Mega Man set out to stop Wily and his robots again, who had stolen the new parts developed by Dr. Light and kidnapped Roll. If the player decides to pursue Wily, Mega Man will mention that Wily's scheming has ended, and then moves in close, presumably to apprehend him. However, he then reacts in shock when he discovers that "Wily" was in fact a mechanical duplicate. If the player decides to rescue Roll, Roll will apologize for worrying Mega Man before revealing she managed to steal some energy from the Wily Robot. In Mega Man's ending, Mega Man says he will bring peace for both humans and robots, and Dr. Wily informs Mega Man that he is no different than him, as he destroyed Wily's robots. Mega Man is in disbelief with what Wily said, but Dr. Light, Roll, and Auto appear to cheer him. Proto Man also appears if he was his partner. Mega Man starts feeling better, but Wily uses their distraction to escape again, and Mega Man starts to pursue him. His cooperative mode ending with Bass has him forced into a battle with Bass shortly after stopping Wily, despite both being significantly injured due to Bass wanting to fulfill his directive, although the conclusion is never revealed. In his cooperative mode ending with Duo, he wishes Duo luck as he proceeds to leave the planet with the energy.
Convinced that Ganondorf was after the Triforce, Zelda asked Link to find the three Spiritual Stones that would open the Temple of Time in order to prevent Ganondorf from opening the Door of Time and claiming the Triforce for himself.[66][67] Unfortunately, Ganondorf made his move before Link could return, leading an insurrection in the castle. He chased after Zelda, who had the Ocarina of Time in her possession, when Impa escaped with her from the castle. Dashing out of the castle town with Ganondorf in hot pursuit, Zelda caught sight of Link diving out of their way. She turned and threw the Ocarina of Time to him, trusting that he would keep it safe while Ganondorf chased after them.[68][69]
Realizing that it would be very difficult for the armies to stop Wily, Dr. Light knew something had to be done. Rock, having a strong sense of justice, volunteered to be converted from his current state as a lab assistant into a fighting robot, or rather, a super fighting robot. Thus, on May 25,[10] he became known as "Mega Man" (Rockman in Japan).
Mario Kart 64 is a go-kart racing game released for the Nintendo 64 gaming console system back in 1996. Mario Kart 64 is the second game in the series and the first game to feature a full 3D gameplay. The game has an assortment of powerups and characters with a cool Mario vibe. Each character has their own unique traits and set of attributes that will affect the gameplay. Race through different tracks and avoid the natural hazards and try to cross the finish line first! Good luck!
In 2011, an unnamed Zelda 25th Anniversary Compilation was cancelled. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series, Nintendo of America originally had planned to release a compilation of games together for the Wii, similar to the collector's edition disc released for the GameCube in 2003. However Nintendo of Japan's president Satoru Iwata and Shigeru Miyamoto disagreed in releasing it, believing it would be too similar to the Super Mario 25th Anniversary game released in 2010.[111]
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][82] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]

Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.


Since Mario Kart 64, all player-characters have been grouped into one of three distinct weight classifications. Smaller characters, labeled as "lightweights," have high acceleration but low top speeds, and lose a minimal amount of speed when off-road but are easily knocked aside by heavier opponents. Medium-sized characters, or "middleweights," have an equal balance of weight, top speed, and acceleration, and lose a moderate amount of speed when off-road. The largest characters, labeled as "heavyweights," can easily knock aside most opposing racers, have high top speeds but poor acceleration, and lose great amounts of speed when off-road.
Whether racing around an obstacle-filled track or battling in an arena, drifting and tossing items are the keys to Mario Kart success. Players can shake the Wii Remote while launching off a ramp to pull off a trick that will temporarily boost their speed. When riding a bike, players can gain additional speed by flicking the Wii Remote up and popping a wheelie

