Each setting often features some form of magic (sometimes spelled magick), though it often differs between the different lores. In many settings, magic is the power of the world's Crystals. In Final Fantasy VI magic has become a rarity, with many resorting to magitek (magic technology). In Final Fantasy VII, magic is a product of the Lifestream and can be used via Materia, though scientists have stated that "magic" is an unfitting term for a force of nature. In Final Fantasy XII, magick is provided by the mysterious substance known as Mist that seeps from the inside of the planet.

The Mega Man series has always been known for its difficulty, but as someone who has mixed feelings on difficult games, one of the things I always loved about the series is most of the games (except a few) were fair when it came to being difficult. This meant either more checkpoints as the series evolved, or short levels like the older titles. This gave the player the opportunity to learn the levels without punishing them and the bosses waiting at the end were usually pretty quick and easy to beat provided you had the right weapon to exploit their weakness.


Despite having little interaction with Link in Twilight Princess, Zelda worked flawlessly with him in their horseback battle against Ganondorf, managing to overwhelm the Demon King with their excellent teamwork. When Zelda asked Link for his assistance in defeating Ganondorf, Link offered his hand as a response. It is also thinkable that Link later went to meet her once the events of the story was over, as somewhat hinted in the end credits.
Although originally the names "Battle Kid" (バトルキッド), "Mighty Kid" (マイティーキッド), "Knuckle Kid" (ナックルキッド), "Rainbow Warrior Miracle Kid" (レインボー戦士 ミラクルキッド) and "The Battle Rainbow Rockman" (ザ・バトルレインボー ロックマン),[4][5] were proposed, Capcom eventually settled on "Rockman" as Mega Man's Japanese moniker. The word "Rock" in Rockman is a reference to the music genre rock and roll, and is meant to work in tandem with his "sister" robot, Roll. Such music-themed naming conventions are present in a number of Keiji Inafune's other character designs, such as Blues. In addition, the original Mega Man titles intentionally incorporated a "Rock, Paper, Scissors" game play mechanic into defeating certain enemies. In parts of the English speaking world, some people call Mega Man "The Blue Bomber" because of his blue armor and high fighting capabilities.

Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73]

+The beautiful art style makes up for anything lacking in the graphics department. The Wii U and Switch are not on par with the PS4 and Xbox One, so don't expect that type of beauty, but the art style truly does make a big difference. Nintendo has always been king when it comes to gorgeous art and design. Exploration is one of the game's biggest draws. Conquering the 100+ shrines is amazing!
Nintendo GameCube Mario Kart: Double Dash!!, released in 2003 for the Nintendo GameCube, introduced a number of new gameplay features. The most prominent feature is co-op gameplay with two riders per kart, where one player drives and the other uses items. This is also the first game to allow everyone to move on regardless of which position they earned after each race. In addition to 9 of the 10 characters who return from previous installments (excluding Donkey Kong Jr.), 11 new playable characters are added: Diddy Kong, Bowser Jr., Birdo, Princess Daisy, Waluigi, Koopa Paratroopa, babies Mario and Luigi, Petey Piranha, King Boo, and the newly-created Toadette. Each pair of drivers is assigned their own unique special item (e.g. fireballs for Mario and Luigi, or giant bananas for Donkey and Diddy Kong). Individual characters also gain their own unique custom-designed karts. Another new addition is the "All-Cup Tour," which has the player race in every track at the same time; once this is cleared on the highest difficulty setting, the player can unlock a "Parade Kart," which can be used by any character of any weight.
Link rescues Zelda and takes her into the Sanctuary, where she remains under the protection of the Loyal Sage for part of the game. After Link retrieves the Master Sword from the Lost Woods, Zelda is kidnapped by Agahnim's henchmen and sent to the Dark World in his final ritual, breaking the seal. She is not seen again until she is rescued by Link from Turtle Rock. Saving her and the other six maidens opens the entrance to Ganon's Tower, the final dungeon of the game. Zelda is last seen together with her revived father in the end credits sequence. It is hinted in the Oracle games and A Link Between Worlds that this Zelda became intimate with Link later on.
Jump up ↑ "When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand... Together with the Hero of Time, the awakened ones will bind the evil and return the light of peace to the world..." — Sheik (Ocarina of Time)
@ryancraddock With Switch, compared to other systems the physical versus digital matter is a lot more significant since there's very limited space for games at high cost, digitally, one has to be choosy with digital acquisitions. Ultimately physical buyers are going to be able to buy a lot more games. And WoFF is a relatively large game in terms of SD usage.
No details about Mario Kart Tour have been made available other than its existence, but the Mario Kart franchise is one of Nintendo’s biggest. Yesterday the company announced that 14.86 million Switch consoles have been sold, along with about half as many copies of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe — a straight port of a game that managed to sell a further eight million copies even on the Wii U.

