Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward.[101] Tetsuya Nomura was chosen to replace Amano because Nomura's designs were more adaptable to 3D graphics. He worked with the series from Final Fantasy VII through Final Fantasy X;[74][101] for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[111] Nomura is also the character designer of the Kingdom Hearts series, Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy.[112] Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI, and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and Final Fantasy XII.[40][113]

Original Article: Since its reveal in September, all signs have pointed towards the idea that World of Final Fantasy MAXIMA would be a digital-only release on Switch. Rumours started to circulate in October when physical editions for the Xbox One appeared with no Switch version in sight, and there were still no physical copies available when it finally launched last month.
Breath of the Wild is notably the first and only game where Link and Zelda held feelings of animosity towards each other, until they learned to open up to one another. Once learning to do so, the two came to genuinely care for one another, with both Hylians refusing to sacrifice each other for their own safety, no matter what peril they may be in. This is to the extent where Zelda unconsciously awoke her powers (despite previously being unable to do so, no matter how hard she tried) by shielding Link from a Guardian`s attack, showing how much he means to her. When Link temporarily died, Zelda wept at his body, lamenting his death. Upon learning from the Master Sword that Link can be revived, Zelda wasted no time rescuing Link, while also deciding to use her newfound powers to hold Ganon at bay.
Question mark boxes are arrayed on the race tracks and give power-up items to a player-character if their vehicle passes through them. Common power-ups include the Super Mushroom, which gives players a speed boost; the shells of Koopa Troopas, which can be thrown at opponents; banana peels, which can be laid on the track as hazards; Boo, who turns the player's kart invisible so that obstacles will not hit it and steals for them an item from another racer; a Bullet Bill, which sends the player rocketing ahead, plowing over other racers who get in the way; lightning bolts, which a player can use to electrocute and weaken all of the other racers; and the Starman, which renders the player's kart temporarily invulnerable to attack. The type of weapon received from an item box is often random, though sometimes influenced by the player's current position in the race. For example, players lagging far behind may receive more powerful items while the leader will only receive small defensive items. This gameplay mechanic is designed to give other players or computers a realistic chance to catch up to the leading player.
Outside of battles the player can explore the field for items, dialog with non-player characters, and for trading in gil for items and gear. In games featuring instanced random encounters, the party will encounter an enemy randomly while exploring dangerous areas (though abilities to reduce the encounter rate can be learned), while games with free-roaming enemies have enemies appear in the dangerous areas for the player to engage or avoid.
Mega Man's first animated appearance was as a main character in the 1989 series Captain N: The Game Master, which features a myriad of characters that had appeared on Nintendo consoles up until that time. They all aid the title character, Captain N, in his quest to save the world of Videoland, encountering many villains, including Mega Man's own enemy Dr. Wily. Mega Man is green and is voiced in this series by Doug Parker. His character also has a speech impediment and a tendency to add the word "mega" in front of words for emphasis.
To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series in 2011, Nintendo commissioned an original symphony, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. The show was originally performed in the fall of 2011 in Los Angeles and consists of live performances of much of the music from the series.[215] It has since been scheduled for 18 shows so far throughout the United States and Canada.[215][216] Nintendo released a CD, The Legend of Zelda 25th Anniversary Special Orchestra CD. Featuring eight tracks from live performances of the symphony, the CD is included alongside the special edition of The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword for the Wii. Nintendo would later celebrate The Legend of Zelda's 30th anniversary with an album which was released in Japan in February 2017.[217]

Zelda Month has come and gone much too quickly. But for those who might’ve missed it, PeanutButterGamer (PBG) released his final video for the month just over a week ago. PGB, who started Zelda Month in 2011, puts a twist on his traditional videos with a Zelda product review. In the video, he takes some of the most interesting Zelda items from eBay and, in usual PBG spirit, reviews them with a kooky flair and comical hijinks. Give it a…
In Sonic Lost World, a DLC stage based on The Legend of Zelda series was released in March 2014, named "The Legend of Zelda Zone". While built around the core gameplay mechanics of Sonic Lost World, "The Legend of Zelda Zone" incorporates some elements from the Zelda series, including a heart-based vitality meter, rupee collection, and a miniature dungeon to explore.[116]