Just as there are multiple Links, there are multiple Zeldas throughout the series. Generally close in age to her respective Link, Zelda is most often portrayed as a child, but has been portrayed as a teenager or young adult on five occasions: in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
As Mega Man defeats each of the Robot Masters, he finds capsules of the strange energy Dr. Wily took from the island. When he returns to the lab, he gives the samples to Dr. Light for study, but the robot he found earlier breaks free and heads out to the desert. Mega Man goes after him and briefly fights him, but realizes that his opponent is holding back. Before he can consider it further, the robot flees and Proto Man appears, telling him that Wily's new headquarters is up ahead.
Jump up ↑ "I set out for Goron City today to make some adjustments to Divine Beast Vah Rudania. I still recall feeling his eyes on me as I walked ahead. The feeling stayed with me so long, I grew anxious and weary. It is the same feeling I've felt before in his company... And still, not a word passed his lips. I never know what he's thinking! It makes my imagination run wild, guessing at what he is thinking but will not say." — Zelda's Diary (Breath of the Wild)
In the story behind the original series, Mega Man is an android originally named Rock, created as a lab assistant by the scientist Dr. Light with Dr. Wily as his partner. Following treachery by Dr. Wily in which he reprogrammed most of Dr. Light's robots, Rock volunteered to be converted into a fighting robot to defend the world from Wily's violent robotic threats, thus becoming Mega Man.
The waiting comes into play again here with the hunts, which will be the majority of the filler busywork. Like 80% of the problem I have with the hunts in particular would be gone if they'd just let us be able to accept multiple hunts, but no - get one, finish one, report back to a tipster, repeat ad infinitum, which is especially fun with the few hunts that require special weather conditions. And of course, you can only do a slow jog in major cities to get back to a tipster (god I hate you Lestallum, why does the guy have to be way in the furthest corner of the bazaar), which means even MORE waiting. FFXII did multiple hunts just fine over a decade ago. What excuse does FFXV have?
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
Even after his crushing defeat at the hands of Mega Man, Dr. Wily was already planning his next scheme. If he could get his hands on the time machine (named Time Skimmer in the American manual) that was being developed at the Time-Space Research Laboratory (named Chronos Institute in the American manual), he thought he just might be able to change the past.
Although Sheik is intended to appear masculine, it is unclear whether Princess Zelda physically transforms herself into a male or simply dresses herself to look like one. When Link encounters Princess Ruto in the Water Temple, Ruto explains, "A young man named Sheik rescued me from under the ice". Later, when Link obtains the Water Medallion, Ruto asks, "If you see Sheik, please give him my thanks". Additionally, a Gossip Stone in the Hyrule Castle Grounds says, "They say that contrary to her elegant image, Princess Zelda of Hyrule Castle is, in fact, a tomboy!"
Forget everything you know about The Legend of Zelda games. Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule In this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on Nintendo Switch, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.


Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[124] Initially released for the PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving six months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its original release in Japan.[125] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and uses only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X, in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[126][127] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XIV both make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix.[128][129]
The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][116] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][94][116] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[197][198] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[199] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[200] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[201] Grandia,[202] and The Elder Scrolls.[200] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[203] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[204] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[117] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[205]
Of the various "Mega Men", classic series Rockman is the only one with blue eyes. All other characters to bear the name "Mega Man" have green eyes. Curiously in the PSP remake Mega Man Powered Up his eye color is changed to green (though the artwork for the game shows him with blue eyes). In the Mega Man Megamix illustrations, his eye color is also depicted as green.

