Fans and the media speculated that the battle might be from a Zelda game in development.[80] At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda game, later released as The Wind Waker in December 2002. Due to poor reception, nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages".[81][82] The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.
During her time with Link, Zelda wonders why he never speaks.[145] Link's initial silence causes Zelda to believe that Link despised her due to her inability to use sealing power despite being a daughter of Hyrule's royal family.[146] Later on, Zelda discovers an Ancient Shrine and fails to open it.[147] Link arrives at the scene, which angers Zelda and causes her to lash out.[148] She tells Link to return to the castle[149] and testily demands he stop following her, regardless of the King's orders.[150] Later on, Zelda travels to the Gerudo Desert and is ambushed by the Yiga Clan. Link rescues her right before a Yiga assassin is about to kill her, striking him down and causing the other two Yiga to flee. This causes Zelda to change her attitude towards Link, valuing his devotion to protect her.[151] Over the course of their journey, both start to open up to each other and realize how similar they are in their hardships of fulfilling their respective tasks.[152] Her growing care and relationship towards Link plays a crucial role in awakening her legendary abilities.[153]
Significant portions of this product require (i) an internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live or PlayStation Network account (if playing on an Xbox One or PlayStation®4, respectively). Multiplayer features of this product require (i) a persistent internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live Gold or PS Plus account (if playing on a Xbox One or PlayStation®4 respectively). Third-party accounts may require payment of additional fees.
Character concept artwork was handled by Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy VI who also handled logo and promotional image designs for games to follow. He was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura from Final Fantasy VII onwards (with the exception of Final Fantasy IX—where it was handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana and Shin Nagasawa—and Final Fantasy XII—where it was handled by Akihiko Yoshida).
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[100] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]
As well as great fan merch from Pokémon and Nintendo, the EMP online shop also offers everything that a Zelda fan could ask for: Dress like Link with Zelda t-shirts and hoodies and decorate your walls with art work and posters. Show off the power of the Triforce with bags, backpacks, Zelda Caps and jewellery: always there by your side! Kit yourself out for the 30th anniversary with the best Zelda merch so you're fully prepared for "Breath of the Wild"!

So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
Jump up ↑ "There are three kinds of Triforce -- Power, Wisdom, and Courage. [...] Of the three, I have left Power and Wisdom in the kingdom. But the Triforce Courage I have hidden for a reason. [...] The Triforce of Courage is hidden in the Great Palace in the Valley of Death on the largest island in Hyrule." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 9, 10)
The music was composed by Asuka Ohta and Ryo Nagamatsu; who both used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games alongside original material. A 46-track official soundtrack was released in December 2011 as a Club Nintendo reward in Japan.[18] The speaker on the Wii Remote is frequently used during gameplay, as sound effects like crashes and warning signals are emitting from it. During the extensive testing of the different Wii Wheel prototypes, the developers decided to have the voice actors playing the game during recording sessions.[14]
The first game in the Mario Kart series is Super Mario Kart which was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1992. The development of the first game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, the Japanese video game designer who created the original Super Mario Bros., as well as many other successful games for Nintendo. Darran Jones of NowGamer suggests that the original success of Super Mario Kart was the result of including characters previously seen in Mario Bros. games, while also being a new type of racing game.[2]
Although not the first game to be released outside of Japan, Final Fantasy VII was the first overseas to popularize the series, and the JRPG genre.[5][6] Although the game is still the best-selling game in the series, with over 11 million units sold between its original release and subsequent re-releases,[7] the series has continued to find financial success since and has become the company's best-selling franchise worldwide.[2]

Because they had a good relationship with Tetra, they also quickly warmed up to her granddaughter Zelda when she asked for their help. They could also for some unexplained reason, see her even in her spirit form. They have stated Zelda's resemblance to Tetra whom they thought was an intelligent person. Even Byrne was moved by Zelda's words as he sacrificed himself to save New Hyrule despite his earlier intentions. Both Link and Zelda in turn were relieved to hear that Byrne was not truly dead. The Lokomos asked the duo to watch the land in there place, showing that they trust their Hylian allies.


