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Previous featured articles Articles with non-canonical information Articles incorporating theory Hylians Princesses Sages The Legend of Zelda characters Zelda II: The Adventure of Link characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past characters The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages characters The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords characters The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker characters The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures characters The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap characters The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess characters The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks characters The Legend of Zelda: Mystical Seed of Courage Super Smash Bros. fighters The Legend of Zelda animated series characters Valiant Comics characters The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword characters The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds characters Hyrule Warriors characters The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask characters The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild characters
In Four Swords Adventures, Zelda used her telepathy to call Link to Hyrule Castle so she and him can join the Shrine Maidens to investigate the seal on Vaati at the Four Sword Sanctuary, due to ominous clouds of darkness covering Hyrule. However, while using their magic to check the seal, Shadow Link appeared and kidnapped Zelda and the six Maidens and sent Link to the Four Sword Sanctuary. This was all a trap by Shadow Link to cause Link to draw the Four Sword, releasing the seal on the Wind Mage Vaati, allowing him to escape.
Although he is not actually playable in the Bass and Proto Man modes, he still played a key role in those modes: In Proto Man mode, he was responsible for curing Proto Man when the latter started succumbing to Roboenza, and in both Bass and Proto Man mode endings, it is heavily implied that Mega Man was responsible for taking Wily to the hospital after the latter succumbed to influenza.

Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.


Some other manga series that have not been localized outside Japan include a 12-volume Rockman X adaptation by Yoshihiro Iwamoto, over 15 Classic and X adaptations by Shigeto Ikehara, a light-hearted adaptation of Rockman Zero by Hideto Kajima, a slapstick adaptation of Shooting Star Rockman by Masaya Itagaki, another Battle Network adaptation by Jun Keijima and Miho Asada called Rockman EXE Battle Story, and a short series of slapstick Battle Network and Star Force-themed adaptations by Takumi Kawano.

Take part in an epic and ever-changing FINAL FANTASY as you adventure and explore with friends from around the world. The starter edition is perfect for newcomers as it includes the award-winning FINAL FANTASY XIV: A Realm Reborn experience and lets you begin your adventure as the Warrior of Light all the way through level 50. Join others from around the world and start your own FINAL FANTASY adventure today!

Nintendo DS Mario Kart DS, released for the Nintendo DS in 2005, is the second title to be released on a handheld gaming system. It returns to the one-person karts used before Double Dash!!, and includes a new Mission Mode, where the player must complete eight missions (ranging from collecting coins to attacking enemies) in one of seven sets, and engage in battles with bosses from Super Mario 64 DS. The game makes use of the DS's dual-screen features by using the top screen to display the racer's kart and the bottom screen to show either a course overview or a bird's-eye view of the immediate vicinity. Dry Bones and R.O.B. (and Shy Guy for one-cartridge multiplayer mode) make their Mario Kart debut in this game, with this being R.O.B.'s sole appearance thus far. Mario Kart DS features a multiplayer mode where players can race each other using the DS Download Play feature or a multi-card wireless LAN service; additionally, it was also playable online via the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service until its termination in 2014. Furthermore, the use of unlockable retro tracks from earlier installments was reintroduced here and made a permanent feature of the series.
Overall, the Final Fantasy series has been critically acclaimed and commercially successful, though each installment has seen different levels of success. The series has seen a steady increase in total sales; it sold over 10 million units worldwide by early 1996,[134] 45 million by August 2003, 63 million by December 2005, and 85 million by July 2008.[135][136][137] In June 2011, Square Enix announced that the series had sold over 100 million units,[138] and by March 2014, it had sold over 110 million units.[139] Its high sales numbers have ranked it as one of the best-selling video game franchises in the industry; in January 2007, the series was listed as number three, and later in July as number four.[46][140] As of 2018, the series has sold over 142 million units worldwide.[141]

When you get into the harder levels in the Grand Prix it will be completely normal to be hit with two or three things in a row. For example say you're a few seconds ahead, they will hit you with a pow, red shell, and a lightning bolt in a row to keep you stopped for several seconds. The suspicious part is how did the AI time firing the red shell so it would catch up just after you got hit with the pow?


