In 2002, a follow-up series to the Mega Man X franchise was developed for the Game Boy Advance which starred Zero, a character created for the Mega Man X series as a sidekick/ally of Mega Man. The series revolved around Zero battling a powerful human-supremacy force as he protects the oppressed remaining reploids. In the Mega Man Zero series, the gameplay is largely similar to Zero's play style in the later Mega Man X games and features an in-depth ranking system that rewards the player with new abilities and enhancements (such as copied abilities from boss characters) in exchange for better play performance. In the fourth game, Zero can also physically steal weapons from enemies (such as axes and guns).
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Super Mario Kart was the first entry in the series, released for the SNES in 1992. The game has a total of eight playable characters who, when computer-controlled, use special power-up items specific to each character (such as eggs for Yoshi). The twenty tracks in this game, based on locations in Super Mario World (such as Donut Plains), are all short in length compared to other tracks in the series; thus, they are raced in five laps instead of the usual three. Whereas most other playable characters have reappeared in all later entries in the series, Koopa Troopa has only returned intermittently, and Donkey Kong Jr. would never again be used as a playable character, except for two Mario Tennis games. Unlike other games in the series, Super Mario Kart allows players only a limited number of lives, which are lost whenever a racer loses and is "ranked out". A notable aspect of the game's presentation is its use of the SNES's Mode 7 graphics technology, which allows for free rotation and scaling of planes to give a three-dimensional appearance.

What he means by this is that Zelda's mother couldn't teach how to access the power to seal Gannon away. As Zelda grew older, she became the gossip mongers favorite subject. Behind her back, they whispered how she was heir to the throne of nothing and how she was a failure. She grew frustrated when Link became her guard, and she expressed that feeling by shouting at him.
I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.
Since the original The Legend of Zelda was released in 1986, the series has expanded to include 19 entries on all of Nintendo's major game consoles, as well as a number of spin-offs. An American animated TV series based on the games aired in 1989 and individual manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo have been produced in Japan since 1997. The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo's most prominent and successful franchises, selling over 80 million copies as of 2017; many of its games are considered by critics to be among the greatest video games of all time.

In Breath of the Wild, Princess Zelda is shown to have an interest in ancient Sheikah technology and relied on the assistance of her Sheikah allies Impa, Purah, and Robbie when Link was critically injured during the Great Calamity. For the next century, Impa, Purah and Robbie have continued to dedicate themselves to helping Link until full recovery, in the hope that their assistance will allow him to defeat Calamity Ganon and free Princess Zelda. Even though most of the Sheikah remain loyal to her and the Kingdom of Hyrule, the Yiga Clan are shown to have dedicated themselves to serving Ganon and eliminating any who stand in his way, due to their previous mistreatment by the people of Hyrule.

At the story's start, she takes Link, whom she has been childhood friends with since they were infants, to the Picori Festival in Hyrule Town. During the ceremony following the Picori Festival Tournament, she is turned into stone by the winner, Vaati. Vaati is an evil mage searching for a legendary Light Force, and knowing Zelda has mystical powers of her own, he wants to keep her out of the way. Later, discovering that her power is, in fact, the Light Force, Vaati invades Hyrule Castle and abducts the petrified Princess, planning to sacrifice her and become a god. Link, after reforging the Four Sword, attacks the castle and faces off against Vaati. Upon defeating the evil mage, Link uses the power of the Four Sword to restore Zelda, who tells Link she had seen him on his adventure as if through a dream, to normal. Zelda then uses the power of the Magic Cap and Light Force to return Hyrule to its natural state. The overflowing power of life causes the Minish Cap to break apart. Ezlo then states that Zelda's kindness as well as the power of the Minish Cap (or Light Force, in the Japanese version of the game) created a miracle. With the time to part nearing, Zelda and Link see Ezlo off as he returns to the Minish World.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14] 

