As Sheik, the character is completely different. Sheik is not only extremely fast, but also easy to control, making her a very popular character both in casual circles and in the tournament scene. Her close range attacks are possibly the fastest and most easily chainable of any character, with her martial arts training allowing fluid and swift ninja-like attacks. Sheik is at her best when using her speed and high-momentum attacks for an evasion-based "hit-and-run" offense. Her needle throwing attack is extremely flexible, and can be used to start combos or keep the enemy at bay. Her chain whip, while situational, is an excellent way to sabotage an opponent's strategy by interrupting their movements. Her Deku Nut-concealed vanish move is shorter than Farore's Wind but leaves Sheik much less open to attack, and is easier to use as an attack as well.
In order to keep all games in sequential order, all release dates below are for Japan unless specified. If there is a (JP) next to the release date - that means it was only released there and no where else. Use the 'Search' feature to quickly filter the game list. This list shows the individual Titles released for the Final Fantsay franhice, if you wish to see ever release, port or remake - it is best to use the Complete List linked below.
The traditional Mega Man boss design is another knock against the Power Gear as a useful ability. Because bosses already have vulnerabilities to certain weapons, there’s no point in amping up the weapons that already easily cut them down, and increasing the damage of weapons that barely do any is like upgrading your Nerf gun to Super Soaker. However, I found two pretty cool uses for the Power Gear. One is that Tundra Man’s T. Storm can be amplified to wipe out all enemies on screen like a more efficient Infinite Gauntlet. People watching me play in the office got a kick out of me hitting what amounted to the “nuke’em from orbit” button when frustration set in. The second is Impact Man’s P. Driver ability, which is a mid-air dash attack which is more useful for getting around because its charged form lets you zoom across the whole screen. See ya, disappearing block puzzle!
Interested in the Divine Beasts, Guardians, and Ancient Sheikah technology, she began dedicating herself to science instead of prayer, feeling it would be a better use of her abilities though continued to train and pray though her studies served as another way to contribute to Hyrule's defense in her own way. Zelda and a team of Sheikah researchers lead by Impa's elder sister Purah worked together to understand ancient technology discovering the Sheikah Slate, Shrine of Resurrection, and a better understanding of Guardians and the Divine Beasts which Zelda recorded in her research notes. She even shared her knowledge with the Zora Royal Family concerning Vah Ruta's water pumps. She also researched other things besides ancient technology such as plants and animals that enhance physical abilities when consumed showing she enjoyed scholarly research as she found it fascinating and wasn't burdened by it unlike prayer as she had prayed fervently to Hylia numerous times with nothing to show for it despite her dedication. Zelda personally recruited the four Champions to pilot the Divine Beasts convincing all of them to join her in defending Hyrule.
The developers had originally planned to use a famous vocalist in the ending of Final Fantasy VII, but the plan didn't go through due to being too abrupt, and there was no suitable theme in the story for a vocal song to suddenly come up in the ending. This idea was realized in Final Fantasy VIII whose "Eyes On Me" has a meaning in the plot and it relates to the game's main characters.[19] Uematsu went on to compose vocal theme songs for the main series games Final Fantasy IX, Final Fantasy X, Final Fantasy XII and Final Fantasy XIV, even though he didn't otherwise participate with Final Fantasy XII, its soundtrack being composed by Hitoshi Sakimoto.

That's good to see....though it's very weird they're doing this in Asia only, and not the US where this game would have shown much better performance with retail shelf visibility during the Christmas rush, given the family friendly nature. I really have no idea what on Earth Squeenix was thinking with how they've handled the release of this game. I'm not sure Squeenix knows either...it's kind of their M.O. these days....
