↑ Jump up to: 29.0 29.1 "We must stop him from freeing himself from the seal that imprisons him. At any cost... That is why I intend to remain here in this time and place... To sustain the seal as best as I can. As long as I continue this vigil, we may be able to prevent the demon king from fully reviving himself in our own time." — Zelda (Skyward Sword)
As pointed out by others, Zelda has many attributes that attracts allies. While not always a stable relationship from the start, she has gained many good friends throughout various games. Most of her friends deeply respect her as the princess of Hyrule and do not doubt her judgment. Her kindness is enough to turn even some of her enemies into allies.
Several games within the series have become best-selling games. At the end of 2007, the seventh, eighth, and ninth best-selling RPGs were Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, and Final Fantasy X respectively.[142] Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 11 million copies worldwide,[143] earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy game.[144] Within two days of Final Fantasy VIII's North American release on September 9, 1999, it became the top-selling video game in the United States, a position it held for more than three weeks.[145] Final Fantasy X sold over 1.4 million Japanese units in pre-orders alone, which set a record for the fastest-selling console RPG.[142][146] The MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, reached over 200,000 active daily players in March 2006[147] and had reached over half a million subscribers by July 2007.[46] Final Fantasy XII sold more than 1.7 million copies in its first week in Japan.[148] By November 6, 2006—one week after its release—Final Fantasy XII had shipped approximately 1.5 million copies in North America.[149] Final Fantasy XIII became the fastest-selling game in the franchise,[150] and sold one million units on its first day of sale in Japan.[151] Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, in comparison to its predecessor, was a runaway success, originally suffering from servers being overcrowded,[152] and eventually gaining over one million unique subscribers within two months of its launch.[153]
Games in The Legend of Zelda series frequently feature in-game musical instruments, particularly in musical puzzles, which are widespread.[2] Often, instruments trigger game events: for example, the recorder in The Legend of Zelda can reveal secret areas, as well as warp Link to the Dungeon entrances. This warping with music feature has also been used in A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening. In Ocarina of Time, playing instruments is a core part of the game, with the player needing to play the instrument through the use of the game controller to succeed.[3] Ocarina of Time is "[one of the] first contemporary non-dance title[s] to feature music-making as part of its gameplay",[4] using music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to utilise songs to progress in the game[5] – a game mechanic that is also present in Majora's Mask.[6]
Distant Worlds IV boasts one of the strongest track lists of any of our recordings with brilliant new classics from the latest game release FINAL FANTASY XV: APOCALYPSIS NOCTIS and Somnus, new orchestral arrangements from FINAL FANTASY VII: Cosmo Canyon and JENOVA COMPLETE, FINAL FANTASY VIII: The Oath and FINAL FANTASY IX: Festival of the Hunt, and Nobuo Uematsu’s FINAL FANTASY XIV: Dragonsong featuring the inimitable voice of Susan Calloway.
Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule in this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on the Nintendo Switch console, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.
Character growth determines how player characters learn new abilities and boost their stats. Unlike battle systems, character growth systems are less consistent throughout the series, and players must internalize the systems to make the correct decisions. The only consistent character growth mechanic used in the series has been the level based system where characters raise their level through experience points earned in battle to improve stats and sometimes learn new abilities. Even this system has been excluded from some games, such as in Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII, where only ability points are accumulated from battles that can be expended for both better stats and new skills.
One key theme in the series is dualism, presented in many ways, such as through a contrast between two worlds, between two heroes/heroines, and between a protagonist and an antagonist. Most often this dualism represents a balance that is disturbed by outside forces, forcing the protagonists to restore it. Other times, the "balance" set is deemed unjust by the protagonists and they must instead end the cycle to free the world.
The VS mode involves player(s) racing a track of their choice and also feature customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. VS mode has been changed several times throughout the series. In earlier games, VS mode is exclusive to multiplayer without any computer-controlled racers. Starting from Mario Kart DS, VS mode can be played either single player with CPU racers, or multiplayer with or without CPU racers. A notable exception is Mario Kart 7, where single-player VS races are removed and limited only to multiplayer, but the rules remain the same as in Mario Kart DS and later installments.