Grand Prix – Players compete in various "cups," groups of four courses each (five in Super Mario Kart) with difficulty levels based on the size of the engine, larger engines meaning faster speeds. Before Mario Kart 8 there were four difficulties: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and 150cc Mirror (courses that are mirrored in terms of direction). Mario Kart 8 added a fifth difficulty level: 200cc. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race and the top three players with the most points overall will receive a trophy.
Custom 2 Danger Wrap 3% (loop), 7% (last) Fires an explosive wrapped in a bubble that floats upwards in an exponential arc and will explode if it comes into contact with an enemy, or on its own after a few seconds. Whilst harder to use than both the Crash Bomber and Ice Slasher due to its unusual trajectory, it deals more damage and knockback. It is based on Burst Man's weapon from Mega Man 7.
Ocarina of Time's follow-up, Majora's Mask, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game engine as the previous game,[71] and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist, relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives. It was originally called Zelda Gaiden,[72] a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story. Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur, unlike its predecessor. The game is darker,[71] dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends upon the land of Termina to destroy all life. All copies of Majora's Mask are gold cartridges. A limited "Collector's Edition" lenticular cartridge label was offered as the pre-order incentive. Copies of the game that are not collector's editions feature a normal sticker cartridge label. Majora's Mask is included in the Collector's Edition,[68] and is available on the Virtual Console, as well as a 3D port for the portable 3DS console.
Upon defeating Terra, Mega Man finds out that his nemesis, Dr. Wily, was ordering the Stardroids to dominate Earth. Mega Man sets off to the mad scientist's new base, the Wily Star to stop him. In the base, Mega Man has rematches with the Mega Man Killers, before facing off against the eight Stardroids once more (strangely, Terra does not appear again). After Wily is stopped once again himself, he releases a mysterious and ancient robot called Sunstar to destroy Mega Man. However, Sunstar disobeys and attacks Wily instead, and then turns his attention to Mega Man. The hero wins the battle and tries to convince Sunstar to be repaired by Dr. Light. However, while Sunstar would like to see such a world, he is already too badly damaged, and minutes later he explodes, taking the Wily Star with him. Mega Man escapes using Rush, and in the game's epilogue he again walks through the field seen in the opening sequence, pondering the recent events, when Wily makes one last, unsuccessful attempt to attack him. The game ends with Mega Man chasing Wily off the screen.
Mario Kart Wii had a successful launch and sold 300,000 copies on the launch day in Japan alone, compared to Mario Kart DS which sold 160,000 copies on its first day and Mario Kart: Double Dash which sold 180,000 on its first day.[33] In the week ending May 4, 2008, Mario Kart Wii had sold over a million copies in Japan alone, less than a month since its release in the region.[34] In the UK, Mario Kart Wii was the best-selling video game in the week ending April 12, 2008, having "the eighth biggest opening sales week in UK software history," according to Chart-Track/ELSPA.[35][36] The game dwarfed all other five Mario Wii games released up until then for the Wii combined when comparing first week sales.[35] In the United States, Mario Kart Wii was the second-best-selling video game in April 2008, selling 1.12 million copies, according to the NPD Group; putting it behind the Xbox 360 version of Grand Theft Auto IV and ahead of the PlayStation 3 version, both released in the same week.[37] It ranked the fourth-best-selling game of December 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 979,000 copies.[38] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 2.409 million copies in the United States, 687,000 in the United Kingdom, and 1.601 million in Japan, respectively, for a total of 4.697 million copies sold by August 1, 2008.[39] As of March 2009, Nintendo has sold 15.4 million copies of Mario Kart Wii worldwide.[40] As of January 4, 2009, it has sold 2,133,000 copies in Japan.[41] It is also the fourth-best-selling game of Japan in 2008.[42] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 856,000 copies in the United States, 394,000 in the United Kingdom, and 218,000 in Japan, respectively, for a total of 1.468 million copies sold in the third quarter of 2008 (July–September).[43] It was the second-best-selling game of 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 5 million copies.[38] In France, it sold 4.8 million units, which is more than it sold in Japan (3.7 million).[44]
Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule in this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on the Nintendo Switch console, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.
Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.
Neutral aerial Mega/Rock Buster 2% (shot), 2% (Mega Buster) Behaves identically to Mega Man's neutral attack, except Mega Man fires while jumping or falling in the air much like in his original games. The move has a sweetspot on the Mega Buster that has high base knockback and can serve as a surprise KO option when edge-guarding. Due to Mega Man's effective aerial movement, his neutral attack can be used as a very effective "wall" to deny approaches.
Sakaguchi wanted the game to have a simple abbreviation in the Roman alphabet (FF) and a four-syllable abbreviated Japanese pronunciation (efu-efu). "Fantasy" was chosen due to the setting, though "Final" was originally intended to be "Fighting", and was changed to avoid conflict with the tabletop game Fighting Fantasy.[4] Though Final Fantasy was released at a time when competing games, such as Sega's Phantasy Star and Dragon Quest III, were released, it pulled Square out of its financial crisis, and when released three years later in North America, outsold several of its peers.
There is so. much. waiting. in this game. Loading times are poorly optimized and take FOREVER if you aren't teleporting to somewhere close by where you just were. I'd say I'm spoiled by PC load times, except my old PC is a hunk of junk compared to the PS4's hardware. Driving is entirely uninteresting (save when you're doing the story driving missions, at least people talk then), and you have nothing at all to do in the up to 10 minute driving time except get suckered into nostalgia by the older FF soundtracks you can play, or look at the scenery. I should never have to pull out my cellphone and mess around on it out of boredom while I'm doing something that's supposed to be fun. It might also help to note that while you can "drive," it's pretty much an on-the-rails experience. If you try to veer too far to the right or left, Noctis will automatically correct it for you. So after trying it out once or twice, you're probably going to let your nanny/butler Ignis do the driving for you.
Mega Man 11 isn't perfect. It isn't a severely flawed game, but some of its flaws can really stand out. For the most part the level design is really good. There are many moments that encourage players to use the double gear system and the levels are lengthy enough that they can keep you busy. The difficulty of some levels, however, is definitely going to get to some players. For the most part any screw ups are your own, but there's a lot of trial and error in learning some of the levels, and even worse is that Mega Man 11 has a limited life count. If you get a game over it's back to the beginning of a level for you. The levels put up a great challenge, but their length and (in some levels) hazards can make starting the entire thing over again feel like a test in frustration. Even Mega Man veterans will have to slow down and really take time to learn these levels.

