Fi's spirit may continue to exist within the Master Sword in Breath of the Wild. Princess Zelda reveals to the Great Deku Tree that the Master Sword told her that her destiny was not finished, it convinced her to seal Calamity Ganon herself. In his vision after removing the sword, Link sees Zelda speaking to the Master Sword as if it was a person. She told the Master Sword that its master (Link) would come for it, like Fi whose spirit slumbers within the sword and refers to Link as "master" in Skyward Sword.


But there was a lot to like about Skyward Sword, too. The game's impressionist painting aesthetic, its memorable Skyloft village, the fantastically over-the-top villain Ghirahim and scene-stealing Groose. Skyward Sword really embraced its placement as the first Zelda game chronologically, and it revelled in providing Easter eggs and lore-heavy moments to retroactively insert itself as a prequel to later instalments.

Guinness World Records listed 6 records set by the Mario Kart series, including "First Console Kart Racing Game", "Best Selling Racing Game" and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise". Guinness World Records ranked the original Super Mario Kart number 1 on the list of top 50 console games of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[13]
The Mega Man X series has been positively received. The first Mega Man X game was widely acclaimed by critics since its release. Gaming magazines in the United States and Europe including Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), GamePro, Game Players, Nintendo Power, Super Play, and the German version of Total! consistently lauded the game's visuals, audio, control, and overall gameplay.[19][20][21][22][23][24][25] Game Players summarized Mega Man X as "a near-perfect cart with classic gameplay, excellent graphics and sound and tons of hidden items and power-ups".[24] Nintendo Power stated that the game had "great control and fun" along with "challenging play".[20]
@ryancraddock With Switch, compared to other systems the physical versus digital matter is a lot more significant since there's very limited space for games at high cost, digitally, one has to be choosy with digital acquisitions. Ultimately physical buyers are going to be able to buy a lot more games. And WoFF is a relatively large game in terms of SD usage.

The Final Fantasy series' settings range from traditional fantasy to science fantasy. Each game focuses on one world that vary drastically in backstory, technological advancement and culture. Humans are the dominant sapient species, with chocobos, moogles and several enemy species being the most commonly recurring non-humans. The worlds often feature Crystals that throughout early settings were magical phenomena fundamental to the elements of the worlds, but in others have different roles.

Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.

The Mario Kart series has been referenced twice in the Paper Mario role-playing game series. Luigi references it in an "adventure" of his which he recounts between chapters of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where in the third of his stories, he states that he visited a location called "Circuit Break Island" where kart races are organized every day. Later, in Paper Mario: Color Splash, once all six Big Paint Stars have been retrieved, Luigi drives his kart on Rainbow Road to transport Mario to Bowser's castle to defeat him and restore peace to Prism Island; when Bowser (who has been transformed by black paint) is reverted to normal upon his defeat, he asks Mario if they have a kart race scheduled. Additionally, several stages based on Mario Kart have appeared in the Super Smash Bros. series: Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS features a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, as well as reusing the Mario Circuit stage from Brawl. Although not actually shown in the first Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the franchise (which at that time had been composed of just Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64) was alluded to in a promotional ad for the game in Nintendo Power, where it mentioned that Nintendo's famous cast had previously "raced go-karts" when announcing their new role in the fighting ring.
Mega Man's first animated appearance was as a main character in the 1989 series Captain N: The Game Master, which features a myriad of characters that had appeared on Nintendo consoles up until that time. They all aid the title character, Captain N, in his quest to save the world of Videoland, encountering many villains, including Mega Man's own enemy Dr. Wily. Mega Man is green and is voiced in this series by Doug Parker. His character also has a speech impediment and a tendency to add the word "mega" in front of words for emphasis.
For the first few installments a key plot point was the Crystals. Each world would feature four, each representing the four elements, and without them the world would deteriorate. The antagonists often begin by destroying or stealing these Crystals for power, and the party would fail to prevent them and be forced to foil their grander scheme later. This plot was abandoned in Final Fantasy VI, and while the games would still feature Crystals, they often did not have the same importance.

