The Fallen Hero Timeline is the timeline in which Link, the Hero of Time, despite his best efforts, was defeated by Ganondorf in the final battle. This turn of events created the timeline containing A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons, Oracle of Ages, Link's Awakening, A Link Between Worlds, Tri Force Heroes, The Legend of Zelda, and The Adventure of Link.
There is one significant advantage to playing on Switch, however: You can totally cheat with amiibo! Scanning an amiibo while Mega Man 11 is paused instantly fills your health or weapon bars, or it might even give you a 1-Up, but it’s limited in that you can only scan a single amiibo once a day, and bonuses max out at 20 per day. (You can change your clock to get around this.) In a brutally hard game, this is a pretty fun (though potentially expensive) way to bend the rules.

Throughout the NES' lifespan, Capcom built a Mega Man narrative that plays with heavy philosophical themes that may not be noticed by casual players. For example, unlike other robots, Mega Man was created with the ability to turn himself off. This grants Mega Man with a special level of autonomy and places him above other robots. This autonomy is an honor as well as a burden. While other robots were made for a specific job and can be controlled, having no need for an "off switch", Mega Man is free to make his own judgments, and must find purpose in life through the choices he makes. As Mega Man focuses on action, Capcom rarely displays these philosophical dilemmas in the games, but existential concepts about "what makes a person," help color the fiction and remain an important component of the series.[6][7]

NGamer, however, claimed that the tracks are too big for local multiplayer matches. Also, IGN criticized the rubber band AI in the 150cc races of the Grand Prix[25] and NGamer UK was disappointed that Battle mode can now only be played in teams; no free-for-all option is offered which removes the 'last man standing' element of previous Mario Kart Battle modes. Reviewers such as GameTrailers and IGN also commented that it is easy to fall from first place to last by being continuously attacked by several weapons, many of which are unavoidable, leading to a certain amount of luck in racing. This makes it more accessible for beginners, but can be extremely discouraging for skilled players.[22][25] GameSpot also noted that "nostalgia doesn't save most of the classic courses from being boring."[23]
Settings often contain elements based on real-world mythology, and the series features many allusions to religion. A notable example are ancient mythological creatures that function as summons, and have various different roles within the game lores. Espers from Final Fantasy VI are a magical race that once lived alongside humans until a war wiped most of them out. Aeons in Final Fantasy X are the physical realizations of the dreams of the fayth, and summoners use them to battle Sin. Many games featuring summoned monsters do not have them as a named race, or give them a key role within the lore, the summons being merely abilities to be used in battle.
The controls are tight and easy to learn. I recommend buying extra wheel, but I would stick to the official, original Nintendo brand, I tried with cheaper versions, but none compared. Learning to control the karts with the wheel is easy and in no time you'll be dropping banana peels and throwing shells at your oponents. Even my wife, who is not a gamer by any means, was able to pick this up and enjoy it, she even beat me and the kids a couple of times.
The celebrated Mega Man X series comes to Nintendo Switch! Play as Mega Man X -the powerful evolution of classic fighting robot Mega Man -as he battles a variety of deadly bosses known as Mavericks in eight exhilarating action-platformer games. Mega Man X Legacy Collection includes the legendary 16-bit titles and the series' exciting foray into 32-bits: Mega Man X, Mega Man X2, Mega Man X3, and Mega Man X4. The heroic robot grows stronger as he takes down Mavericks and steals their weapons, and also has the ability to dash and wall jump for thrilling, fast-paced combat. Mega Man X's mysterious friend, Zero, also joins the fray as a playable character later in this collection.
Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.
Neutral special Default Metal Blade 3% (usage), 5% (as item) A spinning saw blade projectile that can be thrown in one of eight different directions. The blade can be picked up and thrown by players like a regular item, and it deals greater damage upon being thrown a second time. Mega Man cannot throw another Metal Blade until his previous one disappears. Its fair amount of utility makes this Mega Man's most useful tool for edgeguarding, approaching and spacing, and can even initiate shield break combos. The move is based on Metal Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.
Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)