For the first time (not counting the non-canonical Phillips CD-i games), it is possible to play as Zelda herself as Link aids the princess to escape the castle. Afterward, Link, Zelda, and Alfonzo attempt to escape via train, but the train crashes due to the tracks disappearing beneath them. Chancellor Cole then appears to attack Zelda and take her body, which he hopes to use to revive the Demon King Malladus; however, Zelda's spirit escapes and returns to Hyrule Castle. There, she meets with Link, now the only one who can see her, to continue their way to the Tower of Spirits, where Zelda learns she can inhabit Phantoms to aid Link. After this, she and Link begin their journey to restore the Spirit Tracks leading to the Tower of Spirits to fortify the Malladus's prison and thus prevent the resurrection of the Demon King.[127]
King Rhoam initially supported Zelda's research efforts though as signs of Ganon's return increased eventually he came to believe Zelda was using her studies as an escape and was neglecting her duty as Princess of Hyrule to play scholar unaware Zelda had been training as hard as she could and was using her studies to contribute without her powers. However King Rhoam put his duty before Zelda and scolded her during a Guardian test trying to convince her that she should be focusing every waking moment to awakening her power. Zelda however insisted she already was and tried to explain herself though King Rhoam refused to hear anymore excuses and forbid her from further research. Rhoam attempted to encourage Zelda by telling her that the gossip mongers had been whispering she would inherit a Kingdom of nothing and that it was her destiny to prove them wrong. This however had the opposite effect and led to her having a sense of self loathing due to her "uselessness in the battle field" and inability to awaken her innate powers. She continued to do research such as a survey of the Shrines alongside her Sheikah court poet in secret.
Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.
Gifted with a perfectly serviceable faux-3D makeover, and a plot that couldn’t matter less if it tried, 11 once again pits its robot hero against the forces of the cartoonishly nasty Dr. Wily. Said battle comes in the form of eight new stages to run and gun through, with eight new bosses lurking at their ends. Despite boilerplate names like Block Man, Impact Man, and Torch Man, this is easily the most colorful bunch of baddies the series has ever offered up, varying wildly in size, and featuring sharp little details like the electrodes poking jauntily out of Fuse Man’s silhouette. That same love has been lavished on the way they fight, too: Rather than execute a few simple patterns of jumps and attacks, each boss battle is now a multi-phase affair, with enemies tossing out super moves and even the occasional full-on transformation. All of these flashy theatrics—which put a welcome edge onto the long-standard process of learning and overcoming a boss—are empowered by the Double Gear system, the game’s one big contribution to the Mega Man canon. A fancy way of saying “short-lived bursts of extra power or speed,” the Gears’ powers aren’t just confined to your enemies. They’re also the biggest tool in Mega Man’s new arsenal—and in the game’s efforts to justify its existence as more than just a pleasant but brief nostalgic stint.
"Get ready to be at the centre of the ultimate fantasy adventure. Enter the world of FINAL FANTASY XV, and experience epic action-packed battles along your journey of discovery. You are Noctis, the Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Lucis, and your quest is to reclaim your homeland from the clutches of the imperial army. Joined by your closest friends, you will take the wheel and experience a voyage like no other, travelling through the breath-taking world of Eos encountering larger-than-life beasts and unforgiving enemies. You will learn to master the skills of weaponry and magic, channelling the power of your ancestors allowing you to effortlessly warp through the air in thrilling combat. Fresh faces and long-time fans, fulfil your destiny and experience a brand new kind of fantasy. Pre-order the Day One Edition to receive the exclusive FINAL FANTASY series weapon - the Masamune!"
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
As I understand it, Nintendo is keen to have a Zelda game launch on Switch every year. Following 2017 epic Breath of the Wild, 2018 had a port of spin-off Hyrule Warriors. Is Skyward Sword HD Nintendo's Zelda game for 2019? Nintendo traditionally turns up to The Game Awards every year with something new to show. And guess what - that's next week! Maybe we'll hear something then.
With only Link able to see her, Zelda helps him obtain a sword before the two make their way Tower of Spirits. There, Anjean tells the duo that Zelda's body contains a sacred power and that Cole took it in order to serve as a vessel for the Demon King, Malladus. Learning that she can inhabit Phantoms to aid Link, Zelda proceeds to help him restore the tracks and the Tower of Spirits to its former glory.
LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.
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