Mega Man does have some notable flaws, however: While Mega Man has a good amount of attacks with good knockback, the majority of his kill moves are considered situational, difficult to set up, or and/or are easy to punish. As such, he has a more difficult time killing than other characters and it requires good reads to successfully finish off opponents. Characters that have a move that either reflects projectiles or can nullify them (such as Fox or Lady Palutena) can also prove to be an annoyance for him due to his over-reliance on projectiles to combo opponents and bait reactions and it can render his Forward Smash (one of his better kill moves) unreliable, though this can be worked around by firing the Mega Buster twice at a time, and most reflectors are punishable if baited and he can still grab them. Although Mega Man can effectively zone opponents at medium ranges with the Mega Buster, most of his other moves are fairly laggy or gimmicky and his only reliable tool in close range is his grab, and as such faster characters (such as Greninja or Captain Falcon) can bypass his zoning more easily and put work on him in closer ranges and due to his above average weight and falling speed, Mega Man is somewhat easy for these characters to combo once they get in, assuming that they have any combo potential.
In Twilight Princess, Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the deaths of herself and her people.[28] Afterward, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle. It is revealed that Zelda is unaffected by the veil of Twilight Zant casts upon Hyrule and does not become a spirit like all the other inhabitants of the kingdom. As the bearer of the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda may have been protected by its power.[23]
Final Fantasy[a] is a science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The series has also branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching out in other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.
Granted, you don't have to manually drive everywhere; there is a fast-travel option which costs a pittance of gil. But you don't get chocobos until Chapter 3, and if you're anything like probably a good majority of RPG enthusiasts, you do as many quests as you can, as early as you can. This means a ton of very slow walking/sprinting in a sprawling, rather empty world, and early on it's a bunch of rather boring sandy/rocky scenery.
Zelda Month has come and gone much too quickly. But for those who might’ve missed it, PeanutButterGamer (PBG) released his final video for the month just over a week ago. PGB, who started Zelda Month in 2011, puts a twist on his traditional videos with a Zelda product review. In the video, he takes some of the most interesting Zelda items from eBay and, in usual PBG spirit, reviews them with a kooky flair and comical hijinks. Give it a…
The Adult Timeline is the timeline that follows the events after Link is being sent back to his original time, following the Hero of Time's defeat of Ganondorf in the final battle. Ganondorf is sealed within the Sacred Realm by the Seven Sages but, with Link sent back in time, the world is left without a Hero. This turn of events created the timeline containing The Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks.
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
After the ending credits, Princess Zelda can be seen at her office signing papers and, depending on whether Link chose to be an engineer or a warrior, she will go look out the window and wave at Link upon hearing either a train whistle or swords clanking. If Link selects "Dunno", then Zelda will be signing papers and simply remember the adventure she had with Link.
100 hundred years later, Zelda telepathically speaks to an awakened Link, giving him words of advice. At Hyrule Castle, Zelda aids Link in his battle with Calamity Ganon's second form, Dark Beast Ganon, gifting him with the Light Bow and giving him advice on how to defeat him. After Link hits Ganon's weak spot, Zelda herself appears, freed from her own sealing magic. She then uses her powers to seal away Ganon for good, entrapping him in an explosion of light. As she and Link reunite face-to-face for the first time in a hundred years, she asks him with a smile if he remembers her. At the end of the game, Link and Zelda walk towards their horses to begin their new adventure together. Interestingly, it is revealed by Kass after completing all of his shrine quest riddles, that his mentor had been in love with the princess, yet noticed she "only had eyes for her appointed knight". This hints that Zelda holds deep feelings toward Link, with it being unclear if Link reciprocates these feelings.
This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
As Sheik, the character is completely different. Sheik is not only extremely fast, but also easy to control, making her a very popular character both in casual circles and in the tournament scene. Her close range attacks are possibly the fastest and most easily chainable of any character, with her martial arts training allowing fluid and swift ninja-like attacks. Sheik is at her best when using her speed and high-momentum attacks for an evasion-based "hit-and-run" offense. Her needle throwing attack is extremely flexible, and can be used to start combos or keep the enemy at bay. Her chain whip, while situational, is an excellent way to sabotage an opponent's strategy by interrupting their movements. Her Deku Nut-concealed vanish move is shorter than Farore's Wind but leaves Sheik much less open to attack, and is easier to use as an attack as well.