Not much is known about Zelda's family; they are rarely mentioned or seen in-game. The king and the prince who were related to Zelda in The Adventure of Link are never even named—their actions merely provide an explanation for Zelda and the Triforce's conditions. It does seem though, that the King deeply trusted his daughter, as hinted in the prologue. It is also stated that Zelda's brother, despite his actions, did care for his sister and was devastated when he realized what his actions caused to her. The next time any known interaction between Zelda and a member of her family is mentioned is in Ocarina of Time; where the King of Hyrule (who is also Zelda's father) appears as an unseen character. The only thing that is even hinted about their relationship in that game though, is that the King did not seem to take all of his daughter's words seriously, which caused his downfall in the Adult Timeline and Fallen Hero Timeline.
Despite these advantages, Mega Man is not without flaws. His grounded mobility is comparatively poor, with his dashing speed in particular being the 13th slowest in the game. This leaves Mega Man at a disadvantage against characters with better mobility, such as Sheik and Fox. Mega Man's melee attacks also have short range overall despite their extensive utility, causing him to struggle up close against characters with disjointed range like Marth, Link, and Shulk, while the high ending lag on his attacks puts more stress on this flaw. Mega Man's above average weight and falling speed also makes him an easy target for combos and juggles. Finally, Mega Man's projectile-heavy playstyle is also his biggest weakness, as he is heavily affected by powershielding, reflectors, absorbers, and other anti-projectile tools, which can shut down both his approach and defense options.
Various artbooks and source books have been released for many years in Japan, often including conceptual artwork, interviews with production staff, and background information on the storyline and concepts that are not present within the games themselves. One of the most well-known is the Rockman Perfect Memories sourcebook released in 2002 which first confirmed the presence of an alternate timeline (for Battle Network), as well as exactly where the Legends series fit into the fictional Mega Man universe.
Recorded in March 2017 at the famed Dvorak Hall of the Rudolfinum in Prague (Czech Republic) and at AWR Music Studio in Chicago (USA), the Distant Worlds Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus, under the direction of GRAMMY Award-winning conductor Arnie Roth, delivers the precision and richness that are the hallmark of this monumental series of recordings.
Just as there are multiple Links, there are multiple Zeldas throughout the series. Generally close in age to her respective Link, Zelda is most often portrayed as a child, but has been portrayed as a teenager or young adult on five occasions: in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
Princess is also featured in other media, including comics based on the games, animated shows, and the Super Smash Bros. series. In some of her appearances, she is depicted as a brave, proud, and self-reliant fighter who is proficient in archery and horseback riding, such as in the The Legend of Zelda comics by Valiant Comics and The Legend of Zelda TV series. As with the games, she is the protector of the Triforce of Wisdom.
In November 2004 in Japan and Europe, and January 2005 in America, Nintendo released The Minish Cap for the Game Boy Advance. In The Minish Cap Link can shrink in size using a mystical, sentient hat named Ezlo. While shrunk, he can see previously explored parts of a dungeon from a different perspective, and enter areas through otherwise-impassable openings.
Three Zelda-themed LCD games were created between 1989 and 1992. The Zelda version of Nintendo's Game & Watch series was released first in August 1989 as a dual-screen handheld electronic game similar in appearance to today's Nintendo DS. It was re-released in 1998 as a Toymax, Inc. Mini Classic and was later included as an unlockable extra in Game & Watch Gallery 4, a 2002 compilation for the Game Boy Advance. While the Game & Watch Zelda was developed in-house by Nintendo, the subsequent two LCD games were developed by third parties under license by Nintendo. In October 1989, The Legend of Zelda was developed by Nelsonic as part of its Game Watch line. This game was an actual digital watch with primitive gameplay based on the original Legend of Zelda. In 1992, Epoch Co. developed Zelda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Triforce for its Barcode Battler II console. The game employed card-scanning technology similar to the later-released Nintendo e-Reader.

Since the release of its first title in 1987, the FINAL FANTASY series has become a global phenomenon due to its cutting edge graphics technology, unique and distinctive world settings, and rich storylines. It has since sold over 142,000,000 copies (package/downloads). With 87 titles, the series was awarded the "most prolific role-playing game series" by the Guinness World Records in 2017.


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Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.
In Hyrule Warriors and Hyrule Warriors Legends, Impa is Zelda's faithful servant/protector, general, and advisor. General Impa possesses a samurai-like devotion to Zelda, similar to her Ocarina of Time and Skyward Sword incarnations. When Zelda goes missing, Impa is determined to find Zelda and enlists the help of the inexperienced Hero Link to find her. Ironically, Impa is suspicious and distrustful of the mysterious Sheik, mostly due to Sheik claim that she is a Sheikah survivor and member of Impa's tribe. Impa fails to realize Sheik's true identity, until it is revealed following Fake Zelda's defeat. However she knows Zelda character well enough to realize the Princess Zelda causing trouble in the Era of the Hero of Time was nothing more than a fake. She is shown to be visibly relieved when she learns that Princess Zelda had been fighting alongside her and the Hyrulean Forces while disguised as Sheik, despite her deception. After reuniting with the Princess, Impa returns to her role as Zelda's advisor and defender. Though she respects Zelda's judgment, Impa is shown to voice her opinion about the potential consequences, such as when she warned Zelda of the dangers of having Link remove the Master Sword from its pedestal in the Temple of the Sacred Sword in order to defeat Cia. Impa's fears are later realized when the final seal on Ganondorf's soul breaks, though continues to serve Zelda even after Ganondorf obtains the complete Triforce.
Final Fantasy installments are generally stand-alone stories each with different settings, plots and main characters, however, as a corpus they feature identical elements that define the franchise. Recurring elements include plot thematics, character names, and game mechanics. Plots center on a group of heroes battling a great evil while exploring the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, pop culture, and mythologies of cultures worldwide.