Mario Kart Wii is a kart racing game featuring single-player and multiplayer modes. The players control of one of many selectable Mario franchise characters and participate in races or battles using karts or bikes on courses thematically based on locations from the Mario franchise. During gameplay, the player views the action from a third-person perspective that tracks the player from behind his or her kart. The player can perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, drifting, slipstreaming, and wheelies (bikes only).[3]
100 years prior to the events of Breath of the Wild, Zelda met with the Champions. After meeting with them, she left the Castle to research ancient technology, but she did not come across anything of note.[138] During this time, she felt the presence of Ganon and devoted herself to learning all she could about ancient relics in order to stop him.[139] She then met with a fortune teller who told her a prophecy, to which Zelda felt that there was not much time left.[140] The following day, Link was appointed as Zelda's knight, to Zelda's chagrin.[141] During the ceremony, Urbosa explains that Link is a living reminder of Zelda's own failures.[142] Link and Zelda then set out to Goron City to make adjustments to the Divine Beast Vah Rudania to make it easier for Daruk to control.[143] During their journey to Eldin, Zelda comes to a stop and asks him how proficient he is wielding his Sword and asks him if he can hear the voice within the blade.[144]
Gifted with a perfectly serviceable faux-3D makeover, and a plot that couldn’t matter less if it tried, 11 once again pits its robot hero against the forces of the cartoonishly nasty Dr. Wily. Said battle comes in the form of eight new stages to run and gun through, with eight new bosses lurking at their ends. Despite boilerplate names like Block Man, Impact Man, and Torch Man, this is easily the most colorful bunch of baddies the series has ever offered up, varying wildly in size, and featuring sharp little details like the electrodes poking jauntily out of Fuse Man’s silhouette. That same love has been lavished on the way they fight, too: Rather than execute a few simple patterns of jumps and attacks, each boss battle is now a multi-phase affair, with enemies tossing out super moves and even the occasional full-on transformation. All of these flashy theatrics—which put a welcome edge onto the long-standard process of learning and overcoming a boss—are empowered by the Double Gear system, the game’s one big contribution to the Mega Man canon. A fancy way of saying “short-lived bursts of extra power or speed,” the Gears’ powers aren’t just confined to your enemies. They’re also the biggest tool in Mega Man’s new arsenal—and in the game’s efforts to justify its existence as more than just a pleasant but brief nostalgic stint.

There’s a cleverness and care that seems infused throughout Mega Man 11, and numerous creative touches surprised me as I played. Bounce Man’s rubbery body is flecked with bits of metallic confetti, like a bouncy ball from a toy vending machine. Block Man’s level is inspired by Mayan art and architecture, supporting the robot’s backstory in which he fantasizes about building his own temple. Each of the game’s new Robot Masters is given dozens of catchphrases and punny quips. “Prepare to diode!” Fuse Man will say, appealing to my inner dad joke enthusiast.
Wii U Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U in 2014, introduces anti-gravity sections that allow players to drive on walls and ceilings, allowing for more alternate paths in courses. In these sections, a player can bump into other racers or special bumpers to trigger a Spin Boost, which gives them an extra speed boost. The game also introduces all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), allows the player to view replay data from others and upload highlights to YouTube via "Mario Kart TV", introduces the Koopalings as new playable characters, and allows up to four people to play in Grand Prix races. Baby Rosalina and Pink Gold Peach are also introduced as new characters to the Mario franchise. Additional characters, vehicles, and tracks have been released as downloadable content, including actual Mercedes-Benz vehicles. Characters that have been released as add-on content include Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, the returning Dry Bowser, Link from The Legend of Zelda, and the Villager and Isabelle from Animal Crossing; tracks themed after various non-Mario game series have also been made available as add-on content. Additionally, Mario Kart 8 is notable for being the first game in the series to boast HD graphics and live-orchestrated music, as well as the first to receive post-release updates adding new features and enhancements, including rearranged post-race options, 200cc, and support for Nintendo's amiibo line of figurines.
In Ocarina of Time, Link met up with a mysterious member of the Sheikah Tribe, fittingly called Sheik. This person taught Link a multitude of different songs and gave him tips on how to proceed in his quest. At the end of the game, Sheik revealed himself to be none other than Princess Zelda in a disguise.[3] During the seven years Link had been asleep while maturing to become ready to fight Ganondorf, Zelda had gone underground and taken the disguise as Sheik so that Ganondorf would not find her in his search for the two remaining pieces of the Triforce, one which was held by Princess Zelda herself.[72][73]
Tetra is skilled with a catapult (or so she assures Link), and it is reasonable to assume she knows how to use the bombs she has her pirate crew steal at one point. As a member of the Royal Family, she can use the Pirate's Charm to communicate with its holder and keep an eye on his doings within a certain range. Curiously, she is much more tan as Tetra than when she assumes her Princess Zelda form. At the end of The Wind Waker, she resumes her identity as Tetra and sets sail with Link in search of the land that will become the New Hyrule. This leads into the events of Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks.
Every time a new Zelda game comes around, I can’t wait to explore its dungeons. There’s just something about that feeling of progression– collecting keys, opening chests, solving puzzles, tackling larger-than-life bosses– that speaks to me. It’s certainly no coincidence that my favorite Zelda entries are those with the strongest dungeons. Indeed, for many fans, these sections have been an integral part of the series. That said, not every dungeon receives a ton of love. From Ocarina of Time’s Water…
During Linkle's Tale, Princess Zelda learns the magic of the Twilight Realm threatens Hyrule and leads a small group of Hyrulean Forces to stop it while her allies prepare to defeat Hyrule's enemies. Midna however follows her and meets Linkie who shows her a mysterious crystal that restores Midna's true form. Together they team up to help Zelda who is imprisoned by dark constructs of Twili Midna and Zant created by the out of control Twilight magic. Linkie and Twili Midna free Zelda and Twili Midna shatters the crystal to seal the Twilight magic at the cost of becoming cursed once more reverting to her Imp form though she is fine with it as Hyrule and Zelda are safe. Linkie inspired by Midna and Princess Zelda's selflessness decides to continue on her journey to Hyrule Castle instead of simply joining them.
Zelda as Tetra displayed a tomboyish demeanor, taking challenges head on and even seeming bossy at times. At the beginning of the game, she does not think much of Link due to his habit of taking actions without thinking things through, and also due to the fact that he gets melancholic as they are setting sail to the Forsaken Fortress to rescue his sister.[117] Once Tetra discovers her true identity, she gains more respect towards the young hero, and apologizes for all that has happened to him and Aryll.[118] While Link and the King of Red Lions set out to look for the pieces of the Triforce of Courage, Zelda stays hidden away in a basement located inside Hyrule Castle in order to prevent getting caught by Ganondorf.[119] However, she is eventually found and is taken to Ganon's Tower, where Link must rescue her after assembling the Triforce of Courage.[120]

