Mega Man's role in the original story is to battle the mad scientist Dr. Wily and his ever-growing army of robots, and stop them from taking over Earth by using their own special abilities against them. Utilizing his special Mega Buster arm cannon, and his ability to copy a defeated robot's Special Weapon, Mega Man must travel the world and traverse harsh environments in order to bring Wily's menace to an end. With the help of his creator Dr. Light and his assorted robotic companions, Mega Man's eventual goal is to one day achieve "everlasting peace".
Certain incarnations, like the Zelda of Skyloft and Tetra, are shown to have a slightly playful personality and more casual attitude. However, this is likely due to the fact that neither was raised to be royalty from birth unlike most incarnations of Princess Zelda. The Zelda of Skyloft was indeed born a commoner and Tetra is the child of a pirate. Additionally, at least two incarnations are known to have tomboyish qualities, such as Tetra and the Zelda from Ocarina of Time.
However, Wily's frequent false repentances have become a constant frustration to Mega Man who appears to developing less patience with him, something that came to a head in the course of Mega Man 7 where he contemplated killing him, though ultimately decided against it. He further pointed out Wily's previous false repentances at the end of Mega Man 9, showing his diminishing patience, however he nonetheless assists him when he becomes ill in Mega Man 10.
The tracks in Mario Kart Wii are based thematically on locations seen in the Mario series,[original research?] such as Bowser's Castle. Each of the eight cups features four different tracks for a total of 32 unique tracks, 16 of which are new to the series, while the other 16 are several tracks ported from previous installments.[6] The cups (groups of tracks) are the Mushroom, Flower, Star, Special, Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups. The Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups each contain retro tracks, updated versions of tracks originally found in the five previous Mario Kart installments. There are ten arena courses available for Battle mode, which include five original courses and five retro courses.[7]
The Zelda from Hyrule Warriors is also shown to be a talented conductor who can wield various Batons, including the legendary Wind Waker. Her ability to wield the Wind Waker is considerably better than Link's, as she can manipulate the wind to lift her off the ground as a form of levitation. In addition to her Batons and Rapiers, Zelda can also wield Dominion Rods that allow her to command and control Hammer Guardians and Owl Statues.

Legacy Collection 1 and 2 also offer up timed Challenges, which are remixed Mega Man levels that provide a more substantial challenge. Players traverse through various parts of different levels, all while trying to beat a predetermined score. Mega Man levels are difficult, often rewarding a slow, methodical pace, but the Challenges are the complete opposite. Believe me, you’ll need all of your skills to complete them.


During her time with Link, Zelda wonders why he never speaks.[145] Link's initial silence causes Zelda to believe that Link despised her due to her inability to use sealing power despite being a daughter of Hyrule's royal family.[146] Later on, Zelda discovers an Ancient Shrine and fails to open it.[147] Link arrives at the scene, which angers Zelda and causes her to lash out.[148] She tells Link to return to the castle[149] and testily demands he stop following her, regardless of the King's orders.[150] Later on, Zelda travels to the Gerudo Desert and is ambushed by the Yiga Clan. Link rescues her right before a Yiga assassin is about to kill her, striking him down and causing the other two Yiga to flee. This causes Zelda to change her attitude towards Link, valuing his devotion to protect her.[151] Over the course of their journey, both start to open up to each other and realize how similar they are in their hardships of fulfilling their respective tasks.[152] Her growing care and relationship towards Link plays a crucial role in awakening her legendary abilities.[153]
Nintendo 64 Mario Kart 64, launched in 1996/1997 for the Nintendo 64, was a vast improvement from the SNES original. It moved the series to polygon-based true 3D computer graphics for track design, allowing for track features that were not possible with Mode 7, such as bridges, walls, pits, and elevation changes; however, the characters and items remain 2D pre-rendered sprites. Other new additions include digital voice acting, 4-player support, the modern character weight classification system, Mirror mode, ghost data for Time Trial courses, and a new item called the Spiny Shell which targets and attacks the player in the lead. The game features 16 normal race courses, as well as four battle courses. Though there are still eight playable characters, two new characters are introduced: Wario (replacing Koopa Troopa) and Donkey Kong (replacing Donkey Kong Jr.), both of whom have reappeared throughout the series.
Mega Man would later rank 16th on the third tier list, a very slight drop in favor of Marth claiming 10th place. Currently, however, due to his huge lack of consistent results, Mega Man is currently ranked 27th on the fourth and current tier list, suffering the largest drop between the third and fourth tier lists. Some smashers have said said that Mega Man should be higher due to his amazing projectile game and his matchup spread, while others like ZeRo think that Mega Man is overrated and that his placing is somewhat accurate.

