In 2001, under license from Nintendo, Capcom cancelled the release of The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage for Game Boy Color. Working with a Capcom team, Yoshiki Okamoto was originally tasked with designing a series of three Zelda games for the Game Boy Color.[104] Referred to as the "Triforce Series",[105] the games were known as The Legend of Zelda: The Mysterious Acorn: Chapter of Power, Chapter of Wisdom, and Chapter of Courage in Japan[106] and The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Power, Mystical Seed of Wisdom, and Mystical Seed of Courage in the US.[107] The games were to interact using a password system,[105] but the limitations of this system and the difficulty of coordinating three games proved too complicated, so the team scaled back to two games at Miyamoto's suggestion.[108][109] The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons was adapted from Mystical Seed of Power, The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages was adapted from Mystical Seed of Wisdom, and Mystical Seed of Courage was cancelled.[105]
With only Link able to see her, Zelda helps him obtain a sword before the two make their way Tower of Spirits. There, Anjean tells the duo that Zelda's body contains a sacred power and that Cole took it in order to serve as a vessel for the Demon King, Malladus. Learning that she can inhabit Phantoms to aid Link, Zelda proceeds to help him restore the tracks and the Tower of Spirits to its former glory.
When it came to Mega Man 9, the one most people considered the hardest, I didn't really think it was that bad, the difficultly never felt punishing and it was usually fair in how many power-ups you were given and how the levels got steadily harder as you went along. Then came 10 which I thought was just WAY too hard and not in a good way. Where 9 felt balanced, 10 felt cheap and I found myself dying over and over for the stupidest reasons before finally just giving up on the game.
Before Dr. Light ever constructed what would eventually become Mega Man, he first designed the robot known as "Proto Man" ("Blues" in Japan) which similar to his name was designed as a prototype of his future creations. Dr. Light's achievement greatly exceeded his expectations, however, he found a critical problem on Proto Man's power reactor. He made plans to modify and repair him, but the robot ran away, fearing that he would lose his identity and become like a different person.
All in all, I really like this game, but its not perfect. For some odd reason the first level seems to be one of the hardest in the game and the lack of checkpoints on normal considering the length of the levels feels like an oversight (if you want less checkpoints, that should be what Hard difficulty is for). I'd say if Casual was actually the Normal setting, a lot of my issues would be invalid, however perhaps they're invalid anyway since you can choose how hard you want to make this game. If I'm just ignoring the difficulty settings though and focusing on what's there, this is definitely one of the best Mega Man games, possibly just below 2, 3, and 9. Yes some parts of the levels are cheap, but the game gives you so many options to lessen the frustration, I can't fault it too much.
Like the Super Mario series, the Mario Kart series has achieved successful sales with over 100 million copies sold in total.[20] Super Mario Kart has sold 8.76 million copies and is the fourth best-selling game on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System console.[14] Mario Kart 64 is the second-bestselling game for the Nintendo 64 (behind Super Mario 64), selling a total of 9.87 million copies.[14]Mario Kart: Double Dash has sold 6.96 million copies.[14] It is the second best-selling game on the GameCube (next to Super Smash Bros. Melee). Mario Kart Wii has achieved highly successful numbers, selling a total of 37.10 million copies.[16] It is the best-selling installment in the series and is the second best-selling game for the Wii (next to Wii Sports).[16] Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U, has shipped 1.2 million copies in North America and Europe combined on its first few days since launch, which was the console's fastest-selling game until the record was beaten by Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.[21][22] It sold a total of 8.42 million copies and is the Wii U's best-selling game.[18] In contrast, the enhanced port for the Nintendo Switch system, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, has sold 459,000 units in the United States in one day of its launch, making it the fastest-selling game in the series to date.[23] Deluxe sold a total of 10.35 million copies worldwide, outperforming the original Wii U version, and is the second-bestselling Nintendo Switch game of all time (behind Super Mario Odyssey).[19] Both versions sold a combined total of 18.77 million copies
Once upon a time, eight bosses and a handful of increasingly vicious Dr. Wily stages were all that a player might have needed to wile away day after day, scribbling down passwords and carefully memorizing the position of each precious E Tank. (Filed mentally right next to their grid map of Hyrule, or the locations of all the hidden 1-UP mushrooms in Super Mario Bros. 1.) But with modern conveniences like between-level saving and the ability to toss plentiful in-game currency at your supply of extra lives and mid-level recharges, those replayable, compulsive elements have been steadily whittled down. And even with its not-infrequent highs, Mega Man 11 doesn’t have anything more substantial to offer in their place, instead relying on a basic skeleton that can’t help but creak as its 30th anniversary arrives. Mega Man 9 (and, to a lesser extent, 10) overcame these pitfalls with a combination of laser-guided nostalgia and rock-solid platforming precision, but 10 years (and any number of more ambitious retro platformers—cough, Shovel Knight, cough) later, and even 11’s biggest swings for the unorthodox leave it feeling like little more than a trifle. In a medium that evolves by the day, 11 is content just to be a pretty good Mega Man game—for better and for worse.