Available for the console's standard retail price of £279.99, this Nintendo Switch console deal comes with a copy of the ultra-popular (and ultra-amazing) Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, the moustachioed plumber's latest karting adventure. The game is included as a digital download code meaning you can simply hook your console up to the internet when it arrives, pop in the code, and you'll have a shiny copy of the game waiting for you. Lovely.

Jump up ↑ "I find your protests inelegant. Not to mention irrelevant. I wish to possess your beauty, Princess Zelda of Hyrule, not all these ugly words of yours! Oh, you are going to make for a spectacular painting, my dear! [...] Haha! My lovely masterpiece! How utterly scrumptious! Dare I say, it's my best work ever!" — Yuga (A Link Between Worlds)
Nintendo argued that the MariCar name was "intended to be mistaken for or confused with" Mario Kart, citing games commonly known by abbreviations in Japan, such as Pokémon (for Pocket Monsters) and Sumabura (Super Smash Bros.). In January 2017, the Japan Patent Office dismissed the objection, ruling that MariCar was not widely recognized as an abbreviation of Mario Kart.[24]
As Sheik, the character is completely different. Sheik is not only extremely fast, but also easy to control, making her a very popular character both in casual circles and in the tournament scene. Her close range attacks are possibly the fastest and most easily chainable of any character, with her martial arts training allowing fluid and swift ninja-like attacks. Sheik is at her best when using her speed and high-momentum attacks for an evasion-based "hit-and-run" offense. Her needle throwing attack is extremely flexible, and can be used to start combos or keep the enemy at bay. Her chain whip, while situational, is an excellent way to sabotage an opponent's strategy by interrupting their movements. Her Deku Nut-concealed vanish move is shorter than Farore's Wind but leaves Sheik much less open to attack, and is easier to use as an attack as well.

The majority of the music in the series—including the main recurring themes, and the full official soundtracks for the first ten games in the main series—was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, and has been praised as one of the greatest aspects of the series.[15][16][17] The music has had a broad musical palette, taking influences from classical symphonic music, heavy metal and techno-electronica.
Game runs at a solid 60 fps, but when it is 3 or 4 player split-screen, the frame rate noticeable drops to 30 fps. Still playable though. Online was pretty smooth, and out of all the matches I played, I very rarely lost connection and when I did, it was during a lobby instead of during races. Mario Kart TV is a very nice touch since it saves the last 12 races that occurred. My petty complaint of it is that it doesn’t show the exact things you saw on your screen.
The Impa from Ocarina of Time is a survivor of the mysterious Sheikah race. She protects and cares for Zelda, teaching Zelda and Link the ancestral melody known informally as Zelda's Lullaby, and fleeing the castle with Zelda when Ganondorf threatens the Princess in his attempt to enter the Sacred Realm. Impa then teaches Zelda the ways of the Sheikah, allowing her to hide in plain sight for seven years while she awaits Link's return. Impa is eventually revealed to be the Sage of Shadow, who must guard the Shadow Temple. Zelda also showed her care for Impa even in her disguise as she seemed troubled at the possibility of Impa being in danger.
Although not the first game to be released outside of Japan, Final Fantasy VII was the first overseas to popularize the series, and the JRPG genre.[5][6] Although the game is still the best-selling game in the series, with over 11 million units sold between its original release and subsequent re-releases,[7] the series has continued to find financial success since and has become the company's best-selling franchise worldwide.[2]