Though the MMO releases, Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XIV, are members of the main series, with the exception of some abilities, some equipment, and the job system, they deviate from the traditional gameplay format due to their nature as games of a different genre. The MMOs are free-roaming with enemies appearing on the field, rarely use traditional menu systems (instead abilities are selected from a player-customized list) and use various features typical of MMO games. Being multiplayer games they include player interaction as well as trading between players. The player does not control a party, but multiple players can form one to fight in dungeons and against bosses.


In 1990, a junior novel version of Mega Man 2 was released as part of the Worlds of Power novel series. Mega Man is turned human by Dr. Light during an accident in a machine designed to clone Mega Man. Instead of a Mega Buster, human Mega Man uses a hand gun and instead of being able to copy the robot master's weapons, he instead takes them off of their arms. For some reason being human does not affect him much and he is still able to consume E-drinks (Energy Tanks) and gain a power boost. The book follows the general plot of Mega Man 2 and even provides game hints at the end of some chapters.
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
Some time before the Great Calamity, the Yiga Clan even attempted to assassinate Zelda before she could awaken her sealing magic. They would have succeeded, had it not been for Link`s intervention. After the Great Calamity, with Zelda sealing herself with Ganon in Hyrule Castle, the Yiga Clan focused on hunting down Link and any of Zelda's surviving allies instead.
Mega Man will be returning along with all the past playable characters as part of this new game. In addition, his Mega Legends Final Smash has been updated to include both Proto Man and Bass as part of the attack. Unlike the previous game, Mega Man is no longer part of the starting roster and needs to be unlocked, since only the 8 characters from the original Super Smash Bros. will serve as the starting roster.[13]
The Mega Man X series has been positively received. The first Mega Man X game was widely acclaimed by critics since its release. Gaming magazines in the United States and Europe including Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), GamePro, Game Players, Nintendo Power, Super Play, and the German version of Total! consistently lauded the game's visuals, audio, control, and overall gameplay.[19][20][21][22][23][24][25] Game Players summarized Mega Man X as "a near-perfect cart with classic gameplay, excellent graphics and sound and tons of hidden items and power-ups".[24] Nintendo Power stated that the game had "great control and fun" along with "challenging play".[20]
Dr. Wily once again sets his sights on world domination. This time, he revives several of his Robot Masters based on those of Light's designs, giving them another chance to do battle with Mega Man. Four Robot Masters rampage across the globe, so Dr. Light sends Mega Man out to stop them. Once they are taken down, Mega Man heads to Wily's fortress only to discover that four more Robot Masters await him there. To make matters worse, Dr. Wily has constructed a new powerful robot, a Mega Man Killer known as Enker. Enker has the ability to absorb Mega Man's shots with his lance and return a powerful blast of energy at him with his Mirror Buster; however, Enker is defeated, and Mega Man chases Wily to the Wily Station, using Enker's own Mirror Buster to defeat him.
Auch Comics, Bücher und weitere Zelda Fanartikel erfreuen sich seitdem größter Beliebtheit und verhelfen der Serie so zu ihrem hohen Bekanntheitsgrad. Hervorzuheben ist hierbei vor allem das Geschichtsbuch „Hyrule Historia“, das 2011 zum 25. Jubiläum der Reihe erschien und einen Querschnitt durch die erfolgreiche Geschichte von Nintendo, aber auch ihrer faszinierenden Welt bietet.
Skyward Sword shook up the series in other ways, too. It removed Zelda's traditional large overworld, and instead used smaller, separate areas designed to be played multiple times, albeit with radical changes for each visit. And then there was Fi, the magical spirit which lived in Link's famous Master Sword. Many fans compared her chattiness to that of Ocarina of Time's Navi - and not in a good way.
As usual, Mega Man destroys the latest incarnation of the Wily Machine, leaving Wily on the ground begging for forgiveness. As Mega Man berates Wily for trying the same old ruse after so many failures, he is taken over by the Evil Energy in Wily's machine as the tower collapsed around them. However, Duo saved Mega Man and destroyed the evil energy within him. He leaves before Mega Man wakes up, but Proto Man informs him of Duo's final message to the Blue Bomber: "Thank you".
Shigeru Miyamoto stated that the Princess Zelda's name originated from Zelda Fitzgerald, the wife of the acclaimed author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.[156] The name "Zelda" ultimately derives from "Griselda," which may come from the Germanic elements gris ("gray") and hild ("battle"). Griselda itself means "happy", "lucky", or "blessed", while Grizelda means "endless patience".