I'm eight chapters in, which I believe is a little over halfway through the game, and the plot is not drawing me in at all. Many Final Fantasies lead with the main narrative element of "defeat the evil empire that wrecked your home/kingdom/city/planet", and Final Fantasy XV is no exception. This is not a bad thing, but unfortunately whoever was in charge of piecing this into a cohesive narrative seems to have twiddled his thumbs for nine-tenths of the decade it took to make this game.. in fact, it honestly seems like this happened with the whole game. Ten whole years, and it feels like they rushed it out in the last year and a half. I can definitely see why they delayed it another few months from its initial September release date. Imagine what it would've been like then?
-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.

The NES controller had just two buttons, and in Mega Man 1-6 they corresponded to “jump” and “shoot.” Mega Man 11 has more buttons than it knows what to do with, but the Double Gear system employs two of them – the left and right shoulder buttons, specifically – to add a new element to each of Mega Man’s basic functions. With the Power Gear you can overcharge your weapons for alternate attacks and more firepower, though it costs so much weapon energy that I barely used it, but with the essential Speed Gear you can slow down time to dodge bullets, carefully land jumps, and catch your breath.


Game runs at a solid 60 fps, but when it is 3 or 4 player split-screen, the frame rate noticeable drops to 30 fps. Still playable though. Online was pretty smooth, and out of all the matches I played, I very rarely lost connection and when I did, it was during a lobby instead of during races. Mario Kart TV is a very nice touch since it saves the last 12 races that occurred. My petty complaint of it is that it doesn’t show the exact things you saw on your screen.
Several spin-off series have emerged over the past few years, each one continuing the Mega Man mythos in some unique way, including but not limited to Mega Man X, Mega Man Legends, and Mega Man Battle Network. A resulting animated series was also produced originally in the United States as well as a number of toys, comics, and collectibles available both in and outside of Japan.
Since the original The Legend of Zelda was released in 1986, the series has expanded to include 19 entries on all of Nintendo's major game consoles, as well as a number of spin-offs. An American animated TV series based on the games aired in 1989 and individual manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo have been produced in Japan since 1997. The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo's most prominent and successful franchises, selling over 80 million copies as of 2017; many of its games are considered by critics to be among the greatest video games of all time.
Overall, the Final Fantasy series has been critically acclaimed and commercially successful, though each installment has seen different levels of success. The series has seen a steady increase in total sales; it sold over 10 million units worldwide by early 1996,[134] 45 million by August 2003, 63 million by December 2005, and 85 million by July 2008.[135][136][137] In June 2011, Square Enix announced that the series had sold over 100 million units,[138] and by March 2014, it had sold over 110 million units.[139] Its high sales numbers have ranked it as one of the best-selling video game franchises in the industry; in January 2007, the series was listed as number three, and later in July as number four.[46][140] As of 2018, the series has sold over 142 million units worldwide.[141]
Since the original The Legend of Zelda was released in 1986, the series has expanded to include 19 entries on all of Nintendo's major game consoles, as well as a number of spin-offs. An American animated TV series based on the games aired in 1989 and individual manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo have been produced in Japan since 1997. The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo's most prominent and successful franchises, selling over 80 million copies as of 2017; many of its games are considered by critics to be among the greatest video games of all time.

Up aerial Air Shooter 3% (early hits), 2% (middle hits), 1% (later hits), 2% (latest hits) Mega Man fires a small tornado straight above him. It travels a fair distance, drawing in opponents who touch the tornado. It is based on Air Man's weapon from Mega Man 2. It can easily Star KO opponents even at low percentages, especially if the opponent tries to jump out of it. However, it will meteor smash Mega Man himself if it is reflected.