Grand Prix – Players compete in various "cups," groups of four courses each (five in Super Mario Kart) with difficulty levels based on the size of the engine, larger engines meaning faster speeds. Before Mario Kart 8 there were four difficulties: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and 150cc Mirror (courses that are mirrored in terms of direction). Mario Kart 8 added a fifth difficulty level: 200cc. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race and the top three players with the most points overall will receive a trophy.
Legacy Collection 1 and 2 also offer up timed Challenges, which are remixed Mega Man levels that provide a more substantial challenge. Players traverse through various parts of different levels, all while trying to beat a predetermined score. Mega Man levels are difficult, often rewarding a slow, methodical pace, but the Challenges are the complete opposite. Believe me, you’ll need all of your skills to complete them.
The Wind Waker is parallel, and takes place in the other timeline branch, more than a century after the adult era of Ocarina of Time.[45][46] Phantom Hourglass is a continuation of the story from The Wind Waker,[47] and is followed by Spirit Tracks, which is set about 100 years later on a supercontinent far away from the setting of The Wind Waker.[48] At the time of its release, Four Swords for the Game Boy Advance was considered the oldest tale in the series' chronology, with Four Swords Adventures set sometime after its events.[49] The Minish Cap precedes the two games, telling of the origins of villain Vaati and the creation of the Four Sword.[50] A Link Between Worlds takes place six generations after Link to the Past. Important events that occur in the game include the Triforce being reunited, and Ganon being resurrected.[51]
When awarding Link with the title of Royal Engineer during his Graduation Ceremony, Zelda slips him a note, warning him of the suspicious Chancellor Cole and instructing Link to take a hidden path and meet her in secret. Zelda requests Link's aid in investigating the mystery of the vanishing Spirit Tracks, which entails Link helping her sneak out of the castle. She then presents Link with a change of clothing, the Recruit Uniform, which will help Link blend in with the similarly dressed guards as they escape the castle. Upon exiting the castle, Link and Zelda enlist the aid of Alfonzo, Link's Master Engineer and mentor, to take them towards the Tower of Spirits. However, the tracks begin to vanish out from underneath their train before they witness the tower's levels being separated and then are stopped in their tracks by Chancellor Cole and Byrne. Byrne easily defeats Link and Alfonzo while Cole uses his magic to force Zelda's spirit out of her body.
Definitely a game to have if you have the switch system. Play with friends and family with a game anytime anywhere. I love the feature to have games anywhere nintendo really did step up the game on creating a awesome experience now they need to just focus on creating a awesome online experience and games then they can step up to the big boys xbox/ps4 . Always have loved nintendo owned every system since they came out with the first nintendo and still will be a fan.

Wii U	Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U in 2014, introduces anti-gravity sections that allow players to drive on walls and ceilings, allowing for more alternate paths in courses. In these sections, a player can bump into other racers or special bumpers to trigger a Spin Boost, which gives them an extra speed boost. The game also introduces all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), allows the player to view replay data from others and upload highlights to YouTube via "Mario Kart TV", introduces the Koopalings as new playable characters, and allows up to four people to play in Grand Prix races. Baby Rosalina and Pink Gold Peach are also introduced as new characters to the Mario franchise. Additional characters, vehicles, and tracks have been released as downloadable content, including actual Mercedes-Benz vehicles. Characters that have been released as add-on content include Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, the returning Dry Bowser, Link from The Legend of Zelda, and the Villager and Isabelle from Animal Crossing; tracks themed after various non-Mario game series have also been made available as add-on content. Additionally, Mario Kart 8 is notable for being the first game in the series to boast HD graphics and live-orchestrated music, as well as the first to receive post-release updates adding new features and enhancements, including rearranged post-race options, 200cc, and support for Nintendo's amiibo line of figurines.

Every time a new Zelda game comes around, I can’t wait to explore its dungeons. There’s just something about that feeling of progression– collecting keys, opening chests, solving puzzles, tackling larger-than-life bosses– that speaks to me. It’s certainly no coincidence that my favorite Zelda entries are those with the strongest dungeons. Indeed, for many fans, these sections have been an integral part of the series. That said, not every dungeon receives a ton of love. From Ocarina of Time’s Water…
The success of Mario Kart has spawned many cartoon-style racing games published by various gaming companies from the 16-bit generation onwards. It has also been referenced in the Paper Mario role-playing series and inspired several stages in the Super Smash Bros. fighting games. The games in the series have sold a combined total of over 100 million copies worldwide.
As pointed out by others, Zelda has many attributes that attracts allies. While not always a stable relationship from the start, she has gained many good friends throughout various games. Most of her friends deeply respect her as the princess of Hyrule and do not doubt her judgment. Her kindness is enough to turn even some of her enemies into allies.
The Final Fantasy series usually puts the player in control of multiple characters in a party, though there are exceptions. The player will build the party's strength by gradually acquiring new abilities and equipment to handle more powerful opponents. In many games this task extends beyond the main story with challenging superbosses and bonus dungeons serving as optional tests of skill. As a Japanese role-playing game, many installments—particularly the earlier installments in the main series, or the throwback spin-offs returning to old formulas—involve frequent use of menus to select items, skills and upgrades.
Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
The series has spawned many spinoff franchises. The most notable, Kingdom Hearts, is a crossover between Final Fantasy characters and Disney characters, and has gone on to be successful in its own right with 21 million units sold.[90] Many games have been released by staff who previously worked on Final Fantasy titles. Bravely Default began as a spiritual successor to Final Fantasy: The 4 Heroes of Light, and includes the job system and similar abilities. The Last Story was developed by series creator Sakaguchi after leaving Square Enix, while Granblue Fantasy was developed by former staff and had a musical score composed by Nobuo Uematsu.
Skyward Sword shook up the series in other ways, too. It removed Zelda's traditional large overworld, and instead used smaller, separate areas designed to be played multiple times, albeit with radical changes for each visit. And then there was Fi, the magical spirit which lived in Link's famous Master Sword. Many fans compared her chattiness to that of Ocarina of Time's Navi - and not in a good way.
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]
In November 2004 in Japan and Europe, and January 2005 in America, Nintendo released The Minish Cap for the Game Boy Advance. In The Minish Cap Link can shrink in size using a mystical, sentient hat named Ezlo. While shrunk, he can see previously explored parts of a dungeon from a different perspective, and enter areas through otherwise-impassable openings.
[Amiga] Power Drift[MAME] Power Drift (World)[MAME] Power Drift (World, Earlier)[MAME] Power Drift (Japan)[MAME] Power Drift (World, Rev A)[TG16] Power Drift (Japan) (Alt)[TG16] Power Drift (Japan)[C64 PP] Power Drift (UE)[C64 Tapes] Power Drift (E)[ZX Spectrum Z80] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(128k)[ZX Spectrum Z80] Power Drift (demo) (1989)(Your Sinclair)[ZX Spectrum (TAP)] Power Drift (1989)(Sega & Activision)(128k)[Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 1 of 2)[cr Medway Boys][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 1 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 2 of 2)[cr Medway Boys][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 2 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][Atari ST] Power Drift (1989)(Activision)(Disk 3 of 3)[cr Equinox - Replicants][CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989) [a1][CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989)[CPC] Power Drift (UK) (1989) [f1][t1]