The second game, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, was released for the Famicom Disk System in Japan on January 14, 1987,[56] and for the Nintendo Entertainment System in Europe in November 1988 and North America in December 1988. The game exchanged the top-down perspective for side-scrolling (though the top-down point of view was retained for overworld areas), and introduced RPG elements (such as experience points) not used previously or thereafter in the series. The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II were released in gold-coloured cartridges instead of the console's regular grey cartridges. Both were re-released in the final years of the Nintendo Entertainment System with grey cartridges.
Mario Kart Wii supported online play via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection until its discontinuation on May 20, 2014.[8] Versus and Battle modes were available and supported up to twelve participants, and up to two players could connect and play from the same Wii console. Players could compete against random players from within the same region or from any continent, or could compete only against players registered as friends. At the end of each race or match, each player's VR (versus rating) or BR (battle rating) would change based on their final ranking. Mario Kart Wii featured the "Mario Kart Channel", which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu, that presented current regional or worldwide rankings for Time Trials, and the option of sending or receiving ghost data via WiiConnect24 (it is no longer supported and does not function as of June 28, 2013). Mario Kart Channel also offered worldwide tournaments from Nintendo, which were modified courses that sometimes had special objectives. There were two tournaments hosted each month.[9][10]
Three years after this, Dr. Wily, now working together with Dr. Light, went to investigate the ruins because the electromagnetic field started increasing, this being a good chance to clear his name. After a few days of search, Wily uncovered an ancient alien super computer inside the temple, Ra Moon, which revived his various Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and Mega Man 3 by analyzing the information about them in Dr. Wily's laptop. Wily thought it would be a great chance to conquer the world.
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, a remaster of the original GameCube game, was released by Nintendo on September 20, 2013, digitally on the Nintendo eShop in North America with a retail release on September 26 in Japan, October 4 in North America and Europe, and October 5 in Australia. A month later, Nintendo released The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds for the Nintendo 3DS, which takes place in the same setting as A Link to the Past.[92][93]
Princess Zelda is often shown as a beautiful and elegant princess, with the exception of Skyward Sword, where she is portrayed as an ordinary girl before the kingdom of Hyrule had been established. She is always either a child, teen, or young adult. Her hair color is depicted as blonde in most games of the series, as well as brunette in Twilight Princess and red in The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link. Her eyes are portrayed in different shades of blue throughout all the games, with the exception of her green eyes in Breath of the Wild. Her ears are pointy, as is characteristic of all Hylians, although in some games her ears tend to be shorter than in others. The dresses that she wears are long with determinate colors, such as different tones of pink, white, and blue. Most of her dresses are shown with the Hylian Crest, and in almost every game, she is seen wearing a tiara with either a red, pink, or blue jewel in it. In some games, she also wears long gloves. Princess Zelda is seen wearing makeup in most games, such as in The Wind Waker and Spirit Tracks, and her hairstyle is characterized either with her hair down or with braids. She wears high heels, although in Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword, and Breath of the Wild she wears boots. She also occasionally wears sandals, such as in Skyward Sword and Breath of the Wild.
The Legend of Zelda was principally inspired by Shigeru Miyamoto's "explorations" as a young boy in the hillsides, forests, and caves surrounding his childhood home in Sonobe, Japan where he ventured into forests with secluded lakes, caves, and rural villages. According to Miyamoto, one of his most memorable experiences was the discovery of a cave entrance in the middle of the woods. After some hesitation, he apprehensively entered the cave, and explored its depths with the aid of a lantern. Miyamoto has referred to the creation of the Zelda games as an attempt to bring to life a "miniature garden" for players to play with in each game of the series.[11]
In 2011, an unnamed Zelda 25th Anniversary Compilation was cancelled. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series, Nintendo of America originally had planned to release a compilation of games together for the Wii, similar to the collector's edition disc released for the GameCube in 2003. However Nintendo of Japan's president Satoru Iwata and Shigeru Miyamoto disagreed in releasing it, believing it would be too similar to the Super Mario 25th Anniversary game released in 2010.[111]
I’ve been getting a bunch of emails about Mega Man Legends 2 being made available on PSN. Which speaks to the popularity of the game, I think. I’ve been trying to keep the Game List and Game Counter updated with these sorts of re-releases, but otherwise I haven’t been announcing them all. This may have been an oversight on my part; if you have one of these systems that supports downloadable titles, be sure to browse through the Game List and see if any of them catch your eye!
Available for the console's standard retail price of £279.99, this Nintendo Switch console deal comes with a copy of the ultra-popular (and ultra-amazing) Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, the moustachioed plumber's latest karting adventure. The game is included as a digital download code meaning you can simply hook your console up to the internet when it arrives, pop in the code, and you'll have a shiny copy of the game waiting for you. Lovely.
12% (sourspot) Fires Mega Man's fist downwards. The start of the move sends opponents flying horizontally (sweetspot). If hit near the move's end, the move is a meteor smash, which will send any opponent in the air downwards (sourspot), one of the very few projectiles in the game with this trait. Although safer than most other meteor smashes, this move requires a set distance between you and your opponent in order to meteor smash and has long startup, making the move situational and outclassed by his other edgeguarding options.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[92][93][94] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[93][95] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[96]
Like its previous installments of games, Mario Kart Wii incorporates playable characters from the Mario series, who participate in kart races on various race tracks using specialized items to hinder opponents or gain advantages. The game features multiple single-player and multiplayer game modes including a four person split screen. Online multiplayer via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was available at launch, but was discontinued in May 2014, along with other Wii and Nintendo DS games that supported online play.[2] Many fans have created alternative servers to continue playing on, one of the more notable being Wiimmfi.