In Battle Mode, players go head to head on one of a number of dedicated Battle Mode courses, usually designed as closed arenas. Each player starts with three balloons and loses a balloon with every hit sustained; the last player possessing at least one balloon wins. In addition to the classic battle game, different variants of this mode were added as the series progressed, including one that involves capturing a Shine Sprite and maintaining possession of it for a certain period of time; and one that involves throwing Bob-ombs at other players to earn points. Starting with Mario Kart Wii, there is a time limit for each battle. For Mario Kart 8, the battles take place on race courses. In Mario Kart Wii, Mario Kart 7 and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, the player will respawn after losing all balloons, instead of getting eliminated.
Up smash	Spark Shock	2% (hit 1), 1.5% (hits 2-6), 6% (hit 7)	Mega Man turns both of his hands into electrodes, creating a powerful multi-hitting surge of electricity above him. It is overall useful due to its large hitbox, anti-air properties and quick startup, though it has noticeable ending lag. If an opponent is made tiny by a Lightning Bolt, it's possible to OHKO them. Based on Spark Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.

After putting 20+ hours into this game over the weekend I have decided it is far and above my favorite Zelda game. My most wonderful experience so far has been seeing an island a ways off the map, getting on a raft and leaving the map to check out said island, and it has a challenge where you lose all your items and have a mission to complete on the island. I sadly didn't beat the challenge (having 4 hearts is why) but it was an experience off the map (literally) and one you had to look our for to find. The game rewards you for leaving the path that letting you run wild. I feel as if I have done so much, but at the same time keep realizing I have barely scratched the surface of this masterpiece. GOTY for sure. This game is worth both the 60 dollars for it, and the 300 dollars for the switch.

Battle – Multiple human players use racing items to battle each other in a closed arena. Each player starts with three balloons and loses a balloon with every hit sustained; the last player possessing at least one balloon wins. Different battle types were added as the series progressed, as well as single-player battles. Starting with Mario Kart Wii, there is a time limit for each battle. For Mario Kart 8, the battles take place on race courses. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe reintroduces arena-style tracks.

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