When you get into the harder levels in the Grand Prix it will be completely normal to be hit with two or three things in a row. For example say you're a few seconds ahead, they will hit you with a pow, red shell, and a lightning bolt in a row to keep you stopped for several seconds. The suspicious part is how did the AI time firing the red shell so it would catch up just after you got hit with the pow?
In Grand Prix, one player is required to race against eleven (formerly seven) computer-controlled characters in a "cup," a series of four races (five in Super Mario Kart). Mario Kart games typically have four recurring difficulty levels: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and an extra "Mirror" mode (where tracks are inverted left-to-right); starting in Mario Kart 8, a fifth difficulty level, 200cc, was added. As the player progresses through the cups, the courses become more difficult, and as the difficulty level increases, the vehicles go faster. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race. In earlier games, if a player finishes in a lower position, they must replay the race and may not proceed until a higher placing is achieved. The racer with the highest number of points after all races have been completed wins a trophy: bronze for third place, silver for second, and gold for first. Grand Prix is also playable in multiplayer mode for up to four players, though this does not affect the rest of the gameplay rules. Grand Prix is known as Mario Kart GP in the first three games.
Initially quite hostile and condescending towards Zelda, their relationship was not stable at first. This was to the point where she referred to Zelda as "Twilight Princess", presumably as a way to mock her and the state Hyrule was in. This changed though, when Zelda seemingly sacrificed herself to save Midna's life. This caused Midna to became more respectful and caring towards others.

The Crystal-theme can be said to be the overarching theme of the series, as a traditional Final Fantasy plot involves an antagonistic force trying to make use of the Crystals' power with the player power in opposition, sometimes chosen to wield the Crystal's power to enact their will as the Warriors of Light. Some games subvert this theme, such as Final Fantasy XII—where the Crystals are called nethicite—and the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy series with its various types of Crystal, showing that the power of the Crystals is not necessarily something that mankind should pursue despite its might.


The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]
Princess Zelda was set to appear in the unreleased game Mystical Seed of Courage. In the game, she was to be the one responsible for managing the four seasons of Hyrule, in a role similar to Din's in Oracle of Seasons. She would be kidnapped by Ganon, which, along with the disappearance of the Rod of Seasons, would cause Hyrule's seasons to go out of control.
Jump up ↑ "I find your protests inelegant. Not to mention irrelevant. I wish to possess your beauty, Princess Zelda of Hyrule, not all these ugly words of yours! Oh, you are going to make for a spectacular painting, my dear! [...] Haha! My lovely masterpiece! How utterly scrumptious! Dare I say, it's my best work ever!" — Yuga (A Link Between Worlds)

Many course themes recur throughout the series. Most are based on an existing area in the Mario franchise (Bowser's Castle being among the most prominent), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, but still belong in the Mushroom Kingdom, such as Rainbow Road.[3] Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas.[3] Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups", or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original Super NES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" (courses belonging to its own game) and 16 "retro" tracks (courses from previous Mario Kart games), spread across four cups each with four races. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, including Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.[5]

In addition, Nintendo celebrated the 25th anniversary of The Legend of Zelda game by releasing a Zelda game for all its current consoles in 2011: Link's Awakening in the 3DS's Virtual Console on June 7, Ocarina of Time 3D for the 3DS in mid-June, Four Swords Anniversary Edition[90] from September 28, 2011, to February 20, 2012, as a free DSiWare download and Skyward Sword for the Wii, which was released on November 18, 2011, in Europe; on November 20, 2011, in the United States; and on November 24, 2011, in Australia. A limited edition Zelda 25th anniversary 3DS was released on December 1, 2011, in Australia.[91]
Jump up ↑ "The prince immediately questioned the princess, but she wouldn't tell him anything. After the prince, the magician threatened to put the princess into an enternal sleep if she did not talk, but even still, she said nothing. In his anger, the magician tried to cast a magic spell on the princess. The surprised prince tried to stop him, but the magician fought off the prince and went on chanting the spell. Then, when the spell was finally cast, Princess Zelda fell on that spot and enter a sleep from which she might never awake. At the same time, the magician also fell down and breathe his last." (The Adventure of Link manual, pg. 7, 8)
 Phantom Slash's fully charged attack is now momentarily delayed, allowing Zelda to move around before the Phantom rushes forward. Zelda can set it as a trap and attack the opponent in tandem with the Phantom, or she can retreat behind it for protection. This also discourages the opponent from reflecting the Phantom since she now has enough time to respond with Nayru's Love.