In Breath of the Wild, Impa is one of Princess Zelda's closest allies along with her elder sister Purah, and Robbie. Purah herself states this to Link, telling him to talk to Impa about the pictures which Zelda had taken 100 years ago. Zelda was the one who also told Impa to give Link her message to "Free the Divine Beasts", showing that she trusted Impa immensely.


Custom 2 Plant Barrier 3% (circling), 4.2% (thrown) Mega Man summons flower petal-shaped units that orbit around him. The petals are more durable than the Leaf Shield, as they do not disappear when hit and deal slightly more damage when thrown, but they move slightly slower and have less range when thrown. The move is based on Plant Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
Many course themes recur throughout the series. Most are based on an existing area in the Mario franchise (Bowser's Castle being among the most prominent), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, but still belong in the Mushroom Kingdom, such as Rainbow Road.[3] Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas.[3] Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups", or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original Super NES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" (courses belonging to its own game) and 16 "retro" tracks (courses from previous Mario Kart games), spread across four cups each with four races. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, including Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.[5]
Dr. Wily once again sets his sights on world domination. This time, he revives several of his Robot Masters based on those of Light's designs, giving them another chance to do battle with Mega Man. Four Robot Masters rampage across the globe, so Dr. Light sends Mega Man out to stop them. Once they are taken down, Mega Man heads to Wily's fortress only to discover that four more Robot Masters await him there. To make matters worse, Dr. Wily has constructed a new powerful robot, a Mega Man Killer known as Enker. Enker has the ability to absorb Mega Man's shots with his lance and return a powerful blast of energy at him with his Mirror Buster; however, Enker is defeated, and Mega Man chases Wily to the Wily Station, using Enker's own Mirror Buster to defeat him.
Nintendo is likely to have more mobile titles in the works. The company originally planned to have released five smartphone games by 2017, but only Super Mario Run, Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and the ill-fated Miitomo social app have made it out so far. Last year The Wall Street Journal reported that Nintendo was working on a Legend of Zelda mobile title.
Sheik is Princess Zelda's Sheikah alter ego in Ocarina of Time. Wearing a blue, possibly armored suit with the red Sheikah eye in the center, and with voice muffled and face concealed, the character is essentially unrecognizable and appears relatively masculine. It is possible that Zelda utilizes her magical skills in altering her appearance. Sheik plays a lyre and teaches Link new songs to help him on his quest. When Link arrives at the Temple of Time near the end of the game, Sheik transforms back into Princess Zelda.
Unlike recent groundbreaking reboots of Mega Man’s NES contemporaries like The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros., Mega Man 11 only slightly modernizes series staples (shooting, jumping, boss fights) without adding much depth. Don’t expect many surprises: Just like we’ve done 10 times before, you beat the bosses, work your way through Wily’s castle, and then it’s over. I suppose that makes Mega Man 11 conform to a series where spinoffs added the most variety -- like Mega Man X’s exploration elements, which I really did miss in Mega Man 11’s linear, secret-free levels. But I highly enjoyed the one major gameplay innovation, the “Double Gear” system (I can only hear David Hayter’s Solid Snake say this), and it left me wanting more.
-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.
The Legend of Zelda[a] is an action-adventure video-game series created by Japanese game designers Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. It is primarily developed and published by Nintendo, although some portable installments and re-releases have been outsourced to Capcom, Vanpool, and Grezzo. The series' gameplay incorporates elements of action, adventure, and puzzle-solving games.
A reader brought to my attention this translation of an interview between one of the developers of the original Mega Man games (“A.K” in the credits) and one of the (probably more well-known) artists for some of the Rockman manga (he did Megamix, among many others). What I find amusing about this arrangement is ordinarily you would expect both of these men to be interviewed, rather than one of them interviewing the other.
Es gibt immer eine Prinzessin, die es zu retten gilt, und Link ist stets auf der Suche nach dem legendären Master-Schwert. Auch das Triforce spielt eine Rolle: Hierbei handelt es sich um ein mächtiges Artefakt und in den falschen Händen um eine gefährliche Waffe. Und wo ein mächtiges Artefakt ist, können Ganondorf und ähnliche Bösewichte nicht weit sein. Logisch also, dass all diese Markenzeichen der Reihe auch im Zelda Merchandise auftauchen. Tauch in die Phantasiewelt ein und begebe dich auf die Spuren von Link.
One of the features of the series is the use of various power-up items obtained by driving into item boxes laid out on the course. These power-ups include mushrooms to give players a speed boost, Koopa Shells to be thrown at opponents, banana peels, and fake item boxes that can be laid on the course as hazards. The type of weapon received from an item box is influenced by the player's current position in the race.[3] For example, players lagging far behind may receive more powerful items while the leader may only receive small defensive items. Called rubber banding, this gameplay mechanism allows other players or computers a realistic chance to catch up to the leading player.

According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21]
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