Mario Kart 64 is the first 3D mario game, Nintendo tried before this to make a Mario Kart for SNES. Because it is 3D it gets a lot better and easier to control. With new "Time Trials" and characters it will be very exciting when you win the Grand Prix like 100 times and  keep doing it again for the entertainment. Because of the fact that there is not many bugs I think that it makes it even greater. If you are a Mario Kart fan or just a Mario fan then I think that you should get it. I rated it ........5/5
Custom 1 Tornado Hold 2% (center), 1% (sides) Drops a spinning fan onto the ground that creates a tornado and pushes anyone caught in it upwards, dealing multiple hits. It can be also used to combo into the Flame Sword, Slash Claw or Air Shooter. If used in mid-air, it causes the fan to fall as it pushes Mega Man up, giving it better offensive potential but slightly less vertical distance than the Rush Coil. It is based on Tengu Man's weapon from Mega Man 8.
Several months after the events of Mega Man IV, Rock and Roll are strolling through a grassy field, when suddenly, they are confronted by a mysterious new robot who calls himself Terra. Mega Man attempts to fight Terra, only to find that his Mega Buster arm cannon has no effect on this new powerful enemy. Mega Man is knocked unconscious, and two groups of powerful robots calling themselves the "Stardroids" attack Earth, causing destruction around the globe. Waking up in Dr. Light's laboratory, Mega Man is presented with the new and powerful Mega Arm to help him fight the Stardroids in his newest mission to save the planet. Upon defeating 4 of the 8 Stardroids, Mega Man confronts Terra, only to discover it was a trap that Terra set up, forcing Mega Man to fight Dark Moon.
The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original SNES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" original courses and 16 "retro" tracks drawn from previous titles, spread across four cups each. The four "nitro" cups ― the Mushroom Cup, Flower Cup, Star Cup, and Special Cup ― have been recurring cups throughout the entire series, while the "retro" cups from the more recent installments are the Shell Cup, Banana Cup, Leaf Cup, and Lightning Cup. As the player progresses through the cups, each is ostensibly more difficult than the one before it. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, namely Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.
In Sonic Lost World, a DLC stage based on The Legend of Zelda series was released in March 2014, named "The Legend of Zelda Zone". While built around the core gameplay mechanics of Sonic Lost World, "The Legend of Zelda Zone" incorporates some elements from the Zelda series, including a heart-based vitality meter, rupee collection, and a miniature dungeon to explore.[116]
No details about Mario Kart Tour have been made available other than its existence, but the Mario Kart franchise is one of Nintendo’s biggest. Yesterday the company announced that 14.86 million Switch consoles have been sold, along with about half as many copies of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe — a straight port of a game that managed to sell a further eight million copies even on the Wii U.
Several years passed, with Zelda remaining the same because of the curse. Link, who had become sixteen, learned of this tragedy and sets off on a journey to reclaim the lost section of the Triforce to lift the curse. Once Link gains the full Triforce, he goes back to the palace where Zelda resides in and disperses the curse. Now free from the curse, Zelda thanks Link and calls him a "real hero" for saving Hyrule. The curtains then fall as Link and Zelda appear to embrace each other.
The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][101] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[102] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][101] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[103][104][105] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][103] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[106] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][103] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[107] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[108][109][110]
The Dreamwave series lasted only four issues and also ended abruptly, with plot-threads from the first three issues being dropped completely in the final issue and the inclusion of a short story promising a Mega Man X follow-up that never materialized. This was one of several Dreamwave Capcom comics that were cut short or simply never made it to issue #1, including Maximo, Darkstalkers and Rival Schools.
The Princess responded by refusing to reveal it, even when her brother and the Magician threatened her. In his anger, the Magician put a powerful curse on the Princess, despite the objections of the new King. The exertions caused the Magician himself to drop dead after casting the spell, so he could not be induced to undo it. Devastated, the grieving brother had his sister locked in a tower of the North Castle, and decreed that every female born into the royal family would thereafter be named Zelda, in memory of the tragedy.
The next three titles would be released on PlayStation 2. Due to the more advanced technology, the games no longer relied on pre-rendered backgrounds, instead using the game engine to render the backgrounds immediately. Final Fantasy X improved in the facial expressions displayed by the characters, using skeletal animation technology and motion capture, to allow the characters to make more realistic lip movements to match the new voice acting, a first in the series which previously was restricted to text-based story telling. The following release, Final Fantasy XI, was the first in the series to use online multiplayer features, which was another expensive development project for the company.[23] Final Fantasy XII would later use only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X in exchange for improved lighting and texture rendering.[24]
Every time a new Zelda game comes around, I can’t wait to explore its dungeons. There’s just something about that feeling of progression– collecting keys, opening chests, solving puzzles, tackling larger-than-life bosses– that speaks to me. It’s certainly no coincidence that my favorite Zelda entries are those with the strongest dungeons. Indeed, for many fans, these sections have been an integral part of the series. That said, not every dungeon receives a ton of love. From Ocarina of Time’s Water…
Near the beginning of The Wind Waker, Link saves a young pirate girl named Tetra after the Helmaroc King drops her into the nearby forest on Outset Island. After the bird kidnaps Link's sister Aryll, Tetra and her pirates bring Link to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue her. During the race for Nayru's Pearl, Link runs into Tetra at Windfall Island, where he steals the bombs from her pirate ship. Tetra allows Link until morning before she comes after him and Jabun. Link meets Tetra one last time, at the Forsaken Fortress, where she saves his sister and warns him of the Helmaroc King. She then attempts to save Link during his confrontation with Ganondorf. Her blows are easily deflected and Ganondorf strikes back, grabbing Tetra by the neck. Before he can do anything to her, his Triforce resonates, showing him that he has finally found Princess Zelda, with Tetra confused by Ganondorf's words.
I feel like there is less cheap death compared to previous installments, but it makes itself more of an endurance match to get to the boss. I really enjoy each stage having its own thought out mini boss also and the fact that you don't spawn right in front of the door when you die. You instead have to work your way back without losing too much health so you can make it through the fight while still making a couple errors.