Mario Kart 7 features stereoscopic 3D graphics, introduces hang gliding and submersible karts, and features an alternate first-person perspective and kart customization.[3] Introduces Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen as new playable characters. It is also the first Mario Kart game after Mario Kart: Double Dash!! not to feature Waluigi as a playable character.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[92][93][94] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[93][95] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[96]
Just like everyone else has said, this is Zelda meets Skyrim. Still that is an awesome idea, and it is executed almost flawlessly. I love open the world and how it will be hours before you see your first classic dungeon. In fact, the classic dungeons feel tighter and more creative than most of the temples from a lot of the last games. I haven't completed the game yet, but feel there is so much content here it will last me months before I complete it. I am writing this review as part of a contest

The art style, though, is certainly a treat. It's a little different, but it works. The game is fairly bright and colorful, but this is to be expected from the classic Mega Man series. The games were known for being more lighthearted than the X or Zero series, so the art style feels appropriate. Most the stage backgrounds are also rather nice, as are some of the enemy designs. There are a lot of familiar classic enemies as well as new ones.
"Skyward Sword" was released in 2011 and really put the Wii controller to the test. Other spin-offswere released for Nintendo's numerous handheld systems which show Link in unusual adventuressuch as "Link's Awakening" for the Game Boy (1993) or "A Link Between Worlds" for the 3DS (2014).For those who not only want a virtual adventure but also want to take home a slice of the hero'sfantasy world, the Zelda fan merch in the EMP Online Shop will not disappoint.
"The Legend of Zelda Theme" is a recurring piece of music that was created for the first game of the franchise. The composer and sound director of the series, Koji Kondo, initially planned to use Maurice Ravel's Boléro as the game's title theme, but was forced to change it when he learned, late in the game's development cycle, that the copyright for the orchestral piece had not yet expired. As a result, Kondo wrote a new arrangement of the overworld theme within one day.[7] The "Zelda Theme" has topped ScrewAttack's "Top Ten Videogame Themes Ever" list.[8]

Sheik is Princess Zelda's Sheikah alter ego in Ocarina of Time. Wearing a blue, possibly armored suit with the red Sheikah eye in the center, and with voice muffled and face concealed, the character is essentially unrecognizable and appears relatively masculine. It is possible that Zelda utilizes her magical skills in altering her appearance. Sheik plays a lyre and teaches Link new songs to help him on his quest. When Link arrives at the Temple of Time near the end of the game, Sheik transforms back into Princess Zelda.
Despite being a popular favorite with videogamers, Megaman hasn't had a new entry in years... until now. MEGA MAN 11 is a glorious love letter to past MM adventures. To a fault, it doesn't do anything majorly revolutionary, but considering the variable output of its sequels, it's at least gratifying to know that this turned out very well and easily better than the disappointing MIGHTY NO. 9. The game introduces a new "Double Gear" system, which provides opportunities for powering up or slowing down. Both of these are great additions. The gameplay remains as fun and glorious as it did for previous Mega Man entries. The graphic style is rendered in a clean, gorgeous hand-drawn style that feels very much at home with what you'd expect from classic MEGA MAN. There are cutscenes in the game, thankfully skippable, and yes, there's voice acting. Thankfully, the voice acting is for the most part pretty good and easily better than that of MEGA MAN 8 (Dr. Light's embarrassingly awful Elmer Fudd syndrome is thankfully gone in this one). The music has yet to catch me as truly memorable. It's passable stuff, although not quite as good as in previous MEGA MAN entries. All told, though, Capcom has done a fine job of producing a game that lives up to its predecessor, and it plays exceedingly smooth on Nintendo Switch with no noticeable hiccups. Fans of classic platforming, rejoice.