I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.
Following the Japanese launch of F-Zero, a Super Nintendo Entertainment System game which was exclusively single-player, Nintendo developers decided to create a two-player racing game for that console as a follow-up.[1] They made a prototype that featured a generic "guy in overalls"; it was decided that Mario characters and concepts be included when the developers added Mario driving one of the karts, out of curiosity as to how the game would look, and were satisfied with it.[1] Thus, the Mario Kart series was born, with its first title, Super Mario Kart, released for the SNES on August 27, 1992. Development of the first Mario Kart game was overseen by Shigeru Miyamoto, then the general manager of Nintendo's EAD division, who is best known for creating the Mario franchise and other successful Nintendo properties. Darran Jones of Imagine Publishing's magazine NowGamer attributed the original success of Mario Kart to its use of the Mario characters and to being a new type of racing game.[2]
The rescued princess journeys alongside Kirby until she is attacked and turned into a trophy by Bowser, who uses a swarm of Shadow Bugs to create a clone of the princess. If the princess is Zelda, the clone tries to attack Link and Yoshi, but is intercepted and destroyed by Mario and Kid Icarus hero Pit. Link notices the battle just in time to see what appears to be Zelda's trophy dissolve into nothing, and attacks Mario and Pit in a rage.
Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
Every game in the main Zelda series has consisted of three principal areas: an overworld in which movement is multidirectional, allowing the player some degree of freedom of action; areas of interaction with other characters (merely caves or hidden rooms in the first game, but expanding to entire towns and cities in subsequent games) in which the player gains special items or advice; and dungeons, areas of labyrinthine layout, usually underground, comprising a wide range of difficult enemies, bosses, and items. Each dungeon usually has one major item inside, which is usually essential for solving many of the puzzles within that dungeon and often plays a crucial role in defeating that dungeon's boss, as well as progressing through the game. In nearly every Zelda game, navigating a dungeon is aided by locating a map, which reveals its layout, and a magic compass, which reveals the location of significant and smaller items such as keys and equipment. In later games, the series includes a special "big key" that will unlock the door to battle the dungeon's boss enemy and open the item chest.

When Nintendo revealed the GameCube on August 24, 2000, the day before Nintendo's SpaceWorld 2000 exposition,[79] a software demonstration showed a realistically styled real-time duel between Ganondorf and Link. Fans and the media speculated that the battle might be from a Zelda game in development.[80] At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda game, later released as The Wind Waker in December 2002. Due to poor reception, nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages".[81][82] The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.