Initially, the player assumes control as Zelda, although it is possible to start a round as Sheik by holding down the A button following selection of a stage until the round begins. Zelda is somewhat slow but is rather graceful and agile, and her special attacks, if they connect, are extremely powerful—boosted by magic, if the sparkles and flashes of light are any indication. Her aerial movements and dodging skill, as well as her attacks' high priority and strong impact, make her an ideal counter-defensive character. She is very much built for defensive attacking, but her moves leave her very open if timed incorrectly, and if attacked, her gracefulness can work against her. She has a light frame and is easily sent flying.


As pointed out by others, Zelda has many attributes that attracts allies. While not always a stable relationship from the start, she has gained many good friends throughout various games. Most of her friends deeply respect her as the princess of Hyrule and do not doubt her judgment. Her kindness is enough to turn even some of her enemies into allies.

"I had a dream... In the dream, dark storm clouds were billowing over the land of Hyrule... But suddenly, a ray of light shot out of the forest, parted the clouds and lit up the ground... The light turned into a figure holding a green and shining stone, followed by a fairy... I know this is a prophecy that someone would come from the forest... Yes, I thought you might be the one... Oh, I'm sorry! I got carried away with my story and didn't even properly introduce myself! I am Zelda, Princess of Hyrule."
The next game, Link's Awakening, is the first Zelda for Nintendo's Game Boy handheld, and the first set outside Hyrule and to exclude Princess Zelda. It was released in 1993, and re-released, in full color, as a launch game for the Game Boy Color in 1998 as Link's Awakening DX. This re-release features additions such as an extra color-based dungeon and a photo shop that allows interaction with the Game Boy Printer.
Gifted with a perfectly serviceable faux-3D makeover, and a plot that couldn’t matter less if it tried, 11 once again pits its robot hero against the forces of the cartoonishly nasty Dr. Wily. Said battle comes in the form of eight new stages to run and gun through, with eight new bosses lurking at their ends. Despite boilerplate names like Block Man, Impact Man, and Torch Man, this is easily the most colorful bunch of baddies the series has ever offered up, varying wildly in size, and featuring sharp little details like the electrodes poking jauntily out of Fuse Man’s silhouette. That same love has been lavished on the way they fight, too: Rather than execute a few simple patterns of jumps and attacks, each boss battle is now a multi-phase affair, with enemies tossing out super moves and even the occasional full-on transformation. All of these flashy theatrics—which put a welcome edge onto the long-standard process of learning and overcoming a boss—are empowered by the Double Gear system, the game’s one big contribution to the Mega Man canon. A fancy way of saying “short-lived bursts of extra power or speed,” the Gears’ powers aren’t just confined to your enemies. They’re also the biggest tool in Mega Man’s new arsenal—and in the game’s efforts to justify its existence as more than just a pleasant but brief nostalgic stint.
Mega Man's first television appearances were produced for the American market and were based on the classic series. First was Captain N: The Game Master (1989-91), a show that took place in a universe that was made up up many different Nintendo games. It featured Mega Man as a main character and also featured Dr. Wiley as one of the antagonists. This was followed by Mega Man (1994-95), the first series to be based in the Mega Man universe.[citation needed]
Mega Man does have some notable flaws, however: While Mega Man has a good amount of attacks with good knockback, the majority of his kill moves are considered situational, difficult to set up, or and/or are easy to punish. As such, he has a more difficult time killing than other characters and it requires good reads to successfully finish off opponents. Characters that have a move that either reflects projectiles or can nullify them (such as Fox or Lady Palutena) can also prove to be an annoyance for him due to his over-reliance on projectiles to combo opponents and bait reactions and it can render his Forward Smash (one of his better kill moves) unreliable, though this can be worked around by firing the Mega Buster twice at a time, and most reflectors are punishable if baited and he can still grab them. Although Mega Man can effectively zone opponents at medium ranges with the Mega Buster, most of his other moves are fairly laggy or gimmicky and his only reliable tool in close range is his grab, and as such faster characters (such as Greninja or Captain Falcon) can bypass his zoning more easily and put work on him in closer ranges and due to his above average weight and falling speed, Mega Man is somewhat easy for these characters to combo once they get in, assuming that they have any combo potential.

