A follow-up to the Mega Man Battle Network series and released on the Nintendo DS, Star Forces's launch commemorated the 20th anniversary of the Mega Man franchise. The Star Force games are very similar to the Battle Network games, and also takes place roughly 200 years later in the timeline. Network technology has progressed with electromagnetic wave technology to connect the world via radio waves. The series stars a timid boy named Geo Stelar and an extraterrestrial EM-wave being named Omega-Xis who can merge into an EM-Human known as "Mega Man," allowing the player to explore both the real world and the EM-world. Although each game has a different set of antagonists, they are usually EM-beings that are able to merge with humans to create new threats. The gameplay is very similar to the Battle Network series with an over-the-shoulder battle system and more simplified collectible card game elements, as well as faster-paced battle mechanics. An anime based on this series began airing on TV Tokyo in October 2006 for 76 episodes.
The bosses themselves are largely familiar, and that was disappointing. You may be surprised to learn that there hasn’t been a Torch Man before, because he is a clone of Fire Man, Heat Man, Flame Man etc. (However, his level, which is loosely summer camp-themed, is pretty cute.) Fuse Man, Tundra Man, and Blast Man all filled familiar Mega Man niches. I did like Acid Man, whose level featured PH balance (!) challenges as water went from neutral to acidic. Conversely, Bounce Man’s level is a total disaster as it uses some shaky physics to bounce Mega Man around deadly balloon-filled gauntlets, robbing you of control. Finally, Block Man is just the best: His Egyptian-like palace is filled with hieroglyphs of him triumphing over Mega Man.

A reader brought to my attention this translation of an interview between one of the developers of the original Mega Man games (“A.K” in the credits) and one of the (probably more well-known) artists for some of the Rockman manga (he did Megamix, among many others). What I find amusing about this arrangement is ordinarily you would expect both of these men to be interviewed, rather than one of them interviewing the other.
Mario Kart Wii is a kart racing game featuring single-player and multiplayer modes. The players control of one of many selectable Mario franchise characters and participate in races or battles using karts or bikes on courses thematically based on locations from the Mario franchise. During gameplay, the player views the action from a third-person perspective that tracks the player from behind his or her kart. The player can perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, drifting, slipstreaming, and wheelies (bikes only).[3]
Princess Zelda appears in the spinoff Hyrule Warriors as a playable character. She wields Rapiers that can transform into a Bow of Light, Batons that can manipulate wind and lightning, and Dominion Rods that allow her to control Owl Statue and Hammer Guardian Statue. Her appearances from Ocarina of Time, Twilight Princess, and Skyward Sword will be alternate costumes available via downloadable content. Other downloadable content gives her recolors of her default look to resemble Hilda from A Link Between Worlds and her A Link to the Past incarnation artwork to unlock, a costume that makes her look like Ilia and the Dominion Rod is added as a weapon for her to use. In the Hyrule Warriors: Definitive Edition, Princess Zelda gains a new alternate costume based on her Breath of the Wild incarnation.
Don’t be too afraid, however: While tough stretches in previous Mega Man games forced you to learn patterns and hone your skills, in Mega Man 11 you can stock up on powerups to take the edge off. For every challenge, there’s a consumable item to snatch you out of a pit, refill your energy, or protect you from spikes. You just have to grind a bit to collect bolts and purchase your way to success. Of course, grinding is not fun, so it’s only when I got really annoyed with replaying a lengthy level that I went shopping.
But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
Jump up ↑ "You are already leaving this land of Hyrule, aren't you? Even though it was only a short time, I feel like I've known you forever. I'll never forget the days we spent together in Hyrule... And I believe in my heart that a day will come when I shall meet you again... Until that day comes, please... Take this..." — Princess Zelda (Majora's Mask)
Happy Monday, everybody! I know I keep forgetting to post a Caption Contest every week, but I could not, under any circumstance, miss this week of all weeks. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate releases this Friday, and I’m sure the entire Nintendo fanbase is looking for a way to alleviate the anticipation. So why not let the Zelda Dungeon Caption Contest distract you for a little while as you wait for Ultimate to hit store shelves?
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, a remaster of the original GameCube game, was released by Nintendo on September 20, 2013, digitally on the Nintendo eShop in North America with a retail release on September 26 in Japan, October 4 in North America and Europe, and October 5 in Australia. A month later, Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS, which takes place in the same setting as A Link to the Past.[92][93]
Guinness World Records listed 6 records set by the Mario Kart series, including "First Console Kart Racing Game", "Best Selling Racing Game" and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise". Guinness World Records ranked the original Super Mario Kart number 1 on the list of top 50 console games of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[13]
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