Happy Monday, everybody! I know I keep forgetting to post a Caption Contest every week, but I could not, under any circumstance, miss this week of all weeks. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate releases this Friday, and I’m sure the entire Nintendo fanbase is looking for a way to alleviate the anticipation. So why not let the Zelda Dungeon Caption Contest distract you for a little while as you wait for Ultimate to hit store shelves?
The VS mode involves player(s) racing a track of their choice and also feature customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. VS mode has been changed several times throughout the series. In earlier games, VS mode is exclusive to multiplayer without any computer-controlled racers. Starting from Mario Kart DS, VS mode can be played either single player with CPU racers, or multiplayer with or without CPU racers. A notable exception is Mario Kart 7, where single-player VS races are removed and limited only to multiplayer, but the rules remain the same as in Mario Kart DS and later installments.
Wii Mario Kart Wii was released for the Wii in 2008. For the first time in the series, the player can race using motorcycles (labeled in-game as "bikes") and perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, slipstreaming, and wheelies. The game is primarily played using the plastic Wii Wheel accessory, which uses the controller's motion sensing to simulate operating a steering wheel. The game features 24 playable characters, the largest roster of the series at the time (Baby Daisy makes her debut in the Mario franchise, and other new additions to the Mario Kart series include Baby Peach, Funky Kong, Dry Bowser, and Rosalina; Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable). The concept of retro tracks is expanded to the Battle mode, with one retro battle course from each game in the series. When Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was in existence, Mario Kart Wii allowed the VS and Battle modes to be played by up to twelve participants, and also featured the "Mario Kart Channel," which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu and allowed players to check their regional or global Time Trial rankings, send and receive ghost data, and participate in worldwide tournaments on modified courses with special objectives.
Princess Zelda returns as a playable character in the fifth installment of Super Smash Bros. Her appearance is now based on her design from A Link Between Worlds, since Masahiro Sakurai and the developers felt her Breath of the Wild incarnation was more suited to research than combat. In the Japanese trailer, however, it lists the basis of her appearance as being Triforce of the Gods, or A Link to the Past. Her move set is largely the same as previous games with some adjustments. However, Zelda's Final Smash has changed from the Light Arrow to the Triforce of Wisdom, which will trap opponents inside the titular Triforce piece for huge damage.

Mario Kart Wii was the sixth game in the Mario Kart series, following Super Mario Kart, Mario Kart 64, Mario Kart: Super Circuit, Mario Kart: Double Dash, and Mario Kart DS.[11] Hideki Konno, who worked with the Software Development Department of Nintendo's Entertainment Analysis & Development (EAD) division and had previously worked on the first 2 Mario Kart games as well as Mario Kart DS, served as the game’s producer. Shigeru Miyamoto acted as “General Producer” and gave miscellaneous advice on various aspects of the game.[12]

The series often features other mythological references, such as Kefka Palazzo and Sephiroth's godforms based on divinity as their final encounters in Final Fantasy VI and Final Fantasy VII. The game worlds themselves are commonly based on real-world mythology, such as Final Fantasy X and its Shinto and Buddhism influences, and the influence of Jewish mysticism in Final Fantasy VII.