Several incarnations of Zelda have ties to the Sheikah through both her connection to the various incarnations of Impa and Zelda's Sheikah alter-ego, Sheik. Interestingly enough, though not a true Sheikah (as Sheik is an alter-ego), Zelda's robes in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess feature the Sheikah Symbol. In the Oracle series, her robes feature an alternate version of the Sheikah Symbol with the "eye" part of the symbol replaced by a Triforce symbol. in Ocarina of Time, Zelda (in her guise as Sheik) is shown to be knowledgeable of various Sheikah legends, which were presumably told to her by Impa, either during her childhood and/or while they were hiding from Ganondorf. It is also implied that Impa trained Zelda in the secret arts of Sheikah in order to allow her to pass herself off as Sheik and better protect herself from Ganondorf and his minions.
That's good to see....though it's very weird they're doing this in Asia only, and not the US where this game would have shown much better performance with retail shelf visibility during the Christmas rush, given the family friendly nature. I really have no idea what on Earth Squeenix was thinking with how they've handled the release of this game. I'm not sure Squeenix knows either...it's kind of their M.O. these days....
According to the in-game backstories, the world of Hyrule was created by the three golden goddesses: Din, Farore, and Nayru.[17] Before departing, the goddesses left a sacred artifact called the Triforce, which could grant powers to the user. It physically manifests itself as three golden triangles in which each embodies one of the goddesses' virtues: Power, Courage, and Wisdom.[18] However, because the Triforce has no will of its own and it could not judge between good and evil, it would grant any wish indiscriminately.[19][20] Because of this, it was placed within an alternate world called the "Sacred Realm" or the "Golden Land" until one worthy of its power and has balanced virtues of Power, Wisdom, and Courage in their heart could obtain it, in its entirety. If a person is not of a balanced heart, the triforce part that the user mostly believes in will stay with that person and the remainder will seek out others. In order to master and control the triforce as a whole, the user must get the other parts found in other individuals and bring them together to reunite them. The Sacred Realm can itself be affected by the heart of those who enters it: those who are pure will make it a paradise, while those who are evil will transform it into a dark realm.[21]
Mega Man gains various additional options from his custom moves. Shadow Blade and Ice Slasher are good for immobilizing opponents and are less susceptible to being used against Mega Man himself. Hyper Bomb and Danger Wrap are harder to land, but deal much more damage and knockback. Tornado Hold has more offensive value due to it dealing damage and granting Mega Man new combo potential. Plant Barrier does not last as long as the default Leaf Shield, but can deal and absorb more damage. Skull Barrier lacks a hitbox when circling Mega Man and deals less damage when thrown, but it reflects projectiles when orbiting and cannot be destroyed, giving it a more defensive value than both Leaf Shield and Plant Barrier lack.
Outside of turn-based systems, the series has occasionally featured purely action-based combat systems, in which the skills the characters use are still similar to traditional skillsets of attacks, magic spells, special abilities and items, but the rate the characters use these abilities depends on player skill with less reliance on menus. The first in the main series with an action role-playing game focus is Final Fantasy XV, though many spin-offs, such as Crisis Core -Final Fantasy VII- and Final Fantasy Type-0, have used these systems before.
The Wind Waker is parallel, and takes place in the other timeline branch, more than a century after the adult era of Ocarina of Time.[45][46] Phantom Hourglass is a continuation of the story from The Wind Waker,[47] and is followed by Spirit Tracks, which is set about 100 years later on a supercontinent far away from the setting of The Wind Waker.[48] At the time of its release, Four Swords for the Game Boy Advance was considered the oldest tale in the series' chronology, with Four Swords Adventures set sometime after its events.[49] The Minish Cap precedes the two games, telling of the origins of villain Vaati and the creation of the Four Sword.[50] A Link Between Worlds takes place six generations after Link to the Past. Important events that occur in the game include the Triforce being reunited, and Ganon being resurrected.[51]
The introduction of The Adventure of Link speaks of the legend of Zelda, a legend that has been passed down in Hyrule.[98] According to that legend, well before the events of The Legend of Zelda, Hyrule was a prosperous land ruled by a king who had two children, an unnamed prince and Princess Zelda. The King maintained peace in Hyrule using the Triforce; however, he passed away, and although the prince should have received the Triforce in full, he only received a part of it.[99] The prince frantically searched in vain everywhere for the remaining piece, but then a wizard came to the Prince and tells him that his younger sister, Zelda, knows the location of the mystical object.[100] The prince demands that Zelda turn the information over to him, but Zelda refuses and, in a rage, the wizard puts Zelda into an eternal sleep, with him dying in the process.[101] Overcome with grief, the prince seals his sleeping sister in the North Palace and orders that all female descendants of the Hylian monarchy are to be named Zelda.[41]
The Mario Kart series' player-character rosters generally consist of memorable characters from the Mario universe, including the main protagonist Mario; his brother Luigi; his love interest Princess Peach; his sidekick Yoshi; his friends Toad, Princess Daisy, and Rosalina; his antagonists and rivals Donkey Kong, Wario, and Waluigi; and his nemesis Bowser; among others. Each character's kart has different capabilities with differing levels of top speed, acceleration and handling.