Mega Man's role in the original story is to battle the mad scientist Dr. Wily and his ever-growing army of robots, and stop them from taking over Earth by using their own special abilities against them. Utilizing his special Mega Buster arm cannon, and his ability to copy a defeated robot's Special Weapon, Mega Man must travel the world and traverse harsh environments in order to bring Wily's menace to an end. With the help of his creator Dr. Light and his assorted robotic companions, Mega Man's eventual goal is to one day achieve "everlasting peace".
Wii U Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U in 2014, introduces anti-gravity sections that allow players to drive on walls and ceilings, allowing for more alternate paths in courses. In these sections, a player can bump into other racers or special bumpers to trigger a Spin Boost, which gives them an extra speed boost. The game also introduces all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), allows the player to view replay data from others and upload highlights to YouTube via "Mario Kart TV", introduces the Koopalings as new playable characters, and allows up to four people to play in Grand Prix races. Baby Rosalina and Pink Gold Peach are also introduced as new characters to the Mario franchise. Additional characters, vehicles, and tracks have been released as downloadable content, including actual Mercedes-Benz vehicles. Characters that have been released as add-on content include Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, the returning Dry Bowser, Link from The Legend of Zelda, and the Villager and Isabelle from Animal Crossing; tracks themed after various non-Mario game series have also been made available as add-on content. Additionally, Mario Kart 8 is notable for being the first game in the series to boast HD graphics and live-orchestrated music, as well as the first to receive post-release updates adding new features and enhancements, including rearranged post-race options, 200cc, and support for Nintendo's amiibo line of figurines.
I couldn't believe this is still full price after all these years, especially as 2 newer systems have come out. After receiving it, the family has played it everyday! It is truly a game the whole family can enjoy. My 4yo gives up his TV time for the day to play this instead. My wife practices after the kids go to bed. I would still highly recommend this game. I searched for used copies, and you only save about $5 buying used, as it is still in demand.

This Princess Zelda is confirmed to be a direct descendant of Tetra,[12] the pirate captain who was also the incarnation of Princess Zelda in her day, and makes an appearance in a large stained glass window in Hyrule Castle's Throne Room.[133] Princess Zelda states that the Spirit Flute was played for her in her youth by her grandmother, and Anjean states that she gave the Spirit Flute to Tetra long ago, pointing out the similarities between the reigning Princess Zelda and her ancestor, the feisty pirate captain that arrived on the land's shores long ago.
In 1998, Nintendo cancelled The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Ura. Originally intended as an expansion disk for Ocarina of Time on the Nintendo 64DD, poor sales figures for the N64DD system led Nintendo to cancel its plans for the release. In 2002, Nintendo released a bonus disc called The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest. It contained emulated versions of Ocarina of Time and Ocarina of Time Master Quest with a number of modifications originally planned for release in Ocarina of Time Ura including GUI textures and text modified to reflect the GameCube.[citation needed]

For the faint of heart, Capcom provides “casual” and “newcomer” settings that make things easier by granting extra or infinite lives, respectively. Dr. Light also offers assistance through an in-game shop where players can buy chips for Mega Man, boosting his arm cannon; extra parts that make it easier to walk on slippery surfaces or reduce knockback; and a cooling system that recharges his Double Gear functions more quickly. Capcom doesn’t make these power-ups feel like you’re cheating the system somehow; they’re presented as bonuses that can help frustrated players overcome Mega Man 11’s robust challenge a bit faster.
When Nintendo revealed the GameCube on August 24, 2000, the day before Nintendo's SpaceWorld 2000 exposition,[79] a software demonstration showed a realistically styled real-time duel between Ganondorf and Link. Fans and the media speculated that the battle might be from a Zelda game in development.[80] At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda game, later released as The Wind Waker in December 2002. Due to poor reception, nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages".[81][82] The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.
It’s been eight long years since Capcom’s venerable Mega Man franchise last slapped a new numeral onto the end of its name, a span that’s seen the Blue Bomber’s NES contemporaries—most notably Nintendo’s own Mario and Zelda games—evolve dramatically in response to increasingly powerful technology and changing gaming philosophies. But while the franchise’s latest title, Mega Man 11, does its damnedest to try to teach itself a few new tricks, this might be the point where even the most devoted practitioners of the time-honored art of murdering octets of themed robots to steal their magical arm-guns have to accept that this series has comfortably settled into its limits, probably for good.
Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]

The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][101] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[102] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][101] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[103][104][105] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][103] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[106] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][103] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[107] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[108][109][110]

After Mega Man defeats Wily, the doctor becomes sick. Mega Man asks Wily if he has been infected with the Roboenza and Wily answers that he is a human, not a robot. Despite this opportunity to finally end Wily's evil schemes once and for all, Mega Man's heroic nature wins out and he takes Wily to a hospital. The mad scientist immediately broke out after recovering, but left behind enough of the cure to restore all of the robots infected with Roboenza. This would imply that Dr. Wily does in fact have some kindness in him.