Mega Man (ロックマン, Rockman) is a newcomer in Super Smash Bros. 4. He was announced at Nintendo's E3 2013 Direct Conference presentation for the game, becoming the first-revealed of the six third-party characters in the game along with SEGA's Sonic and Bayonetta, Bandai Namco's Pac-Man, fellow Capcom character Ryu, and Square Enix's Cloud. He does not widely use hand-to-hand combat, instead relying on the large arsenal of ranged weaponry he has amassed by defeating boss characters in his own games. His sound effects are reused from the vast number of retro Mega Man games he has appeared in.
The Legend of Zelda, the first game of the series, was first released in Japan on February 21, 1986, on the Famicom Disk System.[56] A cartridge version, using battery-backed memory, was released in the United States on August 22, 1987, and Europe on November 27, 1987. The game features a "Second Quest," accessible either upon completing the game, or by registering one's name as "ZELDA" when starting a new quest. The Second Quest features different dungeons and item placement, and more difficult enemies.[57]
Custom 1 Tornado Hold 2% (center), 1% (sides) Drops a spinning fan onto the ground that creates a tornado and pushes anyone caught in it upwards, dealing multiple hits. It can be also used to combo into the Flame Sword, Slash Claw or Air Shooter. If used in mid-air, it causes the fan to fall as it pushes Mega Man up, giving it better offensive potential but slightly less vertical distance than the Rush Coil. It is based on Tengu Man's weapon from Mega Man 8.
Jump up ↑ "The prince immediately questioned the princess, but she wouldn't tell him anything. After the prince, the magician threatened to put the princess into an enternal sleep if she did not talk, but even still, she said nothing. In his anger, the magician tried to cast a magic spell on the princess. The surprised prince tried to stop him, but the magician fought off the prince and went on chanting the spell. Then, when the spell was finally cast, Princess Zelda fell on that spot and enter a sleep from which she might never awake. At the same time, the magician also fell down and breathe his last." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 7, 8)
Zelda is featured on four stickers. Two of these are titled "Young Zelda," while the other two are simply titled "Zelda." The first two depict artwork of Zelda as a child from Ocarina of Time and The Minish Cap, and provide a +20 bonus to electric attacks and a +16 bonus to battering resistance, respectively. The latter can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf. The two stickers titled "Zelda" depict artwork of Zelda from A Link to the Past and of her adult form from Ocarina of Time. The former grants a +27 bonus to magic attacks and, like all other stickers that grant bonuses to magic attacks, can only be used by Zelda and Peach. The latter grants a +18 bonus to flame resistance and can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf.

^ Jump up to: a b "Long interview with Eiji Aonuma". nindori.com. Nintendo DREAM. Feb 2007. Archived from the original on January 27, 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2010. 『時のオカリナ』から百数年後の世界です。 ... 『風のタクト』はパラレルなんですよ。『時のオカリナ』でリンクが7年後の世界に飛んで、ガノンを倒すと、子ども時代に戻るじゃないですか。『トワイライトプリンセス』は、平和になった子ども時代から百数年後の世界なんです。 / It is a world 100 and something years after Ocarina of Time. ... The Wind Waker is parallel. In Ocarina of Time, Link leaps to a world seven years later, defeats Ganon, and then returns to the child era, right? Twilight Princess is the world 100 and something years after peace is restored in the child era.
The celebrated Mega Man X series comes to Nintendo Switch! Play as Mega Man X -the powerful evolution of classic fighting robot Mega Man -as he battles a variety of deadly bosses known as Mavericks in eight exhilarating action-platformer games. Mega Man X Legacy Collection includes the legendary 16-bit titles and the series' exciting foray into 32-bits: Mega Man X, Mega Man X2, Mega Man X3, and Mega Man X4. The heroic robot grows stronger as he takes down Mavericks and steals their weapons, and also has the ability to dash and wall jump for thrilling, fast-paced combat. Mega Man X's mysterious friend, Zero, also joins the fray as a playable character later in this collection.
Games in The Legend of Zelda series frequently feature in-game musical instruments, particularly in musical puzzles, which are widespread.[2] Often, instruments trigger game events: for example, the recorder in The Legend of Zelda can reveal secret areas, as well as warp Link to the Dungeon entrances. This warping with music feature has also been used in A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening. In Ocarina of Time, playing instruments is a core part of the game, with the player needing to play the instrument through the use of the game controller to succeed.[3] Ocarina of Time is "[one of the] first contemporary non-dance title[s] to feature music-making as part of its gameplay",[4] using music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to utilise songs to progress in the game[5] – a game mechanic that is also present in Majora's Mask.[6]
The Legends series concluded with only two main games and a spin-off starring mainstay antagonist Tron Bonne before being discontinued. Unlike Battle Network and Zero, the final game in the series does not resolve the storyline. A continuation to the Legends series has become an oft-requested game among many Capcom and Mega Man fans. A third game was once under development for the Nintendo 3DS, but on July 17, 2011, Capcom cancelled the project saying it did not meet certain requirements. This decision was met with criticism from fans and gaming news outlets.[3][4]
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