The traditional Mega Man boss design is another knock against the Power Gear as a useful ability. Because bosses already have vulnerabilities to certain weapons, there’s no point in amping up the weapons that already easily cut them down, and increasing the damage of weapons that barely do any is like upgrading your Nerf gun to Super Soaker. However, I found two pretty cool uses for the Power Gear. One is that Tundra Man’s T. Storm can be amplified to wipe out all enemies on screen like a more efficient Infinite Gauntlet. People watching me play in the office got a kick out of me hitting what amounted to the “nuke’em from orbit” button when frustration set in. The second is Impact Man’s P. Driver ability, which is a mid-air dash attack which is more useful for getting around because its charged form lets you zoom across the whole screen. See ya, disappearing block puzzle!
Though it’s also on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC, I felt compelled to first play Mega Man 11 on a Nintendo system, where the majority of the Mega Man games have lived. Here’s what you need to know about playing Mega Man 11 on Nintendo Switch: Unfortunately, there’s a small, but significant flaw in that the Y and B buttons on the right Joy-Con are too near the right thumbstick, and the classic Mega Man players’ pattern of shooting and jumping simultaneously can result in some accidental hits of the right thumbstick, which by default changes your weapons (you can turn this stick function off). Additionally, not having a D-pad on the left Joy-Con stinks. I also experienced some incorrect button signals getting to the television when playing in docked mode. Thankfully, all of this can be circumvented by using the Pro Controller (if you have one).

Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward.[101] Tetsuya Nomura was chosen to replace Amano because Nomura's designs were more adaptable to 3D graphics. He worked with the series from Final Fantasy VII through Final Fantasy X;[74][101] for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[111] Nomura is also the character designer of the Kingdom Hearts series, Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy.[112] Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI, and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and Final Fantasy XII.[40][113]
The series has received criticism for many other aspects. Many have found the menu-based combat system and its use of random encounters to be a turnoff, or an outdated annoyance,[54][55] with IGN stating the the use of random encounters "need[ed] to change".[56] The series' minigames have been divisive and often come under fire as weaker aspects[57][58][59] (although minigames have received praise in other regard[60]). Finally, many direct sequels in the series have been poorly received and believed to be worse than the original titles.[61][62][63]