The majority of the games are stand-alone stories with unique characters, scenarios and settings, though several spin-offs and sequels to main series games continue stories within the same worlds. The series is defined by its recurring gameplay mechanics, themes and features. Commonly recurring features include the series' "mascot" creature, chocobos, that are often used as steeds; a character named Cid who is usually associated with engineering; moogles, cute flying creatures that often aid the player by facilitating some of the game mechanics; the mythology-based summoned creatures that can be called forth to aid players in battle and also commonly battled as bosses; the job system where playable characters are defined by their job class; and the active time battle system, an evolution of the classic turn-based system common for JRPGs where the units' speed determines how many actions they can take.
At its core, Deluxe is the same great title from Wii U. Racing up a wall is still disorienting fun, and taking the perfect shot with your green shell is satisfying as ever. Even with all the hours I poured into the original Wii U release, I still love the thrill of coming from behind in the final lap to win the race. Of course, some of that is thanks to the questionable rubber-band A.I. that has always been a sticking point of the series, but fans accepted that pitfall as a series mainstay long ago.
So, would I recommend this game? Sure. Is it a must-have? Nah. If you're on the fence, wait until it goes on sale and play something better in the meantime. It's obviously been rushed out in the past couple years, and it's not much of a Final Fantasy game in terms of pacing and plot and cohesiveness in general, but it is a generally entertaining action RPG, if fairly repetitive.
While the Speed Gear initially seems like the more useful half of Mega Man’s new abilities, the Power Gear becomes more instrumental as you defeat more Robot Masters and acquire their special abilities. The Power Gear modifies each ability in fun and additive ways. For example, upon defeating the ice-skating robot Tundra Man, Mega Man will gain the ability to unleash a sub-zero blizzard that creates an icy column of destruction. Flip on the Power Gear, and that blizzard becomes a screen-clearing wintry blast.
Significant portions of this product require (i) an internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live or PlayStation Network account (if playing on an Xbox One or PlayStation®4, respectively). Multiplayer features of this product require (i) a persistent internet connection and (ii) an Xbox Live Gold or PS Plus account (if playing on a Xbox One or PlayStation®4 respectively). Third-party accounts may require payment of additional fees.
Several incarnations of Zelda have ties to the Sheikah through both her connection to the various incarnations of Impa and Zelda's Sheikah alter-ego, Sheik. Interestingly enough, though not a true Sheikah (as Sheik is an alter-ego), Zelda's robes in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess feature the Sheikah Symbol. In the Oracle series, her robes feature an alternate version of the Sheikah Symbol with the "eye" part of the symbol replaced by a Triforce symbol. in Ocarina of Time, Zelda (in her guise as Sheik) is shown to be knowledgeable of various Sheikah legends, which were presumably told to her by Impa, either during her childhood and/or while they were hiding from Ganondorf. It is also implied that Impa trained Zelda in the secret arts of Sheikah in order to allow her to pass herself off as Sheik and better protect herself from Ganondorf and his minions.
I bought this game as a replacement for a Wii game my daughter wanted but I couldn't find. I never expected that I would LOVE it. I rarely play the Wii. It's pretty much a race game. There are several races with all kinds of courses, which go from easy to difficult. You get to choose your character, then the kind of vehicle you want to race in. You can choose to go for a test drive or race against a ghost (either of one of the wii developers or yourself). I've never played previous versions of this game, but they have the Gamecube version at my kids dentist's office and the wii edition of this game is about 1000 percent better in terms of graphics. While racing against other players, you can pick up different obstacles, like a banana, oil slick or bomb to throw at your opponents. Of course, they throw these things at you too, so you have to avoid them. You can also drive over ramps to give you a boost or pick up a tool to give you super speed or shield you from bombs, etc. I've played it with my kids and other adults and everybody always has a blast. I do like the wheel, but I can play the game fine without it, too. All in all it's a lot of fun, worth the extra money, and a great gift for someone who has a wii but you don't know what kind of game they want. I think this would be perfect for anybody, young and old.

Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.
Mario Kart 64 is the first 3D mario game, Nintendo tried before this to make a Mario Kart for SNES. Because it is 3D it gets a lot better and easier to control. With new "Time Trials" and characters it will be very exciting when you win the Grand Prix like 100 times and  keep doing it again for the entertainment. Because of the fact that there is not many bugs I think that it makes it even greater. If you are a Mario Kart fan or just a Mario fan then I think that you should get it. I rated it ........5/5
No level is the same, and their motifs match the Robot Master who rules that domain. You can choose the order in which you tackle stages, and each Robot Master gives Mega Man a new power upon being defeated, opening up new strategies for subsequent levels. There’s lots of fun to be had with trial and error, figuring out which boss to face first and which powers will defeat the next Robot Master faster. Sometimes it’s as easy as Bubble Man’s power (water) defeating Heat Man (fire) but some get more obscure, especially in the later Mega Man games.
Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][116] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][94][116] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[197][198] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[199] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[200] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[201] Grandia,[202] and The Elder Scrolls.[200] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[203] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[204] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[117] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[205]
In Skyward Sword, the Triforce was sought by a demon king named Demise,[22] and after a long battle, Demise was sealed away within the Temple of the goddess Hylia, guardian of the Triforce.[18][23] Hylia, placing the Hylians on a floating island (called Skyloft) in the sky to protect them, orchestrated a means to stop the demon from escaping: creating the Goddess Sword (later becoming the Master Sword) for her chosen hero[24] and discarding her divinity to be reborn among the people of Skyloft.[25] In time, Zelda and Link (the reborn Hylia and her predestined warrior), enacted the goddess' plan and Demise was destroyed. However, Demise vowed that his rage would be reborn and forever plague those descended from Link and Zelda.[26] That prophecy came to fruition in Ocarina of Time, when Ganondorf's attempt to get the Triforce scattered it with him gaining the Triforce of Power. The Triforce of Wisdom ended up with the Hylian princesses descended from Zelda, each named after her, while the Triforce of Courage is passed to a youth named Link across generations. While the Triforces of Power and Wisdom have been part of the series since the original The Legend of Zelda, it was only in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link that the Triforce of Courage was first introduced, being obtained by Link at the end of his quest. The Triforce, or even a piece of it, is not always distributed as a whole. Such as in The Wind Waker, Link must find all the pieces (called Triforce Shards) of the Triforce of Courage before he can return to Hyrule. Even in the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda breaks her Triforce of Wisdom into 8 pieces for Link to find, before she was captured by Ganon.