The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][93] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[97] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[98] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[99]
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, a remaster of the original GameCube game, was released by Nintendo on September 20, 2013, digitally on the Nintendo eShop in North America with a retail release on September 26 in Japan, October 4 in North America and Europe, and October 5 in Australia. A month later, Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS, which takes place in the same setting as A Link to the Past.[92][93]
Various incarnations of Mega Man appear as playable fighters in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. The original was a playable fighter in Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes and Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes. He is assisted by his companion robots, Rush, Beat and Eddie. His sister robot, Roll, is also playable in both games, but is a secret character in the first game. Although he did not make a playable appearance in Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds, and its successor, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Zero from Mega Man X and Tron Bonne from Mega Man Legends appear as representatives for the series. Mega Man X appears as an alternate costume for Zero and Frank West and as a card in Heroes and Heralds mode. The original Mega Man appears in the arcade endings of Thor and Nova, and also appears on a poster in the Days of Future Past stage, and finally, as another card in Heroes and Heralds Mode. Mega Man X and Zero appears as playable characters in Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite, with Sigma appearing as both a DLC fighter and a major antagonist in the Story Mode, where he merges with the supervillain Ultron to become Ultron Sigma.[citation needed]

-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.
After a five-year hiatus, the series made the transition to 3D with Ocarina of Time for the Nintendo 64, which was released in November 1998. This game, initially known as Zelda 64, retains the core gameplay of the previous 2D games, and was very successful commercially and critically. It is considered by many critics and gamers to be the best video game of all time, and ranks highly on IGN and EGM's "greatest games of all time" lists, as well as scoring perfect scores in several video game publications.[62] In February 2006, it was ranked by Nintendo Power as the best game released for a Nintendo console.[63] The game was originally developed for the poorly selling, Japanese-only Nintendo 64DD, but was ported to cartridge format when the 64DD hardware was delayed.[64] A new gameplay mechanic, lock-on targeting (called "Z-targeting" as that is the controller button used), is used in the game, which focuses the camera on a nearby target and alters the player's actions relative to that target.[65] Such mechanics allow precise sword fighting in a 3D space. The game heavily uses context-sensitive button play, which enabled the player to control various actions with Link using only one button on the Nintendo 64's game pad. Each action was handled slightly differently but all used the 'A' button to perform. For instance, standing next to a block and pressing 'A' made Link grab it (enabling him to push/pull it), but moving forwards into a block and pressing 'A' allowed Link to climb the block. The 'B' button was used only as an attack button. The game featured the first appearance of Link's horse, Epona, allowing Link to travel quickly across land and fire arrows from horseback. Those who preordered the game received a gold-coloured cartridge in a limited edition box with a golden plastic card affixed, reading "Collector's Edition".[66] In some stores that had this "Collector's Edition" quickly sell out, a small and rare Zelda pin was given instead. It is the sword and shield emblem with "Zelda" written on it. Very few of them are known to remain.
Mega Man is enjoying his day until Roll falls ill with Roboenza. At first, he believes that Wily is behind the epidemic, but Wily claims that he had found the cure, only to have it stolen by eight out-of-control Robot Masters. After defeating them all, Mega Man learns that Dr. Wily actually was behind the Roboenza epidemic all along. He succumbs to Roboenza himself, but Roll gives him her saved medicine to give him the strength to defeat Wily.
Up until Breath of the Wild, the Legend of Zelda series avoided using voice acting in speaking roles, relying instead on written dialogue. Series producer Eiji Aonuma previously stated that as Link is entirely mute, having the other characters speak while Link remains silent "would be off-putting".[9] Instead of theme music for different locations, Breath of the Wild plays natural ambience around the player as main sounds, in addition to some minimalist piano music.[10]
Don’t be too afraid, however: While tough stretches in previous Mega Man games forced you to learn patterns and hone your skills, in Mega Man 11 you can stock up on powerups to take the edge off. For every challenge, there’s a consumable item to snatch you out of a pit, refill your energy, or protect you from spikes. You just have to grind a bit to collect bolts and purchase your way to success. Of course, grinding is not fun, so it’s only when I got really annoyed with replaying a lengthy level that I went shopping.

Recently a series of artbooks called the Official Complete Works has been published for individual Mega Man series, showcasing a large collection of artwork and background information. To date, books for the Zero, Classic and X (released together as R20), Star Force, and Battle Network series have been produced. Although these books have for many years been exclusive to Japan, UDON Entertainment Corporation has finished translating the Official Complete Works series for the North American market, called "R25".