The series has overall enjoyed high critical acclaim, with varying success. Of the main series, six titles have reached a Metacritic score of or above 90: Final Fantasy VI at 91,[29] Final Fantasy VII at 92,[30] Final Fantasy VIII at 90,[31] Final Fantasy IX at 94,[32] Final Fantasy X at 92,[33] and Final Fantasy XII at 92.[34] The only game to reach a Metacritic score below 70 was the original Final Fantasy XIV launch at 49,[35], though the subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, reached a score of 83.[36] The most critically acclaimed release was Final Fantasy IX,[32] while the poorest received by critics was the original Final Fantasy XIV.[35] Spinoffs, likewise, have enjoyed varied critical reception, though lower than that of the main series. Many spinoffs have been well received, such as Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions,[37] Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy[38] and Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call.[39] Many other spinoffs have been poorly received, such as Final Fantasy: All the Bravest,[40] Dirge of Cerberus -Final Fantasy VII-,[41] and Final Fantasy IV: The After Years.[42]


I feel like they focused too much on making the game new and exciting rather than balanced and fun but they still did pretty good at throwing everything together. It has tons of tracks, vehicles, characters, and is probably the most re-playable version of the series because there is so much stuff to unlock. I unlocked everything in the game using a stock character and vehicle so the unlocked stuff isn't overpowering like in past games. The unlock-able characters and carts seem well placed and often help you with your playing style. For example you unlock the fast characters while trying to do time trials or you get the agile carts from gold on the harder tracks.

The Final Fantasy series has also featured a more basic, traditional turn-based system, such as the original Final Fantasy through to Final Fantasy III that do not rely on time, but the player and the enemy party take turns executing commands. Final Fantasy X features a Conditional Turn-Based Battle system where turns are taken based on an Act List, the turn order depending on the units' stats and statuses, and commands being ranked usually with stronger commands having longer "recovery time" until the unit can act again.
Upon defeating Terra, Mega Man finds out that his nemesis, Dr. Wily, was ordering the Stardroids to dominate Earth. Mega Man sets off to the mad scientist's new base, the Wily Star to stop him. In the base, Mega Man has rematches with the Mega Man Killers, before facing off against the eight Stardroids once more (strangely, Terra does not appear again). After Wily is stopped once again himself, he releases a mysterious and ancient robot called Sunstar to destroy Mega Man. However, Sunstar disobeys and attacks Wily instead, and then turns his attention to Mega Man. The hero wins the battle and tries to convince Sunstar to be repaired by Dr. Light. However, while Sunstar would like to see such a world, he is already too badly damaged, and minutes later he explodes, taking the Wily Star with him. Mega Man escapes using Rush, and in the game's epilogue he again walks through the field seen in the opening sequence, pondering the recent events, when Wily makes one last, unsuccessful attempt to attack him. The game ends with Mega Man chasing Wily off the screen.

