Super Mario Kart was the first non-platforming game to feature multiple playable characters from the Mario franchise, leading the way for not only its various sequels but also the many other spin-offs that the Mario characters have appeared in, including both sporting games (those relating to tennis, golf, baseball, and soccer) and non-sporting games (Mario Party among other series). The genre-spanning nature of the Mario franchise that was sparked off by the success of Super Mario Kart has been described as key to Mario's success and longevity, keeping fans interested despite the infrequency of the traditional Mario platforming games.[18] Mario Kart and all of the franchise's other spin-off series have helped it rise to its present status as the best-selling video game franchise of all time.
Though Capcom owns the rights to all Mega Man games and has been responsible for the development of all of his console titles, it has in the past licensed the Mega Man character to other companies for PC releases. Mega Man and Mega Man III (with no relation to the NES games of the same name) were developed by the US-based Hi-Tech Expressions, the Mega Man game published on the Game Gear by Sega, and Rockman Strategy was developed and released exclusively in China by AcerTWP. Neither title has since been regarded by Capcom as an official Mega Man series game.
The music was composed by Asuka Ohta and Ryo Nagamatsu; who both used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games alongside original material. A 46-track official soundtrack was released in December 2011 as a Club Nintendo reward in Japan.[18] The speaker on the Wii Remote is frequently used during gameplay, as sound effects like crashes and warning signals are emitting from it. During the extensive testing of the different Wii Wheel prototypes, the developers decided to have the voice actors playing the game during recording sessions.[14]

However, Cole releases his master before Link and Zelda could stop him. No longer in imprisonment, Malladus possesses Zelda's body, seeking to wreak havoc across New Hyrule and beyond. Using a specially made Phantom, Zelda aids Link in defeating Cole and forcing Malladus out of her body. With Byrne holding Malladus off, Zelda swiftly returns to her body, much to her joy. Immediately though, Byrne is defeated by Malladus, with the Demon King proceeding to use Cole's body as a new vessel. Having little time to spare, Link and Zelda perform a duet using the Spirit Flute and Zelda's sacred powers, with the Lokomo's joining in. Their combined powers significantly weaken Malladus, allowing Link and Zelda to finish him off. Soon after, Zelda joins Link in saying their farewells to the Lokomo, where they learn that Byrne will be reborn, though without the memories of past events. Afterwards, the ending credits show Zelda and Link back to New Hyrule castle, much to everyone's relief.


The success of Final Fantasy and its key role within Square Enix's business plan has served as a double-edged sword. The first movie in the franchise, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, was a box office flop with a net loss of $72-102 million,[87] and delayed the merger between Square and Enix.[88] On the other hand, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn was primarily responsible for overturning the company's financial losses at the end of 2013.[89]
Ganon, also known as Ganondorf in his humanoid form, is the main antagonist and the final boss in the majority of The Legend of Zelda games. In the series, Ganondorf is the leader of a race of desert brigands called the Gerudo, which consists entirely of female warriors save for one man born every one hundred years. He is significantly taller than other human NPCs, but his looks vary between games, often taking the form of a monstrous anthropomorphic boar. His specific motives vary from game to game, but most often his plans include him kidnapping Princess Zelda and planning to achieve domination of Hyrule and presumably the world beyond it. To this end, he seeks the Triforce, a powerful magical relic. He often possesses a portion of the Triforce called the Triforce of Power, which gives him great strength. However, it is often not enough to accomplish his ends, leading him to hunt the remaining Triforce pieces. Unlike Link, Zelda, and most other recurring characters, he is actually the same person in every game, with the exception of Four Swords Adventures, where he is a reincarnation of the original. In each game the battles with him are different and he fights using different styles. The game Skyward Sword indicates that Ganon is a reincarnation of an evil deity known as Demise.