Up special Default Rush Coil 0% Mega Man briefly summons his robotic dog companion Rush. A second bounce will make Mega Man jump even higher than the first bounce. Other players will also be able to bounce on Rush, even if he is in the air. Mega Man is unable to summon Rush again until he lands, or is hit by an attack after using it. The move is based on the Rush Coil from Mega Man 3.

Like the new weapons that Mega Man can steal from them, the new Robot Masters in Mega Man 11 are inventive and inspired. There are some familiar archetypes, like the explosive Blast Man, icy Tundra Man, electrified Fuse Man and fiery Torch Man, but most have characteristics that help differentiate them from similar bosses in previous games. Torch Man, for example, is a camping safety robot, and his outdoorsy, barbecue-inspired level helps him stand out from past fire-based Robot Masters. Other standouts include Bounce Man, whose stage is full of trampolines and bouncy balls, where Mega Man is forced to platform his way through the stage boinging to and fro; and Blast Man, whose stage is wired with explosives, many of which have to be triggered by launching the level’s combustible enemies into them in order to progress.
Custom 2 Beat 0% Mega Man summons his robotic bird companion Beat, which he grabs onto as he lifts him upwards with greater horizontal distance but less speed than the Rush Coil. Based on the Beat Call from Mega Man 7, which allowed Beat to appear and rescue Mega Man from falling off the screen. Capable of letting Mega Man fly under Final Destination while none of his other custom moves can.

Like Link, several of Zelda's various incarnations are shown to be talented musicians. At least three of incarnations are known to be harp-players (Ocarina of Time, Skyward Sword, and Hyrule Warriors). She also shows a talent for playing wind-based instruments such as an ocarina and a pan flute. She is also been shown to have a talent for singing as well.