Outside of turn-based systems, the series has occasionally featured purely action-based combat systems, in which the skills the characters use are still similar to traditional skillsets of attacks, magic spells, special abilities and items, but the rate the characters use these abilities depends on player skill with less reliance on menus. The first in the main series with an action role-playing game focus is Final Fantasy XV, though many spin-offs, such as Crisis Core -Final Fantasy VII- and Final Fantasy Type-0, have used these systems before.

In 2011, to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the series, an art book was published exclusively in Japan under the name Hyrule Historia by Shogakukan. It contains concept art from the series's conception to the release of Skyward Sword in 2011 and multiple essays about the production of the games, as well as an overarching timeline of the series. It also includes a prequel manga to Skyward Sword by Zelda manga duo Akira Himekawa. The book received an international release by publisher Dark Horse Comics on January 29, 2013;[208] it took the number one spot on Amazon's sales chart, taking the spot away from E. L. James's 50 Shades of Grey trilogy.[209] Dark Horse released The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts, a follow-up art book to Hyrule Historia containing additional artwork and interviews,[210][211] in North America on February 21, 2017, and in Europe on February 23, 2017.[212]


The Dreamwave series lasted only four issues and also ended abruptly, with plot-threads from the first three issues being dropped completely in the final issue and the inclusion of a short story promising a Mega Man X follow-up that never materialized. This was one of several Dreamwave Capcom comics that were cut short or simply never made it to issue #1, including Maximo, Darkstalkers and Rival Schools.
Back in the present time, Mega Man and Rush were finally closing in on Wily’s fortress, defeating the first four set of Robot Masters. After penetrating into Wily's lair, Mega Man finds another four Robot Masters awaiting him via teleporters. Mega Man manages to defeat all eight of his adversaries and engages his modified future self Quint in combat. After defeating him, Mega Man obtains his weapon, a pogostick-like device called the Sakugarne. With it, he makes his way to the new Wily Station in space and defeats him yet again.
For the first time (not counting the non-canonical Phillips CD-i games), it is possible to play as Zelda herself as Link aids the princess to escape the castle. Afterward, Link, Zelda, and Alfonzo attempt to escape via train, but the train crashes due to the tracks disappearing beneath them. Chancellor Cole then appears to attack Zelda and take her body, which he hopes to use to revive the Demon King Malladus; however, Zelda's spirit escapes and returns to Hyrule Castle. There, she meets with Link, now the only one who can see her, to continue their way to the Tower of Spirits, where Zelda learns she can inhabit Phantoms to aid Link. After this, she and Link begin their journey to restore the Spirit Tracks leading to the Tower of Spirits to fortify the Malladus's prison and thus prevent the resurrection of the Demon King.[127]
The Adult Timeline is the timeline that follows the events after Link is being sent back to his original time, following the Hero of Time's defeat of Ganondorf in the final battle. Ganondorf is sealed within the Sacred Realm by the Seven Sages but, with Link sent back in time, the world is left without a Hero. This turn of events created the timeline containing The Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks.