More than 100 Shrines of Trials to discover and explore - Shrines dot the landscape, waiting to be discovered in any order you want. Search for them in various ways, and solve a variety of puzzles inside. The tasks you must perform in each Shrine varies, and you'll never expect the challenges you'll face until you enter. Some will involve realistic physics, and some will require you to harness the power of nature, including electricity, wind, fire, and more. Work your way through the traps and devices inside, utilizing your runes and think outside the box to earn special items and other rewards that will help you on your adventure.
Forget everything you know about The Legend of Zelda games. Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule In this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on Nintendo Switch, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.

Another common theme is rebellion. The protagonists are often forced to fight a higher power either on a quest for revenge, for freedom or another motivation. The higher power can range from an empire, such as the Gestahlian Empire from Final Fantasy VI, a religion, such as Yevon from Final Fantasy X, or a deity, such as the fal'Cie from Final Fantasy XIII. During the journey to vanquish these powers their threat escalates, until the protagonists free the world of the oppressor(s).
Zelda is depicted as a kind and benevolent ruler with a wisdom beyond her years and a deep love towards the people she watches over. She is a caring, graceful and self-sacrificing person.[25][26] Zelda's most prominent display of compassion and selflessness was when she saved the life of Midna, the Princess of the Twilight Realm, who had been nearly killed by the false King of the Twilight, Zant.[27] Zelda's wisdom is her most valuable attribute. As a matriarch, it is imperative that she make the wisest decision concerning the fate of Hyrule; in Twilight Princess when Zant threatened her life and the lives of all of her subjects, she wisely surrendered to him.[28] She upholds her responsibilities no matter the cost and is always willing to help her friends, such as in Skyward Sword, where Zelda faces her duties as the goddess reborn and willingly remains in a deep sleep to keep Demise imprisoned within his seal.[29] Above all, Zelda is known to be a forgiving person even towards those who have harmed her before, as seen in Spirit Tracks, where she asks Anjean to take care of Byrne even though he was the one who stole her body.[30]

Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
In Skyward Sword, Zelda, daughter of Gaepora, lives in Skyloft with her childhood friend Link,[43] where they are both students at the Knight Academy.[44] After playing the role of the goddess at the Wing Ceremony, Link and Zelda go for a flight together, when suddenly a twister pulls Zelda and her Loftwing below the clouds. This phenomenon is later revealed to have been caused by Ghirahim, who needs Zelda's soul to resurrect Demise, his master.[45][46] Upon Zelda's arrival on the Surface, however, she is rescued by Impa before the Demon Lord can capture her.[47] Link then begins to look for Zelda and eventually finds her in the Earth Spring, but Impa impedes him from reaching the young girl,[48] and instead urges Zelda to continue praying at each goddess statue to finish purifying her body.[49][50]
Grand Prix – Players compete in various "cups," groups of four courses each (five in Super Mario Kart) with difficulty levels based on the size of the engine, larger engines meaning faster speeds. Before Mario Kart 8 there were four difficulties: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and 150cc Mirror (courses that are mirrored in terms of direction). Mario Kart 8 added a fifth difficulty level: 200cc. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race and the top three players with the most points overall will receive a trophy.
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