The music was composed by Asuka Ohta and Ryo Nagamatsu; who both used new interpretations of the familiar melodies from earlier games alongside original material. A 46-track official soundtrack was released in December 2011 as a Club Nintendo reward in Japan.[18] The speaker on the Wii Remote is frequently used during gameplay, as sound effects like crashes and warning signals are emitting from it. During the extensive testing of the different Wii Wheel prototypes, the developers decided to have the voice actors playing the game during recording sessions.[14]
Since the release of its first title in 1987, the FINAL FANTASY series has become a global phenomenon due to its cutting edge graphics technology, unique and distinctive world settings, and rich storylines. It has since sold over 142,000,000 copies (package/downloads). With 87 titles, the series was awarded the "most prolific role-playing game series" by the Guinness World Records in 2017.
Custom 2 Beat 0% Mega Man summons his robotic bird companion Beat, which he grabs onto as he lifts him upwards with greater horizontal distance but less speed than the Rush Coil. Based on the Beat Call from Mega Man 7, which allowed Beat to appear and rescue Mega Man from falling off the screen. Capable of letting Mega Man fly under Final Destination while none of his other custom moves can.
A follow-up to the Mega Man Battle Network series and released on the Nintendo DS, Star Forces's launch commemorated the 20th anniversary of the Mega Man franchise. The Star Force games are very similar to the Battle Network games, and also takes place roughly 200 years later in the timeline. Network technology has progressed with electromagnetic wave technology to connect the world via radio waves. The series stars a timid boy named Geo Stelar and an extraterrestrial EM-wave being named Omega-Xis who can merge into an EM-Human known as "Mega Man," allowing the player to explore both the real world and the EM-world. Although each game has a different set of antagonists, they are usually EM-beings that are able to merge with humans to create new threats. The gameplay is very similar to the Battle Network series with an over-the-shoulder battle system and more simplified collectible card game elements, as well as faster-paced battle mechanics. An anime based on this series began airing on TV Tokyo in October 2006 for 76 episodes.
↑ Jump up to: 29.0 29.1 "We must stop him from freeing himself from the seal that imprisons him. At any cost... That is why I intend to remain here in this time and place... To sustain the seal as best as I can. As long as I continue this vigil, we may be able to prevent the demon king from fully reviving himself in our own time." — Zelda (Skyward Sword)
However, after Mega Man defeated the second set of four Robot Masters, he made his way to where Ballade was waiting and defeated him for a second time, acquiring the Ballade Cracker, which he used to blast his way out of Wily's crumbling fortress. Mega Man made his way to the Wily Battleship and defeated Wily, but was trapped in the fortress when Wily activated a self-destruct mechanism. Ballade, realizing his mistakes, decides to sacrifice himself at the last minute to save Mega Man in the end.
Explore the wilds of Hyrule any way you like—anytime, anywhere! - Climb up towers and mountain peaks in search of new destinations, then set your own path to get there and plunge into the wilderness. Along the way, you'll battle towering enemies, hunt wild beasts and gather ingredients for the food and elixirs you'll make to sustain you on your journey. With Nintendo Switch, you can literally take your journey anywhere.

Mega Man was seen as a very obscure and unorthodox character since the game's release. His strange playstyle mainly comprised of projectiles always saw a large topic of debate for him, though the general consensus was always of him being at least a mid-tier character. Alongside very limited tournament representation and tournament results, he would at first rank 28th on the first 4BR tier list. However, his popularity would become stronger after game updates nerfed Sheik, Zero Suit Samus and Bayonetta, and his tournament representation, while limited, saw strong results from smashers like ScAtt, Smasher1001, and most notably Kameme, who would travel to the USA to compete at EVO 2016 and get 2nd place at the tournament. This spike in tournament results allowed him to be seen much more favorably and allowed him to rank 15th on the second tier list, reassesing him as a high-tier character and gaining the third largest rise between the first and second tier lists.
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide. 
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