Despite having an unusual set of moves, Mega Man shines in approaching while spacing opponents at midrange and disrupting any approaches, for he is blessed with two projectiles that can cause opponents to react predictably: Metal Blade's ability to be thrown in eight directions and trapping opponents in high hitstun makes it a fantastic mindgame and shield-baiting tool, while Crash Bomber can cause panicky opponents to run towards Mega Man or shield the explosion. Both projectiles easily lead to a grab punish as Mega Man owns a great grab combo ability, having a fast grab and many of his attacks connecting reliably after a throw. This allows him to rack up damage easily once he grabs an opponent. He does not have much trouble KOing once his opponents are damaged either, for he has many finishing options: from his lightning-fast up tilt to his projectile based forward smash which can be used to edgeguard. His other projectiles are terrific, notably his aerials; up aerial can KO early if an opponent is high up, and his down aerial is one of the safest meteor smashes in the game. To top it all off, Mega Man is a fantastic spacer: his jab is a fast and useful projectile (that can be used while moving and jumping) which interrupts most attacks and weak projectiles at a safe range, and when combined with Metal Blades and Crash Bombs makes Mega Man difficult to approach. Due to his amazing pressuring ability and grab game, characters without a projectile or with low reach can have trouble approaching without being severely punished. Even if he does get knocked around, Mega Man is a heavyweight character, weighing only slightly less than Captain Falcon, meaning he is more likely to survive potentially lethal blows that could KO a lighter character, especially with proper DI and his good recovery move, Rush Coil.
Start your engines & get set to play anytime with Mario Kart 8 Deluxe from Nintendo Switch. With more characters & lot, more battling & racing fun to have. Players can now choose from up to over 40 characters characters. Choose between Dry Bones, King Boo & Bowser Jr. along with the Inklings as all-new guest characters. With 48 different battle courses to race on, this definitive version of Mario Kart 8 is sure to incite & immerse players in that colorful & magical world of Mario Kart like never before. With its surreal gameplay & even marking the glorious return of DLC. It is everything a Nintendo fan could ask for & more. Available on the Wii U & Nintendo Switch. Go ahead & challenge your friends with the revised battle mode from the Wii U version. With the handheld mode, players can now challenge friends & racers around the world anytime, anywhere.
^ "Zelda: The interview!". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. November 17, 2004. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved May 30, 2010. NoE: How does the Minish Cap fit into the Zelda chronology? Is it a prequel to the upcoming The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures on GameCube? Aonuma: Yes, this title takes place prior to The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, and tells the secret of the birth of the Four Sword.
The actions made by this incarnation of Princess Zelda were crucial to the development of the Zelda Timeline, since it was through Zelda's choices that three timelines were eventually created, making her instrumental in the history of Hyrule. Her plot with Link to retrieve the Triforce resulted in Ganondorf obtaining the Triforce of Power,[67] eventually leading to Ganondorf besting Link in the final battle, and thus forming the Fallen Hero Timeline.[76] Should Link succeed in defeating Ganondorf, sending Link back to his own time afterwards created two timelines: the Child Timeline and the Adult Timeline. The latter of the two shatters the Triforce of Courage and vanquishes the hero in the Adult Timeline,[77] resulting in Hyrule eventually being flooded.
Custom 2 Plant Barrier 3% (circling), 4.2% (thrown) Mega Man summons flower petal-shaped units that orbit around him. The petals are more durable than the Leaf Shield, as they do not disappear when hit and deal slightly more damage when thrown, but they move slightly slower and have less range when thrown. The move is based on Plant Man's weapon from Mega Man 6.
Mario Kart (Japanese: マリオカート Mario Kāto) is a series of kart racing games developed and published by Nintendo as a spin-off of its flagship Mario franchise. It was inaugurated in 1992 with its debut entry, Super Mario Kart for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, which was critically and commercially successful. There have been a total of 14 titles in the series: 5 for home consoles, 3 portable games, 4 arcade games co-developed by Bandai Namco Entertainment, a port, and an upcoming mobile game.
The next two games, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, were released simultaneously for the Game Boy Color, and interact using passwords[73] or a Game Link Cable.[74] After one game has been completed, the player is given a password that allows the other game to be played as a sequel.[73] They were developed by Flagship in conjunction with Nintendo, with supervision from Miyamoto. After the team experimented with porting the original The Legend of Zelda to the Game Boy Color, they decided to make an original trilogy[75] to be called the "Triforce Series".[76] When the password system linking the three games proved too troublesome, the concept was reduced to two games at Miyamoto's suggestion.[77] These two games became Oracle of Ages, which is more puzzle-based, and Oracle of Seasons, which is more action-oriented.[78]