Mega Man Legacy Collections keeps the look and feel of the classic games while updating them to fit modern HD television sets and the Switch’s display. The option to change viewing modes allows you to enjoy the game in its original 4:3 aspect ratio, full screen or widescreen. However, the widescreen option stretches the game out too much and is not very appealing, especially when playing on the Switch’s handheld mode. I definitely recommend keeping the original screen ratio to give it that arcade feel. The filter options for Legacy Collections are also awesome, especially if you’re trying to maximize that arcade feel. Set the game filter to “monitor” and it’ll feel like you’re playing on an arcade box.


Several years passed, with Zelda remaining the same because of the curse. Link, who had become sixteen, learned of this tragedy and sets off on a journey to reclaim the lost section of the Triforce to lift the curse. Once Link gains the full Triforce, he goes back to the palace where Zelda resides in and disperses the curse. Now free from the curse, Zelda thanks Link and calls him a "real hero" for saving Hyrule. The curtains then fall as Link and Zelda appear to embrace each other.
The next Legend of Zelda for the DS, The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks, was released December 7, 2009, in North America and December 11, 2009, in the UK. In this game, the 'spirit tracks', railroads which chain an ancient evil, are disappearing from Hyrule. Zelda and Link go to the 'Spirit Tower' (the ethereal point of convergence for the tracks) to find out why. But villains steal Zelda's body for the resurrection of the Demon King. Rendered disembodied, Zelda is left a spirit, and only Link (and a certain few sages) can see her. Together they go on a quest to restore the spirit tracks, defeat the Demon King, and return Zelda to her body. Using a modified engine of that used in Phantom Hourglass, the notably new feature in this game is that the Phantom Guardians seen in Phantom Hourglass are, through a series of events, periodically controllable. It was the first time in the series that both Link & Zelda work together on the quest.

@ryancraddock With Switch, compared to other systems the physical versus digital matter is a lot more significant since there's very limited space for games at high cost, digitally, one has to be choosy with digital acquisitions. Ultimately physical buyers are going to be able to buy a lot more games. And WoFF is a relatively large game in terms of SD usage.
Ive played this game for about 40 hours so far and all I can say is wow. It returns to the original Zelda format of no set structure to how you play. I was about 20 hours in before I even went to the first story line dungeon. There is just so much to explore and get side tracked by. Climb a mountain on the way to a far off village and discover 2 or 3 things you want to go before you get to you ultimate goal. Every where you go there is something that peaks your interest or it just pure beauty. This may become my favorite zelda game ever and yes ive played them all

Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]

A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.
Zelda is portrayed as a young girl or beautiful young woman, usually with blonde hair. In Twilight Princess, however (and therefore in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, as well as Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U, in which her appearance is based on that of Twilight Princess), she is depicted as a brunette. She also has light brown hair in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (though she is depicted as being blonde in artwork), and auburn hair in The Adventure of Link.
According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21]
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