Many of her abilities as both a Sage and the wielder of the Triforce of Wisdom are widely illustrated in Ocarina of Time, one of them being that she has prophetic visions in her dreams.[33][34] She also helps Link in their escape from Ganon's Castle by using her powers to magically remove the barriers blocking the exits. During the final battle between Link and Ganon, Princess Zelda uses her powers to restrain the King of Evil as Link delivers the final blow.[35] Being the seventh Sage, she is the ruler of the rest of the six Sages, and it is with her guidance that the Sages seal Ganon in the void of the Evil Realm.[3][36] Finally, with her powers as a Sage, she is capable of returning Link to his original time by simply using the Ocarina of Time.[37]
Get ready for a review of a lifetime because I'm about to spit straight fire about this game. You ever want to feel like you're in a high-speed chase going 200 miles an hour while running away from turtles? That's what this game feels like. It incorporates all the genius of all the past MarioKart games into this one mega deluxe game, all while sprinkling in new fun and exciting courses. Seriously dudes, I never cussed out a Mii named Despacito as much as I did while playing online. Don't even get me started on battle mode either that mode don't play. Almost decked my sister in the face on accident because of the tsunami waves of green shells I was being hit with. Overall fantastic masterpiece and just a Pro-Tip never use tilt controls unless you like to have an internal meltdown.
The Classic series has not reached a definite conclusion, Originally developed for the NES, the original Mega Man series experienced graphical improvements in fourth and fifth generation installments. The series had no games developed for sixth generation consoles but returned in the seventh generation purposely sporting graphics, sound and gameplay similar to the original NES games to inspire a nostalgic look and feel, distributed as downloadable content instead of retail games like the previous installments.
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
For the faint of heart, Capcom provides “casual” and “newcomer” settings that make things easier by granting extra or infinite lives, respectively. Dr. Light also offers assistance through an in-game shop where players can buy chips for Mega Man, boosting his arm cannon; extra parts that make it easier to walk on slippery surfaces or reduce knockback; and a cooling system that recharges his Double Gear functions more quickly. Capcom doesn’t make these power-ups feel like you’re cheating the system somehow; they’re presented as bonuses that can help frustrated players overcome Mega Man 11’s robust challenge a bit faster.
Many course themes recur throughout the series, including circuit, dirt, off-road, beach, desert, snow, and haunted tracks. Most courses are based on an existing Mario location (such as Bowser's Castle), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, such as Rainbow Road. Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas. Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups," or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. Course outlines are marked out by impassable barriers and feature a variety of bends, ranging from sharp hairpins to wide curves which players can drift around. Numerous obstacles appear on the tracks, ranging from generic obstacles to those themed after the Mario games. For example, the Bowser's Castle tracks feature Thwomps and sometimes Fire Bars or Lava Bubbles; beach courses may feature crabs and/or Cheep Cheeps; and the Mario Circuit tracks, depending on the game, may incorporate anything from pipe barriers to franchise-staple enemies like Piranha Plants and Chain Chomps. Another common type of obstacle is off-road sections which slow down the karts, such as shallow water or mud bogs.
The Champions' Ballad: A mysterious voice beckons Link to challenge the Divine Beast Tamer's Trials. He must now prove himself by defeating enemies using the One-Hit Obliterator, conquering new Shrines, challenging a full dungeon, and overcoming many trials along the way. Once all challenges and trials have been bested, Link will obtain a new power known as the Master Cycle Zero! Additionally, the bard Kass is traveling Hyrule to complete the unfinished song his teacher left behind. As Link and Kass chase their respective goals, Kass will share new original songs he wrote capturing lost memories of the four Champions and Zelda, previously unknown to Link. But that unfinished song... What could it be? *To play The Champions' Ballad, you must first complete the Main Quest to free the four Divine Beasts.

When it came to Mega Man 9, the one most people considered the hardest, I didn't really think it was that bad, the difficultly never felt punishing and it was usually fair in how many power-ups you were given and how the levels got steadily harder as you went along. Then came 10 which I thought was just WAY too hard and not in a good way. Where 9 felt balanced, 10 felt cheap and I found myself dying over and over for the stupidest reasons before finally just giving up on the game.
Square had been developing simple RPGs, pseudo-3D games and racing games, although they failed to compete with the market, and did not perform well commercially. Series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi and his team grew pessimistic at the failures as the company faced bankruptcy, so he began to develop the RPG Final Fantasy as a personal final project to leave a legacy; if the game had sold poorly, he would have quit the industry to return to university.[3]
In the Hyrule Warriors series, Princess Zelda acts as the Supreme Leader of the Hyrulean Forces and the Hyrulean Soldiers bravely serve her in much the same way as in Twilight Princess and Ocarina of Time. Despite her role as a military commander, she retains the compassion for the soldiers that serve under her but chooses to fight alongside them rather than protected by them. In turn her soldiers are very loyal to her and she can raise their moral with words alone, though this can be a double-edged sword as they become quite demoralized when she goes missing and were it not for the leadership of Link and Impa, the entire Hyrulean Forces may have been defeated by the Dark Forces. Though she later returned to fight alongside them under her guise as Sheik, they did not recognize her (though to be fair neither did Impa) and continued to search for the missing Princess. However they were relived when her identity was revealed and did not hold her deception against her. They also did not abandon her or Hyrule when Ganondorf managed to steal the Triforce of Courage and Triforce of Wisdom and later joined her in invading Gerudo Desert in order to defeat Ganondorf's generals, Zant and Ghirahim. After managing to defeat the villains, Zelda would lead her army to reclaim Hyrule Castle and defeat Ganondorf's Forces. The surviving soldiers would also fight alongside Zelda and her allies in the final battle against Ganon.
The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[215] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[216] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[217] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the series,[218] and BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[219] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[220]
VS Race – Multiple human players race against each other on any course with customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. The mode also includes single-player VS races and CPU controlled players to compete in VS races as well since Mario Kart DS (except for Mario Kart 7). Super Circuit, however, features a Quick Run mode, which shares similarities with VS mode.
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