However Urbosa's Diary reveals that Urbosa has known Zelda for most of her life as the Queen of Hyrule brought the newborn Zelda to Gerudo Town as she and Gerudo Chieftain Urbosa were close friends in addition to being sworn allies. When the Queen died suddenly when Zelda was six, Urbosa attended the state funeral as both Gerudo Chieftain and a friend. However she worried about Zelda to the point a year after the funeral she went to Hyrule Castle to find out how Zelda was coping and even accompanied Zelda to the Spring of Power in place of Zelda's mother who was originally supposed to oversee Zelda's training but her death occured before Zelda began her training. Urbosa watched as Zelda fervently prayed to Hylia in the cold water until Urbosa was forced to pull her out causing Zelda to break down from all the pressure she was under along with her holding in her grief. Urbosa consoled Zelda as she let out all the emotions and grief she had been suppressing. Urbosa was one of the few people who understood the pressure Zelda was under and also was aware of the fact Zelda had been putting on a brave face after her mother's death while in truth grieved her mother's death as much if not more so than Urbosa and her father. Urbosa and Zelda became friends with Urbosa acting as a surrogate mother or aunt figure to Zelda. In addition to Urbosa's hatred of Ganon due to his origins as Ganondorf, Urbosa became a Champion to support Zelda despite her own people and advisers being against it. Urbosa however did her best to assist Link in finding Zelda when she abused Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail and hoped the two would eventually get along showing while she cared for Zelda she did not share Zelda's biased opinion towards Link and likely recognized Zelda resented Link's talent given her struggles to awaken her power which Urbosa witnessed first hand. Like Link, Urbosa was fiercely protective of Zelda as she foiled an assassination attempt by the Yiga Clan and was prepared to kill them though relented when Zelda requested their lives be spared as the Yiga were simply misguided Sheikah angered over their peoples mistreatment in the past. However Urbosa had her soldiers gather intel on the Yiga Clan as they were still servents of Ganon. She was pleased Zelda and Link started getting along after Link had foiled another assassination attempt. As signs of Ganon's imminent return increased, Urbosa feared Zelda would run out of time to awaken her power and chose to pray to the late Queen of Hyrule's spirit instead of Hylia who failed to answer Zelda's prayers indicating Urbosa had more faith in Zelda's mother than Hylia. Additionally Urbosa took up the late Queen's habit of affectionately calling Zelda her little bird.
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[158][159][160][161][162][163] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[164] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[142][165] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[166]
Princess Zelda and the Great Deku Tree are not viewed interacting during the events of Ocarina of Time or The Wind Waker, but the Great Deku Tree seems to be aware of how Zelda's destiny is tied with Link's in Ocarina of Time, and tells Link to seek her out after the defeat of Queen Gohma. However, their interaction is shown in Breath of the Wild, where Zelda appears to have great trust in the ancient tree deity as she entrusts the protection of the Master Sword to him. The Great Deku Tree is concerned about her, and Zelda is comfortable in confiding to him that the Master Sword spoke to her. The Great Deku Tree holds Zelda in great regard, poetically describing her smile as being like the sun and hopes Link can save her in order to see her smile once more. He also politely refused to pass on a message from her to Link, suggesting to Zelda that it would be better if she told him herself, showing that he had faith in Link and Zelda reuniting with each other.
Throughout the lifespan of The Legend of Zelda series, a number of games (including main series games as well as re-releases and spin-offs) in varying states of completeness have had their releases cancelled. Perhaps the earliest of these was Gottlieb's The Legend of Zelda Pinball Machine (cancelled 1993). After securing a license from Nintendo to produce two Nintendo-franchise-based pinball machines, pinball designer Jon Norris was tasked with designing the table. Before it was completed, Gottlieb decided to repurpose the game with an American Gladiators theme. Licensing for this version ultimately fell through and the game was released as simply Gladiators (November 1993).[103]
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][82] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][83] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[84] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[85] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[86] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[87]
Forward smash Charge Shot 11.5%-19.5% Mega Man charges up energy in his Mega Buster, before firing off a bigger and more powerful burst that functions like a Smash Attack. Like regular Mega Buster shots, this shot disappears after traveling a moderate distance. The longer it is charged, the further the resulting shot will go, and its size, damage and knockback also increase significantly when it is fully charged. Fully charged, this is the longest-reaching forward smash in the game, although it has travel time to compensate. Based on the Super Mega/Rock Buster's Charge Shot from Mega Man 4 onwards. Interestingly, despite dealing electric damage, the Charge Shot has a hitlag multiplier of only 0.3x.
A Link Between Worlds features some gossip told to Link by the Rumor Guy. He tells Link that one of the castle staff had seen Zelda sneaking off every night. When she followed her, she saw Zelda staring at the painting in Hyrule Castle depicting the Link and Zelda from A Link to the Past cuddling with each other, implying they became more intimate with each other. This also hints the Zelda in A Link Between Worlds wants to have a similar relationship with the Link of her time.
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