However, after Mega Man defeated the second set of four Robot Masters, he made his way to where Ballade was waiting and defeated him for a second time, acquiring the Ballade Cracker, which he used to blast his way out of Wily's crumbling fortress. Mega Man made his way to the Wily Battleship and defeated Wily, but was trapped in the fortress when Wily activated a self-destruct mechanism. Ballade, realizing his mistakes, decides to sacrifice himself at the last minute to save Mega Man in the end.
Nintendo is likely to have more mobile titles in the works. The company originally planned to have released five smartphone games by 2017, but only Super Mario Run, Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and the ill-fated Miitomo social app have made it out so far. Last year The Wall Street Journal reported that Nintendo was working on a Legend of Zelda mobile title.
However, Wily's frequent false repentances have become a constant frustration to Mega Man who appears to developing less patience with him, something that came to a head in the course of Mega Man 7 where he contemplated killing him, though ultimately decided against it. He further pointed out Wily's previous false repentances at the end of Mega Man 9, showing his diminishing patience, however he nonetheless assists him when he becomes ill in Mega Man 10.
So I'll start with the gameplay itself. It leaves behind the turn based system of yesteryear. It has more a hack and slash feel to it. There are some new dynamics to the game such as having three computer controlled teammates fighting alongside you in real time. You can still input your own commands when you want. Battles are set to an aggro system that's pretty similar to the one found in Final Fantasy XII. After each battle, you gain experience, and you can allocate where you would like your experience to go.
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]
I feel like there is less cheap death compared to previous installments, but it makes itself more of an endurance match to get to the boss. I really enjoy each stage having its own thought out mini boss also and the fact that you don't spawn right in front of the door when you die. You instead have to work your way back without losing too much health so you can make it through the fight while still making a couple errors.
Featuring characters and settings from the TV series, this fleetingly entertaining comic only ran for four issues. Although Zelda's feelings for Link are made quite clear, there is another element at play here: her duty to the Triforce, which must come before her own needs and desires. When Link is corrupted by the Triforce of Power in one story, this Zelda briefly possesses his Triforce of Courage, which will not reside with one who uses Power without Wisdom.
While I can overlook and even grudgingly appreciate the graphics, it’s the sound that is Mega Man 11’s biggest oversight. For a series so famous for its tunes, the sedate, repetitive, techno background is a real letdown: Why not just use cool, retro-sounding chiptunes like the rest of the games if you don’t have any strong new musical ideas? Mega Man 11 also has some terrifically bad voice acting, which I actually got a kick out of -- but eventually, the repetitive callouts (Speed Gear!) got on my coworkers’ nerves, prompting them to politely ask me to turn it down. You can choose to view subtitles and hear what few dialogue lines there are in Japanese, but if you did that you’d be missing out on Mega Man’s new, rich baritone -- only in English! I guess after 10 games in 31 years he really has become a Man.
 Phantom Slash has been heavily reworked. The Phantom armor now assembles itself behind Zelda rather than appearing fully formed out of a portal in front of her. It is now a single-press chargeable move; Pressing B again will cause the incomplete armor to attack at its current charge level. The move has six charge levels, each resulting in a different attack:

Other games in the series deviate further from the typical formula. Final Fantasy XII has player characters learn License Points (a variation of the ability points system) to spend on a License Board to purchase "licenses" to wield different equipment, use different spells and boost stats, with total freedom. In the International Zodiac Job System re-release the License Boards are based on jobs. In Final Fantasy X characters learn abilities based on a Sphere Grid that begins linearly but the player can eventually branch the grid out further, and potentially max all stats with various items usable to alter and improve Sphere Grid growth. Another example featuring items for growing skills is Final Fantasy VIII where magic spells are collected into an inventory similar to items, and acquired through refine or draw abilities, with other abilities learned via ability points from the character's equipped Guardian Forces.
The game won multiple Wii-specific awards from IGN in its 2008 video game awards, including Best Racing Game[46] and Best Online Multiplayer Game.[47] IGN also nominated it for Best Family Game for the Wii.[48] The game was ranked ninth in Nintendo Power's "Best of the Decade."[49] It also won the award for "Favorite Video Game" at the 2010 Kids' Choice Awards.[50] Guinness World Records has awarded Mario Kart Wii with a record for being the best-selling racing video game of all time.[51]
Six years after the events of A Link to the Past, Hyrule is enjoying a time of peace and tranquility, but Princess Zelda suffers from a dark, recurring dream showing a shadow over a temple; a premonition of evil to come. One day, she witnesses a mysterious and brilliant light in the sky to the east. Aginah, the younger brother of the wise man Sahasrahla and now living in his old hideout near the Eastern Palace also witnesses such a light, and travels to investigate. There he finds a strange youth lying on the ground. Zelda, also following the light, meets up with Aginah, and they both carry the child to rest in Sahasrahla's hideout. Confused by the youth's unusual clothes, they believe the child not to hail from Kakariko Village. Speaking to Aginah while the youngster sleeps, Zelda learns that his brother Sahasrahla had also sensed danger surrounding Hyrule and had left the land to find the hero, Link. While Link has not yet returned, Zelda senses that if this new youth was endowed with courage, he or she may be the Hero of Light. Zelda then sets of for Hyrule Castle before sending Aginah to find the Book of Mudora while she speaks to the Fortune Teller. Aginah and the hero travel to the Sanctuary at the foot of the mountain, but Zelda follows, claiming she had another prophetic dream, this time of her holding the Book of Mudora on top of Death Mountain. Zelda insists on traveling with the hero to the summit of the mountain, as she is the only one who can read the Book of Mudora. During their quest to obtain the final two tablets and reach the summit, the Fortune Teller sees the King of Evil in a vision. Ganon's malice had kept his spirit alive despite the destruction of his body. It was this lingering evil power that had drawn the Hero of Light into the land of Hyrule, and upon the summit the hero travels once more into another world to engage in a desperate final battle with the Demon King in a new version of Ganon's Tower. Ganon desires the power of the Hero of Light to be fully reborn, but is finally destroyed using the Silver Arrows once more.