Mega Man Battle Network, a series primarily on the Game Boy Advance, began in 2001 as a way for the Mega Man games to branch out into the role-playing video game market and to celebrate MegaMan's 15th anniversary. This series features a Net Navi called MegaMan.EXE. Net Navis act as virtual assistants to Operators, such as the protagonist Lan, an elementary school student and future hero who uses his Net Navi to help battle computer viruses and other Internet-based threats. The game combines elements from collectible card games to create a unique fast-paced battle system. An anime series, MegaMan NT Warrior, was also produced, ending with 209 episodes and a 50-minute film adaptation. Mega Man Network Transmission, the only entry in the series released on a home console rather than a handheld, takes place chronologically between the first two Battle Network games, although it was released between the third and fourth. It is also different from other games in the Battle Network universe in that its game play reminds strongly of the Classic series.
Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
In most Zelda games, the player's life meter is represented as a line of hearts. The life meter is replenished a number of different ways, including picking up hearts left by defeated enemies or destroyed objects, fairies or springs located in specific locations, or consuming items such as potions or food. Fairies can be kept in bottles and act as extra lives, reviving the player if they run out of hearts. Players are able to extend their life meter by finding heart-shaped crystals called "Heart Containers". Full heart containers are usually received at the end of dungeons and dropped by the dungeon boss. Smaller "Pieces of Heart" are awarded for completing certain side quests or found hidden around the game world in various places, and require a certain number (usually four) to form a full heart container.
Like previous Mega Man games, the weapons are varied but not all are useful. My favorites were Bounce Man’s B. Ball, a versatile weapon you can easily aim at enemies (similar to Metal Man’s Metal Blade in Mega Man 2); Block Man’s B. Dropper to rain heavy objects down on out-of-reach enemies; and the aforementioned P. Driver for skipping puzzle areas entirely. On the other side, Fuse Man’s S. Thunder is a charge that climbs walls and has few uses, and Blast Man’s C. Blast is a slow moving, remotely-detonated bomb that is way too slow to use in any context in a fast-moving game like Mega Man 11.
The back story of The Minish Cap tells of the War of the Bound Chest. During the War of the Bound Chest, a hero clad in green clothes, the Hero of Men arose to fight the demons attacking the world. This story of the War of the Bound Chest is depicted in a series of stained glass windows beneath the Elemental Sanctuary. One of the stained glass windows depicts a Princess of Hyrule wielding the Light Force. Using the stained glass window, Vaati is able to deduce that the Light Force is currently held by the current Princess Zelda.
The traditional Mega Man boss design is another knock against the Power Gear as a useful ability. Because bosses already have vulnerabilities to certain weapons, there’s no point in amping up the weapons that already easily cut them down, and increasing the damage of weapons that barely do any is like upgrading your Nerf gun to Super Soaker. However, I found two pretty cool uses for the Power Gear. One is that Tundra Man’s T. Storm can be amplified to wipe out all enemies on screen like a more efficient Infinite Gauntlet. People watching me play in the office got a kick out of me hitting what amounted to the “nuke’em from orbit” button when frustration set in. The second is Impact Man’s P. Driver ability, which is a mid-air dash attack which is more useful for getting around because its charged form lets you zoom across the whole screen. See ya, disappearing block puzzle!
I... have never been so taken aback by the vastness of a game. You really don't need to read another review, Zelda alone is worth the price of a switch. Like if they sold this game for 300 dollars I would probably buy it. In fact, it's the only Switch game I own, and have no real plans to purchase anything else because between the original game and Master Mode, I will be getting a divorce soon so I can spend more time collecting mushrooms and climbing mountains.
Zelda has appeared in nearly all Legend of Zelda games with varying degrees of significance. The only exception to date has been The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening and The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes. It should be noted however, that she is briefly referenced in Link's Awakening, but does not make an actual appearance. According to The Adventure of Link, all princesses in Hyrule have been called Zelda since the first Princess Zelda. This would however, according to the Hyrule Historia, only extend to the Zelda in the original game as the other incarnations of Zelda are chronologically from before the tragedy.
Games can deviate from the standard format. Final Fantasy VI features relics as accessories, while Final Fantasy VIII has neither accessories nor armor, all effects typically associated with gear being abilities instead. Many games feature specific types of armor, such as head armor, body armor, arm armor or leg armor, while other games only have a single set of armor based on the character, such as Final Fantasy VII or Final Fantasy X. Armor can provide bonus abilities, such as resistances to status effects or elements, and in some games, such as Final Fantasy IX, are integral to the character growth system where characters learn new skills by equipping gear.
The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]
In our newest Youtube series, Mases takes on The Legend of Zelda’s second quest while I accompany him on commentary. It has been quite some time since Mases has played through the second quest, and I’ve never seen any of it, so this ought to be a heck of a challenge. If you’d like to follow along with this series, I’d recommend heading over to our Youtube channel and subscribing so that you can watch the next episode as soon…
Jump up ↑ "I find your protests inelegant. Not to mention irrelevant. I wish to possess your beauty, Princess Zelda of Hyrule, not all these ugly words of yours! Oh, you are going to make for a spectacular painting, my dear! [...] Haha! My lovely masterpiece! How utterly scrumptious! Dare I say, it's my best work ever!" — Yuga (A Link Between Worlds)
Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.
Though she is never actually shown using them in core Zelda games, she can use the spells Nayru's Love, Farore's Wind, and Din's Fire in the spin-off Hyrule Warriors game and the non-canon Super Smash Bros. series. Additionally Zelda is also a capable military commander in Hyrule Warriors and can manipulate light-based magic energy to create balls of light or a triangular field of light that causes light energy to erupt from the ground.
When Link goes Inside Hyrule Castle, he encounters a confrontation between Zelda and Yuga. Zelda tells Yuga that his actions must cease and asks him how many more people he intends to kidnap,[89] to which Yuga says he has been searching for all seven Sages of Hyrule.[90] Zelda then accuses him of attempting to use the Seven Sages to revive Ganon,[91] but Yuga ignores her and turns her into a Painting for her beauty.[92] He then takes her Painting to the highest point of Hyrule Castle and escapes to Lorule. In Lorule, he uses the power of the Seven Sages and Princess Zelda to revive Ganon and merges with Ganon before all the Paintings, save Zelda's, are scattered across Lorule. After Link frees the sages and assembles the Triforce, he and Zelda use it to restore the Lorulean Triforce.
Mega Man set out to stop Wily and his robots again, who had stolen the new parts developed by Dr. Light and kidnapped Roll. If the player decides to pursue Wily, Mega Man will mention that Wily's scheming has ended, and then moves in close, presumably to apprehend him. However, he then reacts in shock when he discovers that "Wily" was in fact a mechanical duplicate. If the player decides to rescue Roll, Roll will apologize for worrying Mega Man before revealing she managed to steal some energy from the Wily Robot. In Mega Man's ending, Mega Man says he will bring peace for both humans and robots, and Dr. Wily informs Mega Man that he is no different than him, as he destroyed Wily's robots. Mega Man is in disbelief with what Wily said, but Dr. Light, Roll, and Auto appear to cheer him. Proto Man also appears if he was his partner. Mega Man starts feeling better, but Wily uses their distraction to escape again, and Mega Man starts to pursue him. His cooperative mode ending with Bass has him forced into a battle with Bass shortly after stopping Wily, despite both being significantly injured due to Bass wanting to fulfill his directive, although the conclusion is never revealed. In his cooperative mode ending with Duo, he wishes Duo luck as he proceeds to leave the planet with the energy.
Typically, characters can equip armor, weapons and accessories, where armor provides defensive boosts, weapons determine the strength and type of the attacks used, and accessories provide various supporting abilities or bonuses. There are rarely optimal sets of armor or accessories, though many games feature ultimate weapons for each character, often involving sidequests to obtain them.
The bosses themselves are largely familiar, and that was disappointing. You may be surprised to learn that there hasn’t been a Torch Man before, because he is a clone of Fire Man, Heat Man, Flame Man etc. (However, his level, which is loosely summer camp-themed, is pretty cute.) Fuse Man, Tundra Man, and Blast Man all filled familiar Mega Man niches. I did like Acid Man, whose level featured PH balance (!) challenges as water went from neutral to acidic. Conversely, Bounce Man’s level is a total disaster as it uses some shaky physics to bounce Mega Man around deadly balloon-filled gauntlets, robbing you of control. Finally, Block Man is just the best: His Egyptian-like palace is filled with hieroglyphs of him triumphing over Mega Man.