^ Jump up to: a b "Long interview with Eiji Aonuma". nindori.com. Nintendo DREAM. Feb 2007. Archived from the original on January 27, 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2010. 『時のオカリナ』から百数年後の世界です。 ... 『風のタクト』はパラレルなんですよ。『時のオカリナ』でリンクが7年後の世界に飛んで、ガノンを倒すと、子ども時代に戻るじゃないですか。『トワイライトプリンセス』は、平和になった子ども時代から百数年後の世界なんです。 / It is a world 100 and something years after Ocarina of Time. ... The Wind Waker is parallel. In Ocarina of Time, Link leaps to a world seven years later, defeats Ganon, and then returns to the child era, right? Twilight Princess is the world 100 and something years after peace is restored in the child era.
While I can overlook and even grudgingly appreciate the graphics, it’s the sound that is Mega Man 11’s biggest oversight. For a series so famous for its tunes, the sedate, repetitive, techno background is a real letdown: Why not just use cool, retro-sounding chiptunes like the rest of the games if you don’t have any strong new musical ideas? Mega Man 11 also has some terrifically bad voice acting, which I actually got a kick out of -- but eventually, the repetitive callouts (Speed Gear!) got on my coworkers’ nerves, prompting them to politely ask me to turn it down. You can choose to view subtitles and hear what few dialogue lines there are in Japanese, but if you did that you’d be missing out on Mega Man’s new, rich baritone -- only in English! I guess after 10 games in 31 years he really has become a Man.

Remember the neighbor kid who would dismantle perfectly good toys and mash the parts together to create strange creatures? Orville Wilson was that kid, and he still is. And after winning an art contest in elementary school, his mother said, "One day you'll be working for Hallmark." She was thrilled when her prophecy came true and, like any good mother, said "I told you so!" Learn more about Orville Wilson.
When transitioning to the next generation of video game consoles, the now-merged Square Enix developed Final Fantasy XIII for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. It was developed using Crystal Tools, a proprietary engine built to develop games for the consoles. As the first high definition title, it allowed for a major improvement in graphics with many reviewers citing its visuals as a strong point.[25][26][27] The original release of Final Fantasy XIV was also developed using Crystal Tools, though its subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, was developed using different technology.
+Wii U and Switch versions offer choice for the gamer. You don't have to upgrade to the Switch to experience BOTW. The Wii U version is every bit as great as the Switch one. In fact, I owned the Switch version but got rid of it in favor of the Wii U version. I did not see the point in upgrading since the only other Switch game I care about is Mario Odyssey and that doesn't come out for almost another year.

If you're like me and grew up playing Mario Kart, you'll see this one blows all the others out of the water! The characters are so much more detailed and they've introduced new ones: King Boo, Bowser Jr, Dry Bones, & Inklings (Boy and Girl), as well as kept the older ones. The tracks have greater visibility and the overall resolution is incredibly clear. They've added new tracks, but kept some old ones which brings back childhood nostalgia. The carts now glow and look more futuristic. We can now carry 2 items at once, and the Item Boxes now come with 2 items! Nintendo has outdone themselves and I am excited to continue to share my love for this game with my niece and nephew! I am writing this review as part of a contest.
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][94] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
Another common theme is rebellion. The protagonists are often forced to fight a higher power either on a quest for revenge, for freedom or another motivation. The higher power can range from an empire, such as the Gestahlian Empire from Final Fantasy VI, a religion, such as Yevon from Final Fantasy X, or a deity, such as the fal'Cie from Final Fantasy XIII. During the journey to vanquish these powers their threat escalates, until the protagonists free the world of the oppressor(s).
Link's adventures around the kingdom of Hyrule with Princess Zelda are not just restricted to the console at home. In 1989 there was an American animated series which was based on the first games and over time received a cult following. Since then, comics, books and other Zelda fan merch have become well-loved and have helped the series to become so well known. Most notably is the storybook "Hyrule Historia" which was released in 2011 for the series' 25th anniversary and offers a taste of Nintendo's successful story and their fascinating world.
Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.
Following Ganon's defeat, she assists Link in returning the Master Sword to its Sacred Pedestal to restore the seal on Ganon's Soul. When the darkness from Ganon's soul contained in the Pedestal leaks out to prevent Link from returning the sword, Zelda helps Link push the Sword into the pedestal, sealing away Ganon once again. The two then leave the Temple of the Sacred Sword together. Linkie's decision to follow her own path proves fortunate as Linkie later comes to Impa and the Hyrulean Forces aid while Link and Zelda are busy returning the Master Sword to its pedestal. After Linkie and Impa end up saving Hyrule in Link and Zelda's absence, Link and Zelda can be seen walking in Hyrule Field towards Hyrule Castle after restoring the seal.

Dash attack	Top Spin	1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8)	Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3. 
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