Zelda's B button attacks lend themselves to this defensive style of play as well. Din's Fire is a long range setup attack allowing the player to control a guided fire "mine," which explodes upon release. Nayru's Love is a crystal shield which not only reflects projectiles, but damages nearby enemies and pushes them away. Farore's Wind is Zelda's third jump, a teleport move which can be directed and has enormous range, but leaves her somewhat vulnerable. If Zelda invokes the teleport while physically touching an enemy character, that character will take damage, but this is very hard to pull off in practice. Fans may remember her three magic attacks as the same ones Link acquired in Ocarina of Time, albeit with quite different applications. Instead of a fourth attack, her final command is the transformation to Sheik.

I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.


In 1994, near the end of the Famicom's lifespan, the original Famicom game was re-released in cartridge format.[60] A modified version, BS Zelda no Densetsu, was released for the Super Famicom's satellite-based expansion, Satellaview, on August 6, 1995, in Japan. A second Satellaview game, BS Zelda no Densetsu MAP2 was released for the Satellaview on December 30, 1995. Both games featured rearranged dungeons, an altered overworld, and new voice-acted plot-lines.[61]


Perfect game for all ages and anyone that comes over the house can pick it up really easily. My three year old got tired of the other games I had for the wii and I bought this one. He learned how to drive on his second try. He's still not coordinated enough to do everything well but he can complete a race, pick up items and use them. He's used a lot of the tracks and has a preference for some and even found a couple of short cuts on his own that I use now. Mom, dad, and son can play together and have fun since the races are short and it's easy enough to switch out games, cars, and characters. There are a good amount of characters to choose from. I do wish there were a couple more options on game types but this game is still really fun and it's my son's new favorite.
A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]
As they are sworn to defend the Kingdom and serve the Royal Family of Hyrule, the Hyrulean Soldiers are loyal protectors to Zelda and her family, along with other groups sworn to serve the royal court such as the Knights of Hyrule and the Sheikah. However, the Hyrulean Soldiers are often depicted as ineffective against the forces of evil that threaten Hyrule, and sometimes have fallen prey to their evil influence. Ironically, they often serve as obstacles preventing Link from meeting Zelda, though mainly due to their ignorance of his status as the legendary hero.

"The Legend of Zelda Theme" is a recurring piece of music that was created for the first game of the franchise. The composer and sound director of the series, Koji Kondo, initially planned to use Maurice Ravel's Boléro as the game's title theme, but was forced to change it when he learned, late in the game's development cycle, that the copyright for the orchestral piece had not yet expired. As a result, Kondo wrote a new arrangement of the overworld theme within one day.[7] The "Zelda Theme" has topped ScrewAttack's "Top Ten Videogame Themes Ever" list.[8]
×