Explore the wilds of Hyrule any way you like—anytime, anywhere! - Climb up towers and mountain peaks in search of new destinations, then set your own path to get there and plunge into the wilderness. Along the way, you'll battle towering enemies, hunt wild beasts and gather ingredients for the food and elixirs you'll make to sustain you on your journey. With Nintendo Switch, you can literally take your journey anywhere.
Jump up ↑ "You are already leaving this land of Hyrule, aren't you? Even though it was only a short time, I feel like I've known you forever. I'll never forget the days we spent together in Hyrule... And I believe in my heart that a day will come when I shall meet you again... Until that day comes, please... Take this..." — Princess Zelda (Majora's Mask)
Princess Zelda is one of the three most important characters of The Legend of Zelda series, which is also why her name appears in the title of every game. Princess Zelda first appeared in the original The Legend of Zelda, and has since been featured in every subsequent game, with the exception of Link's Awakening. Each incarnation of the Princess is chosen by destiny to be the keeper of the Triforce of Wisdom in their respective eras, which is the main reason why they play such an integral role in the legends of Hyrule.

Custom 2 Plant Barrier 3% (circling), 4.2% (thrown) Mega Man summons flower petal-shaped units that orbit around him. The petals are more durable than the Leaf Shield, as they do not disappear when hit and deal slightly more damage when thrown, but they move slightly slower and have less range when thrown. The move is based on Plant Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
Nintendo 3DS Mario Kart 7, released in 2011 for the Nintendo 3DS, features optional 3D stereoscopic graphics and can be played using the console's gyroscope, which allows players to race in first-person and steer vehicles simply by turning the game system. Other features unseen in previous installments include the ability to build customizable vehicles with unlockable parts such as frames or tires; retractable hang gliders, which allow players to glide through the air, skipping over parts of the track or locating new routes/shortcuts that are otherwise inaccessible; fully submersible karts; and segments of tracks that are completely underwater. The game features 4 new characters: Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen. This is also the first Mario Kart game where Shy Guy can be played as without playing in multiplayer mode. The player can play online via Nintendo Network, participating in races or battles with up to seven other players, and exchange game data with other Nintendo 3DS consoles. Two of the new courses are set on Wuhu Island from the non-Mario game series Wii Fit.
The series often features other mythological references, such as Kefka Palazzo and Sephiroth's godforms based on divinity as their final encounters in Final Fantasy VI and Final Fantasy VII. The game worlds themselves are commonly based on real-world mythology, such as Final Fantasy X and its Shinto and Buddhism influences, and the influence of Jewish mysticism in Final Fantasy VII.
One of the features of the series is the use of various power-up items obtained by driving into item boxes laid out on the course. These power-ups include mushrooms to give players a speed boost, Koopa Shells to be thrown at opponents, banana peels, and fake item boxes that can be laid on the course as hazards. The type of weapon received from an item box is influenced by the player's current position in the race.[3] For example, players lagging far behind may receive more powerful items while the leader may only receive small defensive items. Called rubber banding, this gameplay mechanism allows other players or computers a realistic chance to catch up to the leading player.
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