Character concept artwork was handled by Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy VI who also handled logo and promotional image designs for games to follow. He was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura from Final Fantasy VII onwards (with the exception of Final Fantasy IX—where it was handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana and Shin Nagasawa—and Final Fantasy XII—where it was handled by Akihiko Yoshida).
I'm eight chapters in, which I believe is a little over halfway through the game, and the plot is not drawing me in at all. Many Final Fantasies lead with the main narrative element of "defeat the evil empire that wrecked your home/kingdom/city/planet", and Final Fantasy XV is no exception. This is not a bad thing, but unfortunately whoever was in charge of piecing this into a cohesive narrative seems to have twiddled his thumbs for nine-tenths of the decade it took to make this game.. in fact, it honestly seems like this happened with the whole game. Ten whole years, and it feels like they rushed it out in the last year and a half. I can definitely see why they delayed it another few months from its initial September release date. Imagine what it would've been like then?
Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule in this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on the Nintendo Switch console, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.
I’m going to go ahead and post the Mega Man 11 Game Hints page even though it’s still a bit of a work in progress. (Looking back on it, I’ve gotten wordy in my old age...) Sorry about the delay! I’ll get the Data Base page up after I have a chance to collate all of the information. I still have some testing and playing to do; after all, there are still some pits out there that I haven’t fallen into yet.
Wii Mario Kart Wii was released for the Wii in 2008. For the first time in the series, the player can race using motorcycles (labeled in-game as "bikes") and perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, slipstreaming, and wheelies. The game is primarily played using the plastic Wii Wheel accessory, which uses the controller's motion sensing to simulate operating a steering wheel. The game features 24 playable characters, the largest roster of the series at the time (Baby Daisy makes her debut in the Mario franchise, and other new additions to the Mario Kart series include Baby Peach, Funky Kong, Dry Bowser, and Rosalina; Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable). The concept of retro tracks is expanded to the Battle mode, with one retro battle course from each game in the series. When Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was in existence, Mario Kart Wii allowed the VS and Battle modes to be played by up to twelve participants, and also featured the "Mario Kart Channel," which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu and allowed players to check their regional or global Time Trial rankings, send and receive ghost data, and participate in worldwide tournaments on modified courses with special objectives.
Guinness World Records listed 6 records set by the Mario Kart series, including "First Console Kart Racing Game", "Best Selling Racing Game" and "Longest Running Kart Racing Franchise". Guinness World Records ranked the original Super Mario Kart number 1 on the list of top 50 console games of all time based on initial impact and lasting legacy.[13]
The series features a number of recurring character archetypes. Most famously, every game since Final Fantasy II, including subsequent remakes of the original Final Fantasy, features a character named Cid. Cid's appearance, personality, goals, and role in the game (non-playable ally, party member, villain) vary dramatically. However, two characteristics many versions of Cid have in common are 1) being a scientist or engineer, and 2) being tied in some way to an airship the party eventually acquires. Every Cid has at least one of these two traits.