Despite these advantages, Mega Man is not without flaws. His grounded mobility is comparatively poor, with his dashing speed in particular being the 13th slowest in the game. This leaves Mega Man at a disadvantage against characters with better mobility, such as Sheik and Fox. Mega Man's melee attacks also have short range overall despite their extensive utility, causing him to struggle up close against characters with disjointed range like Marth, Link, and Shulk, while the high ending lag on his attacks puts more stress on this flaw. Mega Man's above average weight and falling speed also makes him an easy target for combos and juggles. Finally, Mega Man's projectile-heavy playstyle is also his biggest weakness, as he is heavily affected by powershielding, reflectors, absorbers, and other anti-projectile tools, which can shut down both his approach and defense options.
Before Dr. Light ever constructed what would eventually become Mega Man, he first designed the robot known as "Proto Man" ("Blues" in Japan) which similar to his name was designed as a prototype of his future creations. Dr. Light's achievement greatly exceeded his expectations, however, he found a critical problem on Proto Man's power reactor. He made plans to modify and repair him, but the robot ran away, fearing that he would lose his identity and become like a different person.
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
After Zelda was born, her parents named her Zelda in accordance with royal tradition and her mother would eventually take the infant Zelda to Gerudo Town to introduce her daughter to her close friend Gerudo Chieftain Urbosa. For the first six years of her life Zelda was raised by both parents and apparently had a happy childhood for a time. Her mother encouraged Zelda she could do anything and told her about the latent power she inherited from her grandmother whom is implied to have been a previous Zelda indicating her mother was not of royal blood. When Zelda was six years old, her mother died, changing her life and putting her under the protection of her father exclusively thereafter. Unfortunately her mother's death robbed her of her mother's unconditional support and prevented the Queen from acting as Zelda's teacher as she was apparently knowledgeable about Zelda's powers. However Zelda hide her grief as her parents had taught her to be a strong steadfast Princess which King Rhoam found inspiring though failed to see his daughter was hurting and her inability to awaken the sealing power needed to seal Calamity Ganon away, causing her great stress. Zelda struggled to awaken her powers and a year after her mother's funeral Urbosa accompanied Zelda to the Spring of Power where Zelda futilely prayed for her powers to awaken until Urbosa dragged her out of the cold water causing Zelda to break down and cry confiding her true feelings and revealing her grief and the stress she was under while Urbosa listened and consoled her. She ended up befriending Urbosa who did her best to help her. However Zelda came to believe her mother was wrong about her capabilities feeling more and more like a failure.
Game Boy Advance Mario Kart: Super Circuit for Game Boy Advance, developed by Intelligent Systems, was released in 2001 as the first Mario Kart title for a handheld console. It retains the traditional elements of Mario Kart established by its predecessors; however, it is not without its new additions. Mario Kart: Super Circuit is the first entry in the series to feature unlockable retro tracks from a previous installment (in its case, the Super Mario Kart tracks). It is also the first installment where, in addition to the usual trophy, the player is also awarded with a ranking based on their performance. During a linked VS mode with only one cartridge, players can only choose from the four SNES Mushroom Cup courses, and must play as a Yoshi of a specific color. If all players have a cartridge, all racers and courses are available. This is the first Mario Kart game to have a feature that allows players to swap ghost data, in its case via the use of the GBA's Link Cable.
Typically, characters can equip armor, weapons and accessories, where armor provides defensive boosts, weapons determine the strength and type of the attacks used, and accessories provide various supporting abilities or bonuses. There are rarely optimal sets of armor or accessories, though many games feature ultimate weapons for each character, often involving sidequests to obtain them.
The success of Mario Kart has spawned many cartoon-style racing games published by various gaming companies from the 16-bit generation onwards. It has also been referenced in the Paper Mario role-playing series and inspired several stages in the Super Smash Bros. fighting games. The games in the series have sold a combined total of over 100 million copies worldwide.
In 2011, to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the series, an art book was published exclusively in Japan under the name Hyrule Historia by Shogakukan. It contains concept art from the series's conception to the release of Skyward Sword in 2011 and multiple essays about the production of the games, as well as an overarching timeline of the series. It also includes a prequel manga to Skyward Sword by Zelda manga duo Akira Himekawa. The book received an international release by publisher Dark Horse Comics on January 29, 2013;[208] it took the number one spot on Amazon's sales chart, taking the spot away from E. L. James's 50 Shades of Grey trilogy.[209] Dark Horse released The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts, a follow-up art book to Hyrule Historia containing additional artwork and interviews,[210][211] in North America on February 21, 2017, and in Europe on February 23, 2017.[212]
The Minish Cap is a special Nintendo game. The only new Zelda game on the Game Boy Advance console, the game felt like having a grand SNES adventure in the palm of your hands. The Minish Cap was a rare example of a Nintendo sharing its series with other developers, as the game was developed by Capcom and Flagship. This remix of the Hyrule Town and Picori Festival themes was posted on OverClocked Remix by Lemonectric. The remix, called “A Bag Full…
At the story's start, she takes Link, whom she has been childhood friends with since they were infants, to the Picori Festival in Hyrule Town. During the ceremony following the Picori Festival Tournament, she is turned into stone by the winner, Vaati. Vaati is an evil mage searching for a legendary Light Force, and knowing Zelda has mystical powers of her own, he wants to keep her out of the way. Later, discovering that her power is, in fact, the Light Force, Vaati invades Hyrule Castle and abducts the petrified Princess, planning to sacrifice her and become a god. Link, after reforging the Four Sword, attacks the castle and faces off against Vaati. Upon defeating the evil mage, Link uses the power of the Four Sword to restore Zelda, who tells Link she had seen him on his adventure as if through a dream, to normal. Zelda then uses the power of the Magic Cap and Light Force to return Hyrule to its natural state. The overflowing power of life causes the Minish Cap to break apart. Ezlo then states that Zelda's kindness as well as the power of the Minish Cap (or Light Force, in the Japanese version of the game) created a miracle. With the time to part nearing, Zelda and Link see Ezlo off as he returns to the Minish World.
Beyond the circuit races you can also race against others online. This is fun as well but there are some good racers out there. I have yet to finish top 3 in an online race. The Wii also awards you points, or takes them away, based on how well you finish in online races. Good way to gauge how good of a racer you are. I wasn't paying huge attention when I first started racing online, but I think you start with 5000 points. I am down to about 4000 points, so still working my way back.
While I can overlook and even grudgingly appreciate the graphics, it’s the sound that is Mega Man 11’s biggest oversight. For a series so famous for its tunes, the sedate, repetitive, techno background is a real letdown: Why not just use cool, retro-sounding chiptunes like the rest of the games if you don’t have any strong new musical ideas? Mega Man 11 also has some terrifically bad voice acting, which I actually got a kick out of -- but eventually, the repetitive callouts (Speed Gear!) got on my coworkers’ nerves, prompting them to politely ask me to turn it down. You can choose to view subtitles and hear what few dialogue lines there are in Japanese, but if you did that you’d be missing out on Mega Man’s new, rich baritone -- only in English! I guess after 10 games in 31 years he really has become a Man.
Mario Kart Wii had a successful launch and sold 300,000 copies on the launch day in Japan alone, compared to Mario Kart DS which sold 160,000 copies on its first day and Mario Kart: Double Dash which sold 180,000 on its first day.[33] In the week ending May 4, 2008, Mario Kart Wii had sold over a million copies in Japan alone, less than a month since its release in the region.[34] In the UK, Mario Kart Wii was the best-selling video game in the week ending April 12, 2008, having "the eighth biggest opening sales week in UK software history," according to Chart-Track/ELSPA.[35][36] The game dwarfed all other five Mario Wii games released up until then for the Wii combined when comparing first week sales.[35] In the United States, Mario Kart Wii was the second-best-selling video game in April 2008, selling 1.12 million copies, according to the NPD Group; putting it behind the Xbox 360 version of Grand Theft Auto IV and ahead of the PlayStation 3 version, both released in the same week.[37] It ranked the fourth-best-selling game of December 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 979,000 copies.[38] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 2.409 million copies in the United States, 687,000 in the United Kingdom, and 1.601 million in Japan, respectively, for a total of 4.697 million copies sold by August 1, 2008.[39] As of March 2009, Nintendo has sold 15.4 million copies of Mario Kart Wii worldwide.[40] As of January 4, 2009, it has sold 2,133,000 copies in Japan.[41] It is also the fourth-best-selling game of Japan in 2008.[42] According to the NPD Group, GfK Chart-Track, and Enterbrain, the game has sold 856,000 copies in the United States, 394,000 in the United Kingdom, and 218,000 in Japan, respectively, for a total of 1.468 million copies sold in the third quarter of 2008 (July–September).[43] It was the second-best-selling game of 2008 in the United States, selling in excess of 5 million copies.[38] In France, it sold 4.8 million units, which is more than it sold in Japan (3.7 million).[44]

Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
Sheik is Princess Zelda's Sheikah alter ego in Ocarina of Time. Wearing a blue, possibly armored suit with the red Sheikah eye in the center, and with voice muffled and face concealed, the character is essentially unrecognizable and appears relatively masculine. It is possible that Zelda utilizes her magical skills in altering her appearance. Sheik plays a lyre and teaches Link new songs to help him on his quest. When Link arrives at the Temple of Time near the end of the game, Sheik transforms back into Princess Zelda.
One of the features of the series is the use of various power-up items obtained by driving into item boxes laid out on the course. These power-ups include mushrooms to give players a speed boost, Koopa Shells to be thrown at opponents, banana peels, and fake item boxes that can be laid on the course as hazards. The type of weapon received from an item box is influenced by the player's current position in the race.[3] For example, players lagging far behind may receive more powerful items while the leader may only receive small defensive items. Called rubber banding, this gameplay mechanism allows other players or computers a realistic chance to catch up to the leading player.
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