Princess Zelda appears in this game solely as Tetra, her alter ego in The Wind Waker. She does not regain her royal persona, although quite often when she appears, “Zelda's Lullaby” plays in the background, and she is called "Zelda" by some of the pirates during the game's intro,[123] much to Tetra's chagrin.[124] Her role is somewhat limited in the game as she is kidnapped early on in the story, and when Link finds her at last she has been turned to stone.[125]

Final Fantasy installments are generally stand-alone stories each with different settings, plots and main characters, however, as a corpus they feature identical elements that define the franchise. Recurring elements include plot thematics, character names, and game mechanics. Plots center on a group of heroes battling a great evil while exploring the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, pop culture, and mythologies of cultures worldwide.


Though all incarnations of Mega Man feature unique stories, settings, and characters, they share several common features. All main Mega Man games released prior to 1997 are side-scrolling action platformers. The player character must fight through the levels using Mega Man's "Mega Buster"—a cannon attached to his arm—to shoot the robotic enemies inhabiting his environment. When Mega Man was released in 1987, the characteristic that made it revolutionary was the choice given to the player of which robot master to attempt first. After defeating a Robot Master—the boss of a level—Mega Man gains the ability to use that Robot Master's special weapon. Each Robot Master is representative of a specific element or object, with such bosses as Fire Man, Ice Man, Guts, Griffith, and Elec Man. The weapons Mega Man gains share the theme of the defeated boss. After defeating all of the Robot Masters, Mega Man travels to a multi-stage fortress to confront Dr. Wily, the person responsible for the robotic enemies' destructive acts. In the fortress, Mega Man fights past new bosses, clones of the game's Robot Masters, and Wily, who is usually in a large multi-phase war machine.
In Breath of the Wild, most people seem to be aware of Princess Zelda's role in sealing the Great Calamity in Hyrule Castle one hundred years prior. However, it is unclear whether they know that she is still fighting to keep him sealed. One of the travelers Link encounters during his travels is a Hylian woman who is retracing Zelda's journey to the three springs. Moreover, Zelda was spoken of by people who knew her to their descendants, as Toffa reveals his grandfather told him about the Princess and her white horse during "The Royal White Stallion", and inherited from him the Royal Bridle and Royal Saddle which were once used by Princess Zelda one century ago. After completing the quest, Toffa states that his grandfather claimed there was nothing more beautiful than the sight of Princess Zelda riding her horse.
Fi's spirit may continue to exist within the Master Sword in Breath of the Wild. Princess Zelda reveals to the Great Deku Tree that the Master Sword told her that her destiny was not finished, it convinced her to seal Calamity Ganon herself. In his vision after removing the sword, Link sees Zelda speaking to the Master Sword as if it was a person. She told the Master Sword that its master (Link) would come for it, like Fi whose spirit slumbers within the sword and refers to Link as "master" in Skyward Sword.
Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the death of her people. Subsequently, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle, although unlike her people, she does not become a spirit under the influence of the Twilight (possibly due to her implied possession of the Triforce of Wisdom). It is here that she meets Link, transformed into a wolf by the Twilight's power, though their conversation is cut short due to the arrival of her guard.

I was worried when I first saw Mega Man 11. Mega Man series lead Keiji Inafune had left Capcom in 2010, going on to make his own Mega Man clone. The new art style initially turned me off as well, as it was not as immediately appealing as the 80s-inspired throwbacks seen in Mega Man 9 and 10. But Mega Man 11 won me over with its delightfully amped-up difficulty and cool time-stopping ability that makes its challenges (barely) possible. The moments I had to take in the scenery were few, but Mega Man 11 taught me that feeling like Mega Man is more important than looking like Mega Man.
I just wish Square-Enix could have done this with .. pretty much any of the other characters in the game in any meaningful way. The only ones they seemed to have made an effort on, at this point in my playthrough, are Cindy and Iris, who both sadly are kind of terrible. Cindy has literally no depth other than "extremely blatant fanservice mechanic", and Iris' entire schtick is "Gladio's little sister that tries way too hard to be cute and has a serious crush on Noctis." Which is really weird that Iris is going for it and Gladio is egging her on when the point of this boyband roadtrip in the first place is to meet up with Noctis' fiancee so they can get married, which Noctis does not at all seem to be reluctant about. ..Ah, and Aranea. They did alright with her, actually. Everyone else (aside from prominent villains) seems to show up once or twice and then fade into the background.
Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.
Mega Man X received criticism from some publications as well. Ed Semrad, Danyon Carpenter, and Al Manuel of the EGM review panel all noted that the game may have too low a difficulty level; Semrad disliked the introductory stage and felt that the game was too short as well.[23] Super Play editor Zy Nicholson lowered his review score of the game because he found the levels were neither large nor challenging. "A few elementary tricks like repeating easy sections to recoup energy and weapon power will see you through the harder bits," Nicholson explained. "Within the level you'll also find restart points, extra lives, and no harsh time limit to put pressure on your performance. Couple this with a password system that records your level completion, status and weapon accumulation and you'll see we're not looking at a lasting challenge for the experienced player."[25] Nintendo Power criticized how little the game had changed stating that "the theme remains the same as the Game Boy and NES Mega Man titles."[20] The game's title initially proved a source of some confusion; the gaming media reported that many gamers mistook the "X" for the roman numeral 10.[29]
Despite having an unusual set of moves, Mega Man shines in approaching while spacing opponents at midrange and disrupting any approaches, for he is blessed with two projectiles that can cause opponents to react predictably: Metal Blade's ability to be thrown in eight directions and trapping opponents in high hitstun makes it a fantastic mindgame and shield-baiting tool, while Crash Bomber can cause panicky opponents to run towards Mega Man or shield the explosion. Both projectiles easily lead to a grab punish as Mega Man owns a great grab combo ability, having a fast grab and many of his attacks connecting reliably after a throw. This allows him to rack up damage easily once he grabs an opponent. He does not have much trouble KOing once his opponents are damaged either, for he has many finishing options: from his lightning-fast up tilt to his projectile based forward smash which can be used to edgeguard. His other projectiles are terrific, notably his aerials; up aerial can KO early if an opponent is high up, and his down aerial is one of the safest meteor smashes in the game. To top it all off, Mega Man is a fantastic spacer: his jab is a fast and useful projectile (that can be used while moving and jumping) which interrupts most attacks and weak projectiles at a safe range, and when combined with Metal Blades and Crash Bombs makes Mega Man difficult to approach. Due to his amazing pressuring ability and grab game, characters without a projectile or with low reach can have trouble approaching without being severely punished. Even if he does get knocked around, Mega Man is a heavyweight character, weighing only slightly less than Captain Falcon, meaning he is more likely to survive potentially lethal blows that could KO a lighter character, especially with proper DI and his good recovery move, Rush Coil.

Even after his crushing defeat at the hands of Mega Man, Dr. Wily was already planning his next scheme. If he could get his hands on the time machine (named Time Skimmer in the American manual) that was being developed at the Time-Space Research Laboratory (named Chronos Institute in the American manual), he thought he just might be able to change the past.


This game adds bikes, which I think adds nice diversity and feels very well balanced. The karts tend to be faster with better mini boosts from jumps and corners. The bikes can pop wheelies to get a mini boost on the straight stretches but are more vulnerable to being thrown off balance. My wife likes playing with karts and I like bikes, and I think she usually wins.
Born into a society of pirates on the Great Sea, Tetra, captain of a crew of pirates, was completely unaware that she was a member of the Royal Family of Hyrule's bloodline.[114][115] When this was revealed to her by King Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule, she was just as surprised as Link to find out that she was indeed a descendant of Princess Zelda of Hyrule and also the one destined to be the keeper of the Triforce of Wisdom.[22]
Zelda's body is eventually possessed by the resurrected Malladus, although Link frees it by firing a Light Arrow. Despite this, Zelda is unable to reenter her body, and just as Malladus is about to possess it again, Byrne uses his power to repel the Demon King, giving Zelda the strength to pray to her grandmother Tetra to reclaim her body.[128] In the final battle, Zelda, finally back in her own body, charges up her power to weaken the Demon King, which reveals a weak spot on the demon's back.[129] Like in previous games, Princess Zelda's role consists of shooting Light Arrows at Malladus's back from the Bow of Light.[130] Just as Link realizes that he cannot make the final blow to Malladus using the Lokomo Sword on his own, Princess Zelda rushes over to help the young hero, defeating the demon once and for all.[131] Anjean and the rest of the Lokomos depart to the heavens, entrusting Link and Zelda to watch over the land for them.[132] Link and Zelda are then seen holding hands as they witness the departure of the Lokomos.
During Linkle's Tale, Princess Zelda learns the magic of the Twilight Realm threatens Hyrule and leads a small group of Hyrulean Forces to stop it while her allies prepare to defeat Hyrule's enemies. Midna however follows her and meets Linkie who shows her a mysterious crystal that restores Midna's true form. Together they team up to help Zelda who is imprisoned by dark constructs of Twili Midna and Zant created by the out of control Twilight magic. Linkie and Twili Midna free Zelda and Twili Midna shatters the crystal to seal the Twilight magic at the cost of becoming cursed once more reverting to her Imp form though she is fine with it as Hyrule and Zelda are safe. Linkie inspired by Midna and Princess Zelda's selflessness decides to continue on her journey to Hyrule Castle instead of simply joining them.
So, would I recommend this game? Sure. Is it a must-have? Nah. If you're on the fence, wait until it goes on sale and play something better in the meantime. It's obviously been rushed out in the past couple years, and it's not much of a Final Fantasy game in terms of pacing and plot and cohesiveness in general, but it is a generally entertaining action RPG, if fairly repetitive.

Like Link, several of Zelda's various incarnations are shown to be talented musicians. At least three of incarnations are known to be harp-players (Ocarina of Time, Skyward Sword, and Hyrule Warriors). She also shows a talent for playing wind-based instruments such as an ocarina and a pan flute. She is also been shown to have a talent for singing as well.
The Legend of Zelda series has received outstanding levels of acclaim from critics and the public. Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, Skyward Sword, and Breath of the Wild have each received a perfect 40/40 score (10/10 by four reviewers) by Japanese Famitsu magazine,[175][176] making Zelda one of the few series with multiple perfect scores. Ocarina of Time was even listed by Guinness World Records as the highest-rated video game in history, citing its Metacritic score of 99 out of 100.[177] Computer and Video Games awarded The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess a score of 10/10.[178][179] A Link to the Past has won Gold Award from Electronic Gaming Monthly. In Nintendo Power's Top 200 countdown in 2004, Ocarina of Time took first place, and seven other Zelda games placed in the top 40.[180] Twilight Princess was named Game of the Year by X-Play, GameTrailers, 1UP, Electronic Gaming Monthly, Spacey Awards, Game Informer, GameSpy, Nintendo Power, IGN, and many other websites. The editors of review aggregator websites GameRankings, IGN and Metacritic have all given Ocarina of Time their highest aggregate scores.[181] Game Informer has awarded The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword, A Link Between Worlds and Breath of the Wild with scores of 10/10. Phantom Hourglass was named DS Game of the Year by IGN and GameSpy.[182][183] Airing December 10, 2011, Spike TV's annual Video Game Awards gave the series the first ever "Hall of Fame Award", which Miyamoto accepted in person.[184] Ocarina of Time and its use of melodic themes to identify different game regions has been called a reverse of Richard Wagner's use of leitmotifs to identify characters and themes.[185] Ocarina of Time was so well received that sales increased for real ocarinas.[186] IGN praised the music of Majora's Mask for its brilliance despite its heavy use of MIDI. It has been ranked the seventh-greatest game by Electronic Gaming Monthly, whereas Ocarina of Time was ranked eighth.[187][188] The series won GameFAQs Best Series Ever competition.[189]

LIkewise, while many of the levels are incredibly well designed such as Block Man's stage (which makes a great tutorial for the double gear system) or Tundra Man's stage, this just makes it more obvious when level design falls short of expectations. Bounce Man's stage may be the single most frustrating stage to appear in a classic Mega Man game, and the flame wall in Torch Man's stage